Throwback Thursday: 15 April 2021

Today and over the next few weeks we are going back to our visit to the Augrabies Falls National Park on 11 September 2013

Augrabies Falls National Park is a national park located around the Augrabies Falls, about 120 km west of Upington in the Northern Cape Province, South Africa. It was established in 1966.

The Augrabies Falls National Park covers an area of 820 km² and stretches along the Orange River. The area is very arid. The waterfall is about 60 meters high and is awe-inspiring when the river is in flood. The gorge below the falls averages about 240 m deep and runs for 18 kilometers. The gorge provides an impressive example of erosion into a granitic basement.

Augrabies Falls National Park
Augrabies Falls National Park
Augrabies Falls National Park
Augrabies Falls National Park
Augrabies Falls National Park
Wild Tamarisk, Augrabies Falls National Park
Mom, Augrabies Falls National Park
Mom and Dad exploring, Augrabies Falls National Park
Augrabies Falls National Park
Augrabies Falls National Park
Augrabies Falls National Park
Cape Robin Chat, Augrabies Falls National Park
Rock Dassies, Hyrax, Augrabies Falls National Park
Rock Dassies, Hyrax, Augrabies Falls National Park
Rock Dassies, Hyrax, Augrabies Falls National Park
Rock Dassies, Hyrax, Augrabies Falls National Park
Rock Dassies, Hyrax, Augrabies Falls National Park
Augrabies Falls National Park
Weaver Nest, Augrabies Falls National Park

“It’s the little memories that will last a lifetime.”  ~Unknown

That’s it for now, friends. Thank you very much for traveling back in time with me.

Have a fabulous day. 

Keep safe and healthy.

Coreen

Wordless Wednesday: 14 April 2021

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Alford #2

Day 5: 15 August 2019 – Exploring Alford

While exploring Alford one of the places on my list was the Alford Valley Railway Museum. When we got there it was closed for business. I must say I was very disappointed. I was looking forward to visit and ride on the train. I took some photos of the grounds although there was not much to see.

Alford Valley Railway Museum

The construction of the Alford Valley Railway began in 1856 and the line opened in 1859. It ran in a westerly direction from Kintore, a station on the line from Aberdeen to Inverness. The line served Kemnay Quarry and three other granite quarries in the area.

The current station building is on the site of the original granite structure which was demolished after British Rail closed the line. The passenger platform is the original. A small railway museum is housed in the railway station building. The original locomotive shed was situated to the east of the station but this has also now been demolished. To the west of the station the granite carriage shed of the previous railway is now used by the Alford Valley Railway.

Alford Valley Railway, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Valley Railway, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Valley Railway, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Valley Railway Museum in background. Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden

Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden

In 1998 at the instigation of Alford and District Rotary Club an adhoc committee consisting of representatives from all the local voluntary organizations was established. Their purpose was to create a lasting memorial to the start of the new millennium. Suggestions was made and they decided on a sculpture garden.

The land was provided by Aberdeenshire Council and the artist Louise Gardner did the layout of the garden and also created the sculptures. A local quarrying company was asked to provide pieces of Corrennie Granite which they kindly donated and conveyed to the Scottish Sculpture Workshop at Lumsden.

The garden was officially opened on 25 October 2003.

The largest stone shows a family group whit the man leading his wife and child into the new millennium. The man looking back to the second stone where domestic animals represent agriculture on which Alford was founded. When the railway reached the Village it became the natural gathering point for livestock and produce from surrounding farms destined for markets in the south.

Stone 1: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 1: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 1: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 2: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 2: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

The various animals and birds on the third Stone represent nature on which all of life depends.

Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

Children at Alford Academy were asked to create clay shields displaying some aspect of Alford or its surroundings that appealed to them. The shields, also, were taken to Lumsden where the Workshop used them to form molds for the castings of the bronzes which can be seen set into the pavement.

Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Throwback Thursday: 8 April 2021

Today we go back to 11 September 2013. We stopped at The Pink Farmstall for breakfast on our way to Augrabies Falls National Park. I just loved this farmstall, it was very interesting. The owners are very creative.

“A picture is worth a thousand words, but a memory is priceless.” ~ Unknown

That’s it for now, friends. Thank you very much for traveling back in time with me.

Have a fabulous day. 

Keep safe and healthy.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Alford #1

We left Aberdeen and took the A944 and headed for Alford. The road was not that busy and we enjoyed the beautiful landscapes along the way. I did not stop along the way because we were already running a bit late.

Day 5: 15 August 2019 – Exploring Alford

Alford is a small country town happily nestled in rural Aberdeenshire with a peaceful and tranquil feel to it.

Skirted by the beautiful River Don and surrounded by the hills of Bennachie and Coreen, the area is a great place to relax from the hustle and bustle of everyday life.

The place-name is thought to come from the Scots auld ford; its original position being on the banks of the Don. Alford gave its name to a battle of the Battle of Alford (1645). It is also the home of the Aberdeen Angus cattle breed. It is believed that the original breeding ground of the cattle was Buffal, located between Tough (Tulloch) and Craigievar nearby Alford. Another claim to fame for the town is Alford Oatmeal, ground at Montgarrie, just outside the town. 

Howe Trinity Parish Church

Designed by James Souttar and built-in 1867 as Alford Free Church.

Howe Trinity Parish Church, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

Howe Trinity Parish Church is situated at the eastern edge of the rural Aberdeenshire village of Alford, alongside the main A944 road running through the community. The church was formerly called East Church and became Howe Trinity in 1999 when the parishes of Keig, Tullynessle & Forbes, and Alford were united. There is a car parking area to the front of the church, and a large, modern hall is attached to the rear.

There are houses around the church, and the manse stands to the west.

Houses surrounding the Howe Trinity Parish Church, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Houses surrounding the Howe Trinity Parish Church, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

The rectangular church is tall and narrow, with a square tower at the northwest corner, and there is a larger 21st-century hall complex joined to the rear of the church building. The church has granite walls, composed of large, roughly-finished (‘rock-faced) blocks, with paler bands of granite used for decoration. The steeply-pitched roof is slated.

The tall north gable and tower of the church form the principal elevation. The gable has a single window, composed of three lancets (pointed-arch), the central one of which is larger. The windows have small, latticed panes of glass. There are three bands or courses of paler granite; the top one rises into a relieving arch above the window to spread the weight of the gable around the weaker window. Above, in the gable head, is an oval window, again with latticed glazing. Mounted on the apex is a tall, stone cross finial. The attached tower, to the northwest, is slightly advanced from the gable and the side elevation. It is square on plan and of two stages. There may have been a tall spire planned to sit on top of the tower, but this was never carried out. There is a chamfered, recessed, pointed-arch doorway at the base of the tower. The double-leaf door has large, decorative metal hinge plates. Above is a pointed-arch (lancet) window. The west face of the tower has a small round window at ground level and a lancet window above. There is a sloping stringcourse above the doorway and a simple cornice at the top of the tower.

Windows of Howe Trinity Parish Church, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

The above information on Howe Trinity Parish Church I got from the POWiS website.

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Wordless Wednesday: 7 April 2021

Throwback Thursday: 1 April 2021

Today we go back to 2013-09-11. We used Upington as our base for the next few days. These photos was taken when we traveled to Augrabies Waterfall.

On Route to Augrabies Waterfall
On Route to Augrabies Waterfall
On Route to Augrabies Waterfall
On Route to Augrabies Waterfall
On Route to Augrabies Waterfall
On Route to Augrabies Waterfall
Akkerboom Farmstall
Akkerboom Farmstall
Akkerboom Farmstall
Akkerboom Farmstall

“A picture is worth a thousand words, but a memory is priceless.” ~ Unknown

That’s it for now, friends. Thank you very much for traveling back in time with me.

Have a fabulous day. 

Keep safe and healthy.

Coreen

Wordless Wednesday: 31 March 2021

Somewhere on N7, Western Cape

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Aberdeen #6

Day 5: 15 August 2019 Exploring Aberdeen

St Andrew’s Cathedral

St Andrew’s Cathedral or the Cathedral Church of Saint Andrews is a cathedral of the Scottish Episcopal Church situated in the Scottish city of Aberdeen. It is the see of the Bishop of Aberdeen and Orkney who is the Ordinary of the Diocese of Aberdeen and Orkney.

The Cathedral is known as being the church where the first bishop of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America, Samuel Seabury was ordained in 1784. Bishop Seabury was consecrated to the episcopate in “an upper room” of the home of John Skinner, then leader of the St. Andrew’s congregation, approximately 500 meters from the present building. The site of the house used to be marked by a polished granite tablet on the wall of the former Marischal College. This has, in recent years, been moved.

The original building was designed in the perpendicular Gothic style by the architect Archibald Simpson, one of Simpson’s many commissions in the city. While three sides of the Cathedral were built out of the usual local granite, for which Aberdeen is famous, the facade of the structure, facing King Street, was built from sandstone for economical reasons despite Simpson’s opposition.

The church opened in 1817 as St Andrew’s Chapel and was raised to Cathedral status in 1914.

The Church of Scotland Cathedral Church of St Machar

I got the following information from the St Machar Website.

“A place of worship was established in this area about 580 AD and it is highly likely that it was indeed on its current location. A stone carved with a Celtic cross – a clear indication of the site’s Celtic roots  – believed to have been associated with this original church is now on display in the church.

It became a Cathedral in the 1130s when the seat of the Bishop was transferred from Mortlach, near Dufftown to Old Aberdeen under David I.  By 1165 a Norman style cathedral stood on the site.

In the 13th century the Cathedral had to undergo extensive restoration. This was started under the instruction of Bishop Cheyne (1282 to 1328). We have to thank him that the building turned out to be a fine example of a fortified Kirk.

What we do know is that shortly after the war of independence – which left its mark not just on Aberdeen (Edward III sacked it in 1336), but also on the Cathedral – construction was continued under among others Bishop Alexander Kinnimund (1355-80) and Bishop William Elphinstone (1431-1514). In his lifetime the cathedral was constructed to its biggest form. The nave and towers on the west – which form the modern church were only one part. To the east of the nave, there was a crossing which had one large central tower. There was also a choir to its east and transepts pointing north and south. In 1520 a ceiling of paneled oak bearing 48 heraldic shields was commissioned by Bishop Gavin Dunbar (1518-1532).

It must have been a glorious sight when the Church was finally complete in 1530.

It is thought that nearly 30 canons – each with their own manse – performed the religious and practical duties at the Cathedral. St Machar’s had a key role in the political but especially in the spiritual life of the North-East of Scotland.

With the reformation of 1560 change came. The Cathedral lost its status as cathedral. Its treasures were taken and its land sold. Once immediately before and during the reformation and then later when the conflict with Charles I escalated, it recovered its cathedral status.

This also sheds some light on the question why St Machar’s is referred to as Cathedral. While it is a part of the Church of Scotland, a Presbyterian church, which has neither bishops nor cathedrals, St Machar’s is a cathedral only by name: The Cathedral Church of St Machar. This seemingly trivial distinction is nevertheless a reminder of serious conflicts which more than once in the in the middle of the 17th century led to civil wars that engulfed Scotland, England and Ireland.

General Monck led Cromwell’s troops into Aberdeen in 1654. Looking for material for his fort he removed the stones from the empty and destroyed bishop’s palace to the east and from the disused and probably never finished choir. It is not clear if this led to a weakening of the base of the central tower. A storm in 1688 caused its fall into the transepts and crossing, and damaged the nave as well.

It took until 1953 to bring the east end into the state that it is today complete with three stained glass windows.”

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Throwback Thursday: 25 March 2021

Today we leave Goegap Nature Reserve and head towards Upington, where we will be spending the next few days.

On Route to Upington
On Route to Upington
On Route to Upington
On Route to Upington
On Route to Upington
Sociable Weaver Nest
Sociable Weaver Nest
On Route to Upington
On Route to Upington
Sociable Weaver Nest
Sociable Weaver Nest
Crow
Crow
Sociable Weaver Nest
Sociable Weaver
Sociable Weaver
Sociable Weaver
Sociable Weaver
Sociable Weaver
Sociable Weaver
Sociable Weaver Nest
On Route to Upington
On Route to Upington
On Route to Upington
On Route to Upington
On Route to Upington
On Route to Upington
Stop and Go on Route to Upington

That’s it for now, friends. Thank you very much for traveling back in time with me.

Have a fabulous day. 

Keep safe and healthy.

Coreen