14 August 2019: Day 4 of our Grand Tour of Scotland: Part 11 – Arbroath

We left Dundee on our way to Arbroath. We spend so much time in Dundee that time was running out and, we had to start making decisions about what places of interest on our list we were going to skip. The roads were busy and, I took the wrong turn off. Had to get someplace to turn around to at least take a photo of the Declaration of Arbroath.

Arbroath was the location of the Battle of Arbroath in 1446. A series of disagreements between the Chief Justiciary of Arbroath, Alexander Lindsay, third Earl of Crawford, and Bishop James Kennedy of St Andrews resulted in Lindsay sacking the bishop’s lands and burning his properties. Lindsay was excommunicated for his troubles and, it was felt that this was incompatible with his role as Chief Justiciary. The monks of Arbroath Abbey selected Alexander Ogilvy of Inverquharity as his replacement and, the insult led to a pitched battle in the town, leaving 500 dead, including Lindsay and Ogilvy. Large parts of Arbroath were destroyed in the aftermath by the Lindsay family.

Declaration of Arbroath
Declaration of Arbroath
Arbroath
Arbroath
Arbroath
Arbroath
Arbroath
Arbroath

Arbroath Abbey was founded in 1178 by King William the Lion for a group of Tironensian Benedictine monks from Kelso Abbey. It was consecrated in 1197 with a dedication to the deceased Saint Thomas Becket, whom the king had met at the English court. It was William’s only foundation — he was buried before the high altar of the church in 1214.

The last Abbot was Cardinal David Beaton, who in 1522 succeeded his uncle James to become Archbishop of St Andrews. The Abbey is cared for by Historic Environment Scotland and is open to the public throughout the year. The distinctive red sandstone ruins stand at the top of the High Street in Arbroath. Unfortunately, dad and I ran out of time and, the Abbey had already closed. I took some photos through the fence. 

Arbroath Abbey
Arbroath Abbey
On route from Arbroath
On route from Arbroath

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

“Stop dreaming about your bucket list and start living it.” ~Annette White

14 August 2019: Day 4 of our Grand Tour of Scotland: Part 10 – Dundee

Good day everyone,

Hope you are all having a great day so far. I decided to share the last part of our visit to Dundee with you today. I know 2 days in a row…. We drove around Dundee trying to check off the different places of interest on our list.

Dudhope Castle

Dudhope Castle is an extended late medieval tower house located on the southern face of Dundee Law in Dundee.
It was built in the late 13th century by the Scrymgeour family, with the original castle being a smaller tower house.
In 1792 the castle was rented in an attempt to use it as a woolen factory, although the plan never came to fruition. In 1795 the park and the grounds were leased to the Board of Ordnance. They used Dudhope as a barracks for 95 years, from 1796 to 1879. Additional buildings were constructed, including a hospital, officer’s quarters, stables, and guard-rooms. The castle itself was used to accommodate 400 soldiers. The Board of Ordnance finally abandoned it in 1881.

Dudhope Castle
Dudhope Castle
Dudhope Castle

Steeple Church

The Tower is the oldest part of the structure, dating from the 15th century. Over centuries several church buildings have been erected and have fallen on the site. The present Steeple Church dates from 1789. The other parts of the building on the east side, the Mary Slessor Centre and Dundee Parish Church (St. Mary’s ), were built in 1840 after a fire.

Steeple Church
St Mary’s Parish Church
St. Mary’s Parish Church
Dundee
Oor Wullie’s Big Bucket Trail

Adam Duncan Statue

Admiral Adam Duncan, 1st Viscount Duncan (1 July 1731 – 4 August 1804) was a British admiral who defeated the Dutch fleet off Camperdown on 11 October 1797. This victory is considered one of the most significant actions in naval history.

Adam Duncan was born and schooled in Dundee. He joined the Royal Navy, following in the footsteps of his uncle, Captain Robert Haldane. He went on to serve under him on HMS Trial and HMS Shoreham. In 1755 he was promoted to the rank of lieutenant, then in 1759 to a commander.

In 1763 Duncan returned home on half-pay. Despite his repeated efforts to gain another naval command, he spent much of the next fifteen years on the family estate at Lundie or in Dundee. On 6 June 1777, he married Henrietta. His father-in-law pulled some strings and, in late 1778, he was given command of HMS Suffolk and then of HMS Monarch.

Duncan remained in command of the North Sea fleet until he retired in 1801. He died three years later at the age of 73 and was buried in Lundie.

Adam Duncan Statue
Adam Duncan Statue
Adam Duncan Statue
Oor Wullie’s Big Bucket Trail

St. Paul’s Cathedral

St. Paul’s Cathedral is an Anglican cathedral in the city of Dundee, Scotland. It is the cathedral and administrative center of the Diocese of Brechin in the Scottish Episcopal Church.

In 1847, Alexander Penrose Forbes was elected new Bishop of Brechin and chose to make Dundee his permanent residence.

The foundation stone of the cathedral was laid on 21 July 1853 and, it was completed in 1855. It was designed by George Gilbert Scott and is in the style of the Middle or Decorated period of Gothic architecture. There is a peal of 8 bells; the tenor bell weighs 23 cwt.

The total cost of the building exceeded £14,000, and ten years passed before the congregation could pay off all the debts incurred. The church was dedicated on All Saints Day, 1 November 1865. In 1905 St.Paul’s status was raised to cathedral.

St Paul’s Cathedral
St Paul’s Cathedral
St Paul’s Cathedral
Dundee

Mains Castle

Mains Castle (also known as Claverhouse Castle or Fintry Castle) is a 16th-century castle in Dundee, Scotland. It consists of several buildings surrounding a courtyard, although several of the original western buildings no longer exist. The family lived in the northern and eastern buildings, with the servants occupying the southern quarters. The castle also has a large, six-floor, square tower house with dressed cornerstones, which is typical of 16th-century construction.

Mains Castle
Mains Castle
Mains Castle
Mains Castle
Mains Castle

Claypotts Castle

Claypotts Castle is a late medieval castle in the suburban West Ferry area of Dundee, Scotland. It is one of the best-preserved examples of a 16th-century Z-plan tower house in Scotland. Now surrounded by modern housing, the castle is maintained as an Ancient Monument by Historic Environment Scotland.

It was built by John Strachan around 1569–1588 according to dates inscribed on stones that make up parts of the castle, which make its construction longer than usual for such a small building. The Strachan family leased the land from the Tironensian Abbey of Lindores starting in the early 16th century.

The legend has it that the castle was once home to an industrious brownie who helped the servants with their work, but that he left in disgust because of a lazy kitchen maid.

Claypotts Castle
Claypotts Castle
Claypotts Castle
Claypotts Castle
Claypotts Castle

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

“The world is a book, and those who do not travel read only one page.” ~Saint Augustine

14 August 2019: Day 4 of our Grand Tour of Scotland: Part 9 – Dundee

Good day friends,

It’s been a while since I shared a post on our Grand Tour of Scotland. I think today is the day.

We continue our visit in Dundee. We headed up to Dundee Law. The views was breathtaking.

The Dundee Law is a hill in the center of Dundee. It is what remains of a volcanic sill and, it is the highest point in the center of Dundee. With a large war memorial at its summit, it is the most prominent feature on the local skyline.

Dundee Law comes from the Gaelic word for the mound. Lava was forced through fissures in old red sandstone from a volcanic area miles to the west. Actions by subsequent rain, wind, and ice movements eroded the sandstone. The glaciers of the ice ages deposited more debris around the base creating a crag and tail. The shallow gradient of the slopes on the north and eastern sides of it suggest a northeasterly movement of ice flows. The hill’s summit is over 500 feet above sea level.

Views of Dundee from Dundee Law
Views of Dundee from Dundee Law


On 16 May 1925, a war memorial for the fallen in both World War 1 and 2 was unveiled on Dundee Law.

War Memorial
War Memorial
War Memorial
Views of Harbor from Dundee Law
Views of Harbor from Dundee Law
Views of Dundee from Dundee Law
Views of V&A Museum from Dundee Law
Views of V&A Museum from Dundee Law
Views of Tay Bridge from Dundee Law
Views of Tay Bridge from Dundee Law
Views of Dundee from Dundee Law
Views of Tay river from Dundee Law
Views of Tay Rail Bridge from Dundee Law
Views of Tay Rail Bridge from Dundee Law
Oor Wullies Big Bucket Trail
Oor Wullies Big Bucket Trail
Oor Wullies Big Bucket Trail

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

“The world is a book, and those who do not travel read only one page.” ~Saint Augustine

14 August 2019: Day 4 of our Grand Tour of Scotland: Part 8 – Dundee

Good day everyone,
I hope you are all still in good health and that you are having a fabulous day.
Today we are back in Dundee again. After we visited the RRS Discovery, we drove to the Magdalen Bandstand.
In 1890 they built The Magdalen Bandstand in one of the oldest parks in Dundee, the Magdalene Green Park. The bandstand became an icon of Dundee. On Summer Sundays, you can enjoy live music from the bandstand.
Views of the Tay rail bridge are on the left of the bandstand on the other side of the Tay River, the Fife Skyline.

Oor Wullies Big Bucket Trail Statue
Oor Wullies Big Bucket Trail Statue
Magdalene Bandstand
Beautiful Corner Building

Between 1869 to 1870, the McCheyne Memorial Church; was erected on Perth Road. a Muscular Gothic Church with Steeple. The architect of this magnificent church was Frederick Thomas Pilkington.
On 20 September 1999, The Dundee Courier reports that the church’s congregation is to merge with that of Roseangle Ryehill and, the church is to close.
Before closure in 1999, also known as St Peters McCheyne Church, having combined with St Peters Church, which celebrated evangelist Rev Robert Murray McCheyne preached from 1836-43.
The church of Scotland sold the church to a private individual in December 2000.

St Peters McCheyne Church
St Peters McCheyne Church
St Peters McCheyne Church
St Peters McCheyne Church
St Peters McCheyne Church
St Peters McCheyne Church
Corner Stone McCheyne Memorial Church
Apartement Buildings

I have been looking for information on the Blackness Community Library, but did not have much luck. It is such a beautiful building. It is shame that there are not more information on it. Not sure if the name changed and that I am looking in the wrong places. Google was not much help.

Blackness Community Library
Blackness Community Library
Blackness Community Library

Up the road from the Blackness Community Library is the Logie & St. John’s (Cross) Church. Another beautiful building.

Logie & St. John’s (Cross) Church
Logie & St. John’s (Cross) Church
Logie & St. John’s (Cross) Church
Apartment Buildings

On our way to Dundee Law I saw this beautiful church on the left of the road. The streets are so narrow I had to park in the driveway of one of the house just to take a few photos of this beautiful church.

St David’s High Kirk
St David’s High Kirk
St David’s High Kirk
Views from St David’s High Kirk

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

“The world is a book, and those who do not travel read only one page.” ~Saint Augustine

14 August 2019: Day 4 of our Grand Tour of Scotland: Part 7 – Dundee

Good day,

Today I am sharing some of the photo’s taken while exploring Dundee. We visited a few places of interest in Dundee and, I will break it up in different posts.

Alexandra Fountain
Alexandra Fountain
Seaplane Mercury Commemoration

The Tay Road Bridge is one of the longest road bridges in Europe. It was opened in 1966 when it replaced the old Tay Ferry. The 2,250m bridge carries the A92 road across the Firth of Tay from Newport-on-Tay in FIFE to Dundee in Scotland.

Tay Road Bridge
Tay Road Bridge
Tay Rail Bridge
View from Seaplane Mercury Commemoration

The V&A design museum in Dundee was built in the form of a ship and was design by Kengo Kuma. The V&A Dundee is the first design museum in Scotland and the first Victoria and Albert museum outside London.

V&A Design Museum
RRS Compass
RRS Discovery Compass

The Royal Research Ship (RRS), Discovery is moored at Discovery Point in Dundee. It was built in the city in 1900, RRS Discovery was the ship, which carried Captain Scott on his first expedition across the Antarctic. For more information on the RRS Discovery please visit their Website.

The RRS Discovery
RRS Discovery
RRS Discovery
Oor Wullie’s Big Bucket Trail Statue
OOR Wullie’s Big Bucket Trail Statue

Thank you very much for taking the time to have a look at my work.
Have a fabulous day. Till next time, please stay safe and healthy.

Coreen

14 August 2019: Day 4 of our Grand Tour of Scotland: Part 5 – St Andrews

Good day everyone,

It is a beautiful day here in South Africa. Hope you are all doing great and are staying positive.

Let’s continue our Grand Tour of Scotland and the last part of St Andrews. I know I did not cover all the attractions there is to see. This will be fixed in the future.

After we left St Andrews Cathedral we went to the Martyr’s Memorial and St James Church.

The Martyr’s Monument was built to commemorate the Protestant figures who was martyred in St Andrews during 1520 to 1560. It also highlights the important role the town St Andrews played in the Reformation. The views from the monument is beautiful. I can’t get over the beautiful architecture and colors of the buildings. The gardens are well maintained and beautiful.

Martyr’s Memorial
Beautiful buildings
Gardens at Martyr’s Memorial
Views from Martyr’s Memorial

Down the road from the Martyr’s Memorial I spotted the tower of the St James Catholic Church. I decided that I want to go and have a look at it. I was not disappointed. The only regret I had was all the cars in front of the Church.

Views of St James Catholic Church
St James Catholic Church
St James Catholic Church
St James Catholic Church
St James Catholic Church
Street views
St James Catholic Church
Leaving St Andrews

Thank you for joining us on this last few minutes spent in the beautiful town of St Andrews.

Our next stop is in the Dairsie area.

Have a great day and stay safe. Till next time.

Coreen

“If you can dream it, you can do it.”

Walt Disney

14 August 2019: Day 4 of our Grand Tour of Scotland: Part 4 – St Andrews Cathedral

Good day everyone,

Hope you are all still staying safe and are healthy.

Our next stop in St Andrews was the St Andrews Cathedral.

The remains of St Andrews Cathedral shows how impressive it used to be.  It was built in 1158 and became the center of the Medieval Catholic Church in Scotland. It fell into disuse and ruin after the Catholic mass was outlawed during the 16th-century. 

 It is currently a monument in the custody of Historic Environment Scotland. The ruins indicate that the building was approximately 119 m long, and is the largest church to have been built in Scotland.

We enjoyed our visit very much and spend about 2 hours exploring and as you can see I took a lot of photos.

Thank you for joining us on our visit to St Andrews Cathedral. Hope you enjoyed it just as much as we did.

Keep safe. Till next time.

Coreen

“If you can dream it, you can do it.”

Walt Disney

14 August 2019: Day 4 of our Grand Tour of Scotland: Part 3 – St Andrews

Good day everyone,
It is cold and wet here in South Africa this morning. Last year this time I was busy packing the last of my things and weighing our suitcases for our holiday in Scotland.

I can’t believe that the time went by so fast. The worst of it all is, I am not even halfway through editing all my photos. I better get working on that. I will still be posting about our first trip to Scotland for a long time. I am enjoying editing, posting photos, and stories of that day. It’s like I am back in Scotland.

Today I am going to share the rest of my photos of St Andrews.

Molly Malones
Crow on St Leonard’s Church

The blue door of the Lions House caught my attention when I got closer to take a photo I saw the lions and the name of the house it is very appropriate.

The Lions House
The Lions House
The Lions House
The Lions House

My next stop was the Holy Trinity Church. Another beautiful church with lots of detail. It’s a shame I did not have enough time to capture every little detail as I would like too.

Holy Trinity Church
Holy Trinity Church
Holy Trinity Church
Holy Trinity Church
Holy Trinity Church
Holy Trinity Church
Holy Trinity Church
Holy Trinity Church
Holy Trinity Church
Holy Trinity Church
Holy Trinity Church
Holy Trinity Church
Holy Trinity Church
Holy Trinity Church
Holy Trinity Church
Holy Trinity Church
Holy Trinity Church
Holy Trinity Church
Holy Trinity Church
Holy Trinity Church
Holy Trinity Church
Holy Trinity Church
Holy Trinity Church
Holy Trinity Church
Holy Trinity Church
Holy Trinity Church

I love to capture the old buildings with their unique characteristics, for example, this corner bookstore.

Here are just a few more buildings that caught my eye on my way back to the car.

Our next stop the Blackfriars Chapel.

Blackfriars Chapel
Blackfriars Chapel
Blackfriars Chapel
Blackfriars Chapel
Oor Wullie at the Blackfriars Chapel
Madras College
Madras College
Madras College
Madras College
St Andrews Baptist Church
St Andrews Baptist Church

Thank you for joining me on my walk through St Andrews.
Our next stop was St Andrew’s Cathedral. But that is a post all on its own.

Till next time. Stay safe.

Coreen

“If you can dream it, you can do it.”

Walt Disney

14 August 2019: Day 4 of our Grand Tour of Scotland: Part 2 – St Andrews

Good day everyone,

Hope you are all still healthy. This week was very busy with my studies and finishing up editing work for clients.

For the next few days, I can concentrate on editing our Scotland vacation.
Let’s continue our Grand Tour of Scotland. Today I am sharing with you the photos I took while exploring St Andrews.

Dad was still not feeling up to walking, and he stayed in the car while I explored and took some photos of the surroundings.

My first stop was St Leonard’s Parish Church. On my next visit to Scotland, I am definitely going to make a point of it to go inside the churches to capture the interiors as well.

St Leonard’s Parish Church
St Leonard’s Parish Church
St Leonard’s Parish Church
St Leonard’s Parish Church
St Leonard’s Parish Church
St Leonard’s Parish Church
St Leonard’s Parish Church
St Leonard’s Parish Church Bell

While I was exploring, I noticed the different types of stone and brick walls. It really stood out to me.

Patched wall

Up next are some random photos of the buildings and houses.

My next stop was the Victory Memorial Hall. The blue door and entry of the hall caught my eye immediately. I searched online for more information about the Victory Memorial Hall, but shockingly, I could not find any.

Victory Memorial Hall
Beautiful blue door of the Victory Memorial Hall
Victory Memorial Hall

St Andrews has so many beautiful churches, and I only walked down one street.

The Hope Park and Martyrs Parish Church have a spectacular exterior, I can just imagine how the interior must be. The beautiful flower baskets in front of the windows really caught my eye.

Hope Park and Martyrs Parish Church
Hope Park and Martyrs Parish Church
Hope Park and Martyrs Parish Church
Hope Park and Martyrs Parish Church
Hope Park and Martyrs Parish Church
Stunning Window of Hope Park and Martyrs Parish Church
Beautiful Hanging flower baskets of the Hope Park and Martyrs Parish Church
Hope Park and Martyrs Parish Church
Stunning Blue door of the Hope Park and Martyrs Parish Church
Hope Park and Martyrs Parish Church

Thank you for exploring St Andrews with me. In my next post we will continue exploring.

Keep safe and healthy.

Till next time.

Coreen

“If you can dream it, you can do it.”

Walt Disney

14 August 2019: Day 4 of our Grand Tour of Scotland: Part 1 Knockhill Farm B&B

Good day everybody,

I am feeling much better today. I hope you are all still healthy and enjoying life to the fullest.

WOW day two on the road, but first a little of our stay and warm reception at Knockhill Farm just outside St Andrews.

Linda Wood, the owner of Knockhill Farm B&B, made us feel right at home with her friendly reception. We ran late, and she was worried that something happened to us on the way there. She even went as far and contacted Nordic Visitor, our tour agent, to find out if they had heard something.

Linda showed us to our accommodation for the evening, and we talked a bit about our day. She then told us that breakfast will be served at 8:00 AM and showed us where we must go.

Big Lounge and kitchen area

Our accommodation had a spacious lounge, with 2 comfortable couches, a television, and enough reading material to keep us busy for the night.
In the kitchen area, we had a variety of coffee and teas to choose from.

Spacious Shower and bathroom
Basket of goodies and towels

The bathroom was also very spacious and had a beautiful big walk-in shower. There were fresh bath sheets, face towels, shampoo, shower gel, and cream.

Two comfortable twin beds

The spacious bedroom had two twin beds, cupboards and, a dressing table.

After a long warm shower, I put on my PJ’s and made myself and dad a nice cup of coffee. We sat down in the lounge, dad grabbed a book and started reading and I started writing a quick blog with photos I took on the road with my phone.
When I first anticipated writing a blog every evening, I did not factor in how tired I would be after a long day on the road.

We went to bed around 10:30 PM for a well-deserved rest.

At around 5:00 AM, I woke up refreshed. I got out of bed, got dressed, and gathered all my things. I grabbed my camera and headed outside to take some photos of the farm and its surroundings.
I made dad and myself a cup of coffee then I woke him up just after 6:30 AM, giving him ample time to get ready.

Our Room The Stable

Dad finished with time to spare, and we decided to take a walk down the road.

Red champion Silene dioica
Red champion Silene dioica
Red champion Silene dioica
Red champion Silene dioica
Blue Pansy
Yellow Pansy

Thank you for joining us at Knockhill Farm B&B. Hope you enjoyed your stay just as much as we did. Our next stop St Andrews.

Till next time. Stay safe.

Coreen

“If you can dream it, you can do it.”

Walt Disney