Grand Tour Of Scotland: Exploring Orkney #47

Day 6: 16 August 2019 ~ Standing Stones of Stenness

The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Location: The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-16
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • F-Stop: f/5
  • Exposure Time: 1/640 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-250
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld

The Standing Stones of Stenness, is a Neolithic monument five miles northeast of Stromness on the mainland of Orkney, Scotland. It may be the oldest henge site in the British Isles. Various traditions associated with the stones survived into the modern era, and they form part of the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site.

The surviving stones are on the south bank of the stream that joins the southern ends of the sea loch Loch of Stenness and the freshwater Loch of Harray. The name pronounced as stane-is in Orcadian dialect, comes from an Old Norse meaning stone headland

The Stenness Watch Stone stands outside the circle, next to the modern bridge leading to the Ring of Brodgar.

Although the site today lacks the encircling ditch and bank, excavation has shown that this used to be a henge monument, possibly the oldest in the British Isles. The stones are thin slabs, approximately 30 cm thick, with sharply angled tops. Four, up to about 5 m high, were elements of a stone circle of up to 12 stones, laid out in an ellipse about 32 m diameter on a leveled platform of 44 m diameter surrounded by a ditch. 

The ditch is cut into the rock by as much as 2 m and is 7 m wide, surrounded by an earth bank, with a single entrance causeway on the north side. The entrance faces towards the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement adjacent to the Loch of Harray. 

The Watch Stone stands outside the circle to the northwest and is 5.6 m high. Once there were at least two stones there. The stump of a second stone was found in the 1930s. 

Other smaller stones include a square stone set in the center where cremated bone, charcoal, and pottery were found, called a “hearth.”

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Exploring Orkney #46

Day 6: 16 August 2019 ~ Standing Stones of Stenness

The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Location: The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-16
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/1000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-250
  • Focal Length: 130 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld

The Standing Stones of Stenness, is a Neolithic monument five miles northeast of Stromness on the mainland of Orkney, Scotland. It may be the oldest henge site in the British Isles. Various traditions associated with the stones survived into the modern era, and they form part of the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site.

The surviving stones are on the south bank of the stream that joins the southern ends of the sea loch Loch of Stenness and the freshwater Loch of Harray. The name pronounced as stane-is in Orcadian dialect, comes from an Old Norse meaning stone headland

The Stenness Watch Stone stands outside the circle, next to the modern bridge leading to the Ring of Brodgar.

Although the site today lacks the encircling ditch and bank, excavation has shown that this used to be a henge monument, possibly the oldest in the British Isles. The stones are thin slabs, approximately 30 cm thick, with sharply angled tops. Four, up to about 5 m high, were elements of a stone circle of up to 12 stones, laid out in an ellipse about 32 m diameter on a leveled platform of 44 m diameter surrounded by a ditch. 

The ditch is cut into the rock by as much as 2 m and is 7 m wide, surrounded by an earth bank, with a single entrance causeway on the north side. The entrance faces towards the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement adjacent to the Loch of Harray. 

The Watch Stone stands outside the circle to the northwest and is 5.6 m high. Once there were at least two stones there. The stump of a second stone was found in the 1930s. 

Other smaller stones include a square stone set in the center where cremated bone, charcoal, and pottery were found, called a “hearth.”

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Exploring Orkney #45

Day 6: 16 August 2019 ~ Standing Stones of Stenness

The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Location: The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-16
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • F-Stop: f/5
  • Exposure Time: 1/1000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-250
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld

The Standing Stones of Stenness, is a Neolithic monument five miles northeast of Stromness on the mainland of Orkney, Scotland. It may be the oldest henge site in the British Isles. Various traditions associated with the stones survived into the modern era, and they form part of the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site.

The surviving stones are on the south bank of the stream that joins the southern ends of the sea loch Loch of Stenness and the freshwater Loch of Harray. The name pronounced as stane-is in Orcadian dialect, comes from an Old Norse meaning stone headland

The Stenness Watch Stone stands outside the circle, next to the modern bridge leading to the Ring of Brodgar.

Although the site today lacks the encircling ditch and bank, excavation has shown that this used to be a henge monument, possibly the oldest in the British Isles. The stones are thin slabs, approximately 30 cm thick, with sharply angled tops. Four, up to about 5 m high, were elements of a stone circle of up to 12 stones, laid out in an ellipse about 32 m diameter on a leveled platform of 44 m diameter surrounded by a ditch. 

The ditch is cut into the rock by as much as 2 m and is 7 m wide, surrounded by an earth bank, with a single entrance causeway on the north side. The entrance faces towards the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement adjacent to the Loch of Harray. 

The Watch Stone stands outside the circle to the northwest and is 5.6 m high. Once there were at least two stones there. The stump of a second stone was found in the 1930s. 

Other smaller stones include a square stone set in the center where cremated bone, charcoal, and pottery were found, called a “hearth.”

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Exploring Orkney #44

Day 6: 16 August 2019 ~ Standing Stones of Stenness

The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Location: The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-16
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • F-Stop: f/5
  • Exposure Time: 1/500 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-250
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld

The Standing Stones of Stenness, is a Neolithic monument five miles northeast of Stromness on the mainland of Orkney, Scotland. It may be the oldest henge site in the British Isles. Various traditions associated with the stones survived into the modern era, and they form part of the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site.

The surviving stones are on the south bank of the stream that joins the southern ends of the sea loch Loch of Stenness and the freshwater Loch of Harray. The name pronounced as stane-is in Orcadian dialect, comes from an Old Norse meaning stone headland

The Stenness Watch Stone stands outside the circle, next to the modern bridge leading to the Ring of Brodgar.

Although the site today lacks the encircling ditch and bank, excavation has shown that this used to be a henge monument, possibly the oldest in the British Isles. The stones are thin slabs, approximately 30 cm thick, with sharply angled tops. Four, up to about 5 m high, were elements of a stone circle of up to 12 stones, laid out in an ellipse about 32 m diameter on a leveled platform of 44 m diameter surrounded by a ditch. 

The ditch is cut into the rock by as much as 2 m and is 7 m wide, surrounded by an earth bank, with a single entrance causeway on the north side. The entrance faces towards the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement adjacent to the Loch of Harray. 

The Watch Stone stands outside the circle to the northwest and is 5.6 m high. Once there were at least two stones there. The stump of a second stone was found in the 1930s. 

Other smaller stones include a square stone set in the center where cremated bone, charcoal, and pottery were found, called a “hearth.”

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Exploring Orkney #43

Day 6: 16 August 2019 ~ Standing Stones of Stenness

The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Location: The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-16
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • F-Stop: f/5
  • Exposure Time: 1/320 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-250
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld

The Standing Stones of Stenness, is a Neolithic monument five miles northeast of Stromness on the mainland of Orkney, Scotland. It may be the oldest henge site in the British Isles. Various traditions associated with the stones survived into the modern era, and they form part of the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site.

The surviving stones are on the south bank of the stream that joins the southern ends of the sea loch Loch of Stenness and the freshwater Loch of Harray. The name pronounced as stane-is in Orcadian dialect, comes from an Old Norse meaning stone headland

The Stenness Watch Stone stands outside the circle, next to the modern bridge leading to the Ring of Brodgar.

Although the site today lacks the encircling ditch and bank, excavation has shown that this used to be a henge monument, possibly the oldest in the British Isles. The stones are thin slabs, approximately 30 cm thick, with sharply angled tops. Four, up to about 5 m high, were elements of a stone circle of up to 12 stones, laid out in an ellipse about 32 m diameter on a leveled platform of 44 m diameter surrounded by a ditch. 

The ditch is cut into the rock by as much as 2 m and is 7 m wide, surrounded by an earth bank, with a single entrance causeway on the north side. The entrance faces towards the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement adjacent to the Loch of Harray. 

The Watch Stone stands outside the circle to the northwest and is 5.6 m high. Once there were at least two stones there. The stump of a second stone was found in the 1930s. 

Other smaller stones include a square stone set in the center where cremated bone, charcoal, and pottery were found, called a “hearth.”

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Exploring Orkney #42

Day 6: 16 August 2019 ~ Standing Stones of Stenness

The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Location: The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-16
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • F-Stop: f/5
  • Exposure Time: 1/320 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-250
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld

The Standing Stones of Stenness, is a Neolithic monument five miles northeast of Stromness on the mainland of Orkney, Scotland. It may be the oldest henge site in the British Isles. Various traditions associated with the stones survived into the modern era, and they form part of the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site.

The surviving stones are on the south bank of the stream that joins the southern ends of the sea loch Loch of Stenness and the freshwater Loch of Harray. The name pronounced as stane-is in Orcadian dialect, comes from an Old Norse meaning stone headland

The Stenness Watch Stone stands outside the circle, next to the modern bridge leading to the Ring of Brodgar.

Although the site today lacks the encircling ditch and bank, excavation has shown that this used to be a henge monument, possibly the oldest in the British Isles. The stones are thin slabs, approximately 30 cm thick, with sharply angled tops. Four, up to about 5 m high, were elements of a stone circle of up to 12 stones, laid out in an ellipse about 32 m diameter on a leveled platform of 44 m diameter surrounded by a ditch. 

The ditch is cut into the rock by as much as 2 m and is 7 m wide, surrounded by an earth bank, with a single entrance causeway on the north side. The entrance faces towards the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement adjacent to the Loch of Harray. 

The Watch Stone stands outside the circle to the northwest and is 5.6 m high. Once there were at least two stones there. The stump of a second stone was found in the 1930s. 

Other smaller stones include a square stone set in the center where cremated bone, charcoal, and pottery were found, called a “hearth.”

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Exploring Orkney #41

Day 6: 16 August 2019 ~ Standing Stones of Stenness

The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Location: The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-16
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • F-Stop: f/5
  • Exposure Time: 1/125 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-250
  • Focal Length: 32 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld

The Standing Stones of Stenness, is a Neolithic monument five miles northeast of Stromness on the mainland of Orkney, Scotland. It may be the oldest henge site in the British Isles. Various traditions associated with the stones survived into the modern era, and they form part of the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site.

The surviving stones are on the south bank of the stream that joins the southern ends of the sea loch Loch of Stenness and the freshwater Loch of Harray. The name pronounced as stane-is in Orcadian dialect, comes from an Old Norse meaning stone headland

The Stenness Watch Stone stands outside the circle, next to the modern bridge leading to the Ring of Brodgar.

Although the site today lacks the encircling ditch and bank, excavation has shown that this used to be a henge monument, possibly the oldest in the British Isles. The stones are thin slabs, approximately 30 cm thick, with sharply angled tops. Four, up to about 5 m high, were elements of a stone circle of up to 12 stones, laid out in an ellipse about 32 m diameter on a leveled platform of 44 m diameter surrounded by a ditch. 

The ditch is cut into the rock by as much as 2 m and is 7 m wide, surrounded by an earth bank, with a single entrance causeway on the north side. The entrance faces towards the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement adjacent to the Loch of Harray. 

The Watch Stone stands outside the circle to the northwest and is 5.6 m high. Once there were at least two stones there. The stump of a second stone was found in the 1930s. 

Other smaller stones include a square stone set in the center where cremated bone, charcoal, and pottery were found, called a “hearth.”

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Good Day: 30 November 2021

Good day friends,

I hope everyone had a good nights rest and are ready for the day. I woke up with a grateful heart. I am healthy, alive and doing what I love.

I had a very busy morning that is why I am only writing my post now. Well somewhere in the world it is still morning….

I got up at 6:00, got dressed and put out the trash. Willow followed me and was super excited. Every time I tell her that she must stay home she started talking to me and jumping around like a bouncing ball. It was raining and I decided to take her for a quick drive to fill the car and we ended up at Boland Dog park. Willow was the only one there and we had the whole park to ourselves. The only mad ones walking around in the rain…. When we got home Willow knew something was still going to happen, she did not want to get out of the car. I then walked inside like always and she followed.

After I gave her some treats I left for Majic forest to capture some woodland photos for my assignment. It was supposed to be cloudy and raining but as soon as I got there it was sunny with a few clouds in the air…. I took 256 photos I hope I can use 3 of them for my assignment. I did spot some compositions but the light was to harsh. Will have to get there earlier in the morning. I was suppose to be there at 7:00 when they open the gates but Willow happened…. It is my own fault. I spend a whole three hours and one minute at Majic Forest and I only walked 3.71km.

If you look at the map in detail, it looks like a child trying to color. Or like my dad said, look like I was on a sugar high running around spotting something here, then there and then over there and it continued until I ran out of sugar. And it was something like that. I saw a lot of compositions, but some just did not pan out because of too harsh light. But that gives me the opportunity to go back and take them at a later time.

I wanted to take photos with my phone with every composition, but I got so distracted that I completely forgot about my phone. Taking photos in Majic forest is not that easy especially on the routes where the mountain bikers are allowed to cycle. A few times I was just set up and ready to take the photo then a cyclist comes around the corner and I have to grab my tripod and get out of the way…. The one shot I had to set up twice before I had enough time to take the photo….

First composition taken with phone angle 1
First Composition taken with phone Angle 2
My route according to the phone screen
Part of my route enlarged…

According to the weather forecast, we are having another beautiful, cool and windy Spring day. With a maximum temperature of 22°C and winds up to 18 km/h.

YR Weather App
YR Weather App
YR Weather App
Clear Outside Weather App
Clear Outside Weather App

On my To-Do List for today.

  • Woodland Shoot
  • Download and go through photos of shoot
  • Prepare Dinner.

Thank you for all your support and for taking the time to look at my posts. I am truly grateful for every view, like, and comment I receive.

Well I am off to the shops friends, have a wonderful day.

🤗Big Virtual Hug 🤗

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Exploring Orkney #40

Day 6: 16 August 2019 ~ Standing Stones of Stenness

The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Location: The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-16
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • F-Stop: f/5
  • Exposure Time: 1/125 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-250
  • Focal Length: 60 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld

The Standing Stones of Stenness, is a Neolithic monument five miles northeast of Stromness on the mainland of Orkney, Scotland. It may be the oldest henge site in the British Isles. Various traditions associated with the stones survived into the modern era, and they form part of the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site.

The surviving stones are on the south bank of the stream that joins the southern ends of the sea loch Loch of Stenness and the freshwater Loch of Harray. The name pronounced as stane-is in Orcadian dialect, comes from an Old Norse meaning stone headland

The Stenness Watch Stone stands outside the circle, next to the modern bridge leading to the Ring of Brodgar.

Although the site today lacks the encircling ditch and bank, excavation has shown that this used to be a henge monument, possibly the oldest in the British Isles. The stones are thin slabs, approximately 30 cm thick, with sharply angled tops. Four, up to about 5 m high, were elements of a stone circle of up to 12 stones, laid out in an ellipse about 32 m diameter on a leveled platform of 44 m diameter surrounded by a ditch. 

The ditch is cut into the rock by as much as 2 m and is 7 m wide, surrounded by an earth bank, with a single entrance causeway on the north side. The entrance faces towards the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement adjacent to the Loch of Harray. 

The Watch Stone stands outside the circle to the northwest and is 5.6 m high. Once there were at least two stones there. The stump of a second stone was found in the 1930s. 

Other smaller stones include a square stone set in the center where cremated bone, charcoal, and pottery were found, called a “hearth.”

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Exploring Orkney #39

Day 6: 16 August 2019 ~ Standing Stones of Stenness

The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Location: The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-16
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • F-Stop: f/5
  • Exposure Time: 1/800 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-250
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld

The Standing Stones of Stenness, is a Neolithic monument five miles northeast of Stromness on the mainland of Orkney, Scotland. It may be the oldest henge site in the British Isles. Various traditions associated with the stones survived into the modern era, and they form part of the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site.

The surviving stones are on the south bank of the stream that joins the southern ends of the sea loch Loch of Stenness and the freshwater Loch of Harray. The name pronounced as stane-is in Orcadian dialect, comes from an Old Norse meaning stone headland

The Stenness Watch Stone stands outside the circle, next to the modern bridge leading to the Ring of Brodgar.

Although the site today lacks the encircling ditch and bank, excavation has shown that this used to be a henge monument, possibly the oldest in the British Isles. The stones are thin slabs, approximately 30 cm thick, with sharply angled tops. Four, up to about 5 m high, were elements of a stone circle of up to 12 stones, laid out in an ellipse about 32 m diameter on a leveled platform of 44 m diameter surrounded by a ditch. 

The ditch is cut into the rock by as much as 2 m and is 7 m wide, surrounded by an earth bank, with a single entrance causeway on the north side. The entrance faces towards the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement adjacent to the Loch of Harray. 

The Watch Stone stands outside the circle to the northwest and is 5.6 m high. Once there were at least two stones there. The stump of a second stone was found in the 1930s. 

Other smaller stones include a square stone set in the center where cremated bone, charcoal, and pottery were found, called a “hearth.”

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Exploring Orkney #38

Day 6: 16 August 2019 ~ Standing Stones of Stenness

The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Location: The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-16
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • F-Stop: f/5
  • Exposure Time: 1/800 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-250
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld

The Standing Stones of Stenness, is a Neolithic monument five miles northeast of Stromness on the mainland of Orkney, Scotland. It may be the oldest henge site in the British Isles. Various traditions associated with the stones survived into the modern era, and they form part of the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site.

The surviving stones are on the south bank of the stream that joins the southern ends of the sea loch Loch of Stenness and the freshwater Loch of Harray. The name pronounced as stane-is in Orcadian dialect, comes from an Old Norse meaning stone headland

The Stenness Watch Stone stands outside the circle, next to the modern bridge leading to the Ring of Brodgar.

Although the site today lacks the encircling ditch and bank, excavation has shown that this used to be a henge monument, possibly the oldest in the British Isles. The stones are thin slabs, approximately 30 cm thick, with sharply angled tops. Four, up to about 5 m high, were elements of a stone circle of up to 12 stones, laid out in an ellipse about 32 m diameter on a leveled platform of 44 m diameter surrounded by a ditch. 

The ditch is cut into the rock by as much as 2 m and is 7 m wide, surrounded by an earth bank, with a single entrance causeway on the north side. The entrance faces towards the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement adjacent to the Loch of Harray. 

The Watch Stone stands outside the circle to the northwest and is 5.6 m high. Once there were at least two stones there. The stump of a second stone was found in the 1930s. 

Other smaller stones include a square stone set in the center where cremated bone, charcoal, and pottery were found, called a “hearth.”

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Exploring Orkney #37

Day 6: 16 August 2019 ~ Standing Stones of Stenness

The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Location: The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-16
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • F-Stop: f/5
  • Exposure Time: 1/800 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-250
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld

The Standing Stones of Stenness, is a Neolithic monument five miles northeast of Stromness on the mainland of Orkney, Scotland. It may be the oldest henge site in the British Isles. Various traditions associated with the stones survived into the modern era, and they form part of the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site.

The surviving stones are on the south bank of the stream that joins the southern ends of the sea loch Loch of Stenness and the freshwater Loch of Harray. The name pronounced as stane-is in Orcadian dialect, comes from an Old Norse meaning stone headland

The Stenness Watch Stone stands outside the circle, next to the modern bridge leading to the Ring of Brodgar.

Although the site today lacks the encircling ditch and bank, excavation has shown that this used to be a henge monument, possibly the oldest in the British Isles. The stones are thin slabs, approximately 30 cm thick, with sharply angled tops. Four, up to about 5 m high, were elements of a stone circle of up to 12 stones, laid out in an ellipse about 32 m diameter on a leveled platform of 44 m diameter surrounded by a ditch. 

The ditch is cut into the rock by as much as 2 m and is 7 m wide, surrounded by an earth bank, with a single entrance causeway on the north side. The entrance faces towards the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement adjacent to the Loch of Harray. 

The Watch Stone stands outside the circle to the northwest and is 5.6 m high. Once there were at least two stones there. The stump of a second stone was found in the 1930s. 

Other smaller stones include a square stone set in the center where cremated bone, charcoal, and pottery were found, called a “hearth.”

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Exploring Orkney #36

Day 6: 16 August 2019 ~ Standing Stones of Stenness

The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Location: The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-16
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • F-Stop: f/5
  • Exposure Time: 1/800 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-250
  • Focal Length: 32 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld

The Standing Stones of Stenness, is a Neolithic monument five miles northeast of Stromness on the mainland of Orkney, Scotland. It may be the oldest henge site in the British Isles. Various traditions associated with the stones survived into the modern era, and they form part of the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site.

The surviving stones are on the south bank of the stream that joins the southern ends of the sea loch Loch of Stenness and the freshwater Loch of Harray. The name pronounced as stane-is in Orcadian dialect, comes from an Old Norse meaning stone headland

The Stenness Watch Stone stands outside the circle, next to the modern bridge leading to the Ring of Brodgar.

Although the site today lacks the encircling ditch and bank, excavation has shown that this used to be a henge monument, possibly the oldest in the British Isles. The stones are thin slabs, approximately 30 cm thick, with sharply angled tops. Four, up to about 5 m high, were elements of a stone circle of up to 12 stones, laid out in an ellipse about 32 m diameter on a leveled platform of 44 m diameter surrounded by a ditch. 

The ditch is cut into the rock by as much as 2 m and is 7 m wide, surrounded by an earth bank, with a single entrance causeway on the north side. The entrance faces towards the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement adjacent to the Loch of Harray. 

The Watch Stone stands outside the circle to the northwest and is 5.6 m high. Once there were at least two stones there. The stump of a second stone was found in the 1930s. 

Other smaller stones include a square stone set in the center where cremated bone, charcoal, and pottery were found, called a “hearth.”

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Exploring Orkney #35

Day 6: 16 August 2019 ~ Standing Stones of Stenness

The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Location: The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-16
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • F-Stop: f/5
  • Exposure Time: 1/800 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-250
  • Focal Length: 32 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld

The Standing Stones of Stenness, is a Neolithic monument five miles northeast of Stromness on the mainland of Orkney, Scotland. It may be the oldest henge site in the British Isles. Various traditions associated with the stones survived into the modern era, and they form part of the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site.

The surviving stones are on the south bank of the stream that joins the southern ends of the sea loch Loch of Stenness and the freshwater Loch of Harray. The name pronounced as stane-is in Orcadian dialect, comes from an Old Norse meaning stone headland

The Stenness Watch Stone stands outside the circle, next to the modern bridge leading to the Ring of Brodgar.

Although the site today lacks the encircling ditch and bank, excavation has shown that this used to be a henge monument, possibly the oldest in the British Isles. The stones are thin slabs, approximately 30 cm thick, with sharply angled tops. Four, up to about 5 m high, were elements of a stone circle of up to 12 stones, laid out in an ellipse about 32 m diameter on a leveled platform of 44 m diameter surrounded by a ditch. 

The ditch is cut into the rock by as much as 2 m and is 7 m wide, surrounded by an earth bank, with a single entrance causeway on the north side. The entrance faces towards the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement adjacent to the Loch of Harray. 

The Watch Stone stands outside the circle to the northwest and is 5.6 m high. Once there were at least two stones there. The stump of a second stone was found in the 1930s. 

Other smaller stones include a square stone set in the center where cremated bone, charcoal, and pottery were found, called a “hearth.”

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Exploring Orkney #34

Day 6: 16 August 2019 ~ Standing Stones of Stenness

The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Location: The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-16
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • F-Stop: f/5
  • Exposure Time: 1/800 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-250
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld

The Standing Stones of Stenness, is a Neolithic monument five miles northeast of Stromness on the mainland of Orkney, Scotland. It may be the oldest henge site in the British Isles. Various traditions associated with the stones survived into the modern era, and they form part of the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site.

The surviving stones are on the south bank of the stream that joins the southern ends of the sea loch Loch of Stenness and the freshwater Loch of Harray. The name pronounced as stane-is in Orcadian dialect, comes from an Old Norse meaning stone headland

The Stenness Watch Stone stands outside the circle, next to the modern bridge leading to the Ring of Brodgar.

Although the site today lacks the encircling ditch and bank, excavation has shown that this used to be a henge monument, possibly the oldest in the British Isles. The stones are thin slabs, approximately 30 cm thick, with sharply angled tops. Four, up to about 5 m high, were elements of a stone circle of up to 12 stones, laid out in an ellipse about 32 m diameter on a leveled platform of 44 m diameter surrounded by a ditch. 

The ditch is cut into the rock by as much as 2 m and is 7 m wide, surrounded by an earth bank, with a single entrance causeway on the north side. The entrance faces towards the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement adjacent to the Loch of Harray. 

The Watch Stone stands outside the circle to the northwest and is 5.6 m high. Once there were at least two stones there. The stump of a second stone was found in the 1930s. 

Other smaller stones include a square stone set in the center where cremated bone, charcoal, and pottery were found, called a “hearth.”

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Exploring Orkney #33

Day 6: 16 August 2019 ~ Standing Stones of Stenness

The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Location: The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-16
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • F-Stop: f/5
  • Exposure Time: 1/800 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-250
  • Focal Length: 32 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld

The Standing Stones of Stenness, is a Neolithic monument five miles northeast of Stromness on the mainland of Orkney, Scotland. It may be the oldest henge site in the British Isles. Various traditions associated with the stones survived into the modern era, and they form part of the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site.

The surviving stones are on the south bank of the stream that joins the southern ends of the sea loch Loch of Stenness and the freshwater Loch of Harray. The name pronounced as stane-is in Orcadian dialect, comes from an Old Norse meaning stone headland

The Stenness Watch Stone stands outside the circle, next to the modern bridge leading to the Ring of Brodgar.

Although the site today lacks the encircling ditch and bank, excavation has shown that this used to be a henge monument, possibly the oldest in the British Isles. The stones are thin slabs, approximately 30 cm thick, with sharply angled tops. Four, up to about 5 m high, were elements of a stone circle of up to 12 stones, laid out in an ellipse about 32 m diameter on a leveled platform of 44 m diameter surrounded by a ditch. 

The ditch is cut into the rock by as much as 2 m and is 7 m wide, surrounded by an earth bank, with a single entrance causeway on the north side. The entrance faces towards the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement adjacent to the Loch of Harray. 

The Watch Stone stands outside the circle to the northwest and is 5.6 m high. Once there were at least two stones there. The stump of a second stone was found in the 1930s. 

Other smaller stones include a square stone set in the center where cremated bone, charcoal, and pottery were found, called a “hearth.”

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Exploring Orkney #32

Day 6: 16 August 2019 ~ Standing Stones of Stenness

The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Location: The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-16
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • F-Stop: f/5
  • Exposure Time: 1/800 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-250
  • Focal Length: 50 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld

The Standing Stones of Stenness, is a Neolithic monument five miles northeast of Stromness on the mainland of Orkney, Scotland. It may be the oldest henge site in the British Isles. Various traditions associated with the stones survived into the modern era, and they form part of the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site.

The surviving stones are on the south bank of the stream that joins the southern ends of the sea loch Loch of Stenness and the freshwater Loch of Harray. The name pronounced as stane-is in Orcadian dialect, comes from an Old Norse meaning stone headland

The Stenness Watch Stone stands outside the circle, next to the modern bridge leading to the Ring of Brodgar.

Although the site today lacks the encircling ditch and bank, excavation has shown that this used to be a henge monument, possibly the oldest in the British Isles. The stones are thin slabs, approximately 30 cm thick, with sharply angled tops. Four, up to about 5 m high, were elements of a stone circle of up to 12 stones, laid out in an ellipse about 32 m diameter on a leveled platform of 44 m diameter surrounded by a ditch. 

The ditch is cut into the rock by as much as 2 m and is 7 m wide, surrounded by an earth bank, with a single entrance causeway on the north side. The entrance faces towards the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement adjacent to the Loch of Harray. 

The Watch Stone stands outside the circle to the northwest and is 5.6 m high. Once there were at least two stones there. The stump of a second stone was found in the 1930s. 

Other smaller stones include a square stone set in the center where cremated bone, charcoal, and pottery were found, called a “hearth.”

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Cee’s Flower Of The Day Challenge: 30 November 2021 – Bottlebrush

Good day friends,

I hope that you all are still happy and healthy.

Here is my contribution for Cee’s FOTD Challenge.

Bottlebrush, Kraaifontein, Cape Town, South Africa (2020-12-04)

“Minds are like flowers, they open only when the time is right.” ~Stephen Richards

With all my heart, Thank You for your ongoing support and for taking the time to have a look at my post.

Stay safe and healthy. Till next time.

Have a Fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Exploring Orkney #31

Day 6: 16 August 2019 ~ Standing Stones of Stenness

The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Location: The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-16
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • F-Stop: f/5
  • Exposure Time: 1/400 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-250
  • Focal Length: 50 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld

The Standing Stones of Stenness, is a Neolithic monument five miles northeast of Stromness on the mainland of Orkney, Scotland. It may be the oldest henge site in the British Isles. Various traditions associated with the stones survived into the modern era, and they form part of the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site.

The surviving stones are on the south bank of the stream that joins the southern ends of the sea loch Loch of Stenness and the freshwater Loch of Harray. The name pronounced as stane-is in Orcadian dialect, comes from an Old Norse meaning stone headland

The Stenness Watch Stone stands outside the circle, next to the modern bridge leading to the Ring of Brodgar.

Although the site today lacks the encircling ditch and bank, excavation has shown that this used to be a henge monument, possibly the oldest in the British Isles. The stones are thin slabs, approximately 30 cm thick, with sharply angled tops. Four, up to about 5 m high, were elements of a stone circle of up to 12 stones, laid out in an ellipse about 32 m diameter on a leveled platform of 44 m diameter surrounded by a ditch. 

The ditch is cut into the rock by as much as 2 m and is 7 m wide, surrounded by an earth bank, with a single entrance causeway on the north side. The entrance faces towards the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement adjacent to the Loch of Harray. 

The Watch Stone stands outside the circle to the northwest and is 5.6 m high. Once there were at least two stones there. The stump of a second stone was found in the 1930s. 

Other smaller stones include a square stone set in the center where cremated bone, charcoal, and pottery were found, called a “hearth.”

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Exploring Orkney #30

Day 6: 16 August 2019 ~ Standing Stones of Stenness

The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Location: The Standing Stones of Stenness, Orkney, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-16
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • F-Stop: f/5
  • Exposure Time: 1/400 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-250
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld

The Standing Stones of Stenness, is a Neolithic monument five miles northeast of Stromness on the mainland of Orkney, Scotland. It may be the oldest henge site in the British Isles. Various traditions associated with the stones survived into the modern era, and they form part of the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site.

The surviving stones are on the south bank of the stream that joins the southern ends of the sea loch Loch of Stenness and the freshwater Loch of Harray. The name pronounced as stane-is in Orcadian dialect, comes from an Old Norse meaning stone headland

The Stenness Watch Stone stands outside the circle, next to the modern bridge leading to the Ring of Brodgar.

Although the site today lacks the encircling ditch and bank, excavation has shown that this used to be a henge monument, possibly the oldest in the British Isles. The stones are thin slabs, approximately 30 cm thick, with sharply angled tops. Four, up to about 5 m high, were elements of a stone circle of up to 12 stones, laid out in an ellipse about 32 m diameter on a leveled platform of 44 m diameter surrounded by a ditch. 

The ditch is cut into the rock by as much as 2 m and is 7 m wide, surrounded by an earth bank, with a single entrance causeway on the north side. The entrance faces towards the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement adjacent to the Loch of Harray. 

The Watch Stone stands outside the circle to the northwest and is 5.6 m high. Once there were at least two stones there. The stump of a second stone was found in the 1930s. 

Other smaller stones include a square stone set in the center where cremated bone, charcoal, and pottery were found, called a “hearth.”

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen