Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #424

Hairy Coo’s along Route back to our accommodation.

One of the things I wanted to capture on our holiday in Scotland was the famous Hairy Coo’s.

This photo is of the Holy Hairy Coo’s. When we saw the photos at the back of the camera Dad and I said Holy Coo at the same time. So, these cows on Harris are called Holy Hairy Coo’s from now on. Well, that is how I will remember them anyway….

Highland Cattle aka Hairy Coos:

The Highland (Scottish Gaelic: Bò Ghàidhealach; Scots: Hielan coo) is a Scottish breed of rustic cattle. It originated in the Scottish Highlands and the Outer Hebrides islands of Scotland and has long horns and a long shaggy coat. It is a hardy breed, able to withstand the intemperate conditions in the region. The first herd-book dates from 1885; two types – a smaller island type, usually black, and a larger mainland type, usually dun – were registered as a single breed. It is reared primarily for beef, and has been exported to several other countries. Scientific name: Bos taurus Taurus.

Highland cattle descend from the Hamitic Longhorn, which were brought to Britain by Neolithic farmers in the second millennium BC, as the cattle migrated northwards through Africa and Europe. Highland cattle were historically of great importance to the economy, with the cattle being raised for meat primarily and sold in England.

The 1885 herd book describes two distinct types of Highland cattle. One was the West Highland, originating and living mostly in the Outer Hebrides, which had harsher conditions. These cattle tended to be smaller, to have black coats and, due to their more rugged environment, to have long hair. These cattle were named due to the practice of relocating them.

The other type was the mainland; these tended to be larger because their pastures provided richer nutrients. They came in a range of colors, most frequently dun or red. These types have now been crossbred so that there is no distinct difference.

Originally, small farmers kept Highlands as house cows to produce milk and for meat. The Highland cattle registry (“herd book”) was established in 1885. Although a group of cattle is generally called a herd, a group of Highland cattle is known as a “fold”. This is because in winter, the cattle were kept in open shelters made of stone called folds to protect them from the weather at night. They were also known as Kyloes in Scots.

In 1954, Queen Elizabeth ordered Highland cattle to be kept at Balmoral Castle where they are still kept today.

Since the early 20th century, breeding stock has been exported to many parts of the world, especially Australia and North America.

It is estimated that there are now around 15,000 Highland cattle in the United Kingdom.

Description:

They have long, wide horns and long, wavy, woolly coats. The usual coat color is reddish brown, seen in approximately 60% of the population; some 22% are yellow, and the remainder pale silver, black or brindle/dun.

They have an unusual double coat of hair. On the outside is the oily outer hair—the longest of any cattle breed, covering a downy undercoat. This makes them well suited to conditions in the Highlands, which have a high annual rainfall and sometimes very strong winds.

Their skill in foraging for food allows them to survive in steep mountain areas where they both graze and eat plants that many other cattle avoid. They can dig through the snow with their horns to find buried plants.

Mature bulls can weigh up to 800 kilograms (1,800 pounds) and heifers can weigh up to 500 kilograms (1,100 pounds). Cows typically have a height of 90–106 centimeters (3–3.5 ft), and bulls are typically in the range of 106–120 centimeters (3.5–4 ft). Mating occurs throughout the year with a gestation period of approximately 277–290 days. Most commonly a single calf is born, but twins are not unknown. Sexual maturity is reached at about eighteen months. Highland cattle also have a longer expected lifespan than most other breeds of cattle, up to 20 years.

Uses:

The meat of Highland cattle tends to be leaner than most beef because Highlands are largely insulated by their thick, shaggy hair rather than by subcutaneous fat. Highland cattle can produce beef at a reasonable profit from land that would otherwise normally be unsuitable for agriculture. The most profitable way to produce Highland beef is on poor pasture in their native land, the Highlands of Scotland. The meat is also gaining popularity in North America as the beef is low in cholesterol.

The beef from Highland cattle is very tender, but the market for high-quality meat has declined. To address this decline, it is common practice to breed Highland “suckler” cows with a more favorable breed such as a Shorthorn or Limousin bull. This allows the Highland cattle to produce a crossbred beef calf that has the tender beef of its mother on a carcass shape of more commercial value at slaughter. These crossbred beef suckler cows inherit the hardiness, thrift and mothering capabilities of their Highland dams and the improved carcass configuration of their sires. Such crossbred sucklers can be further crossbred with a modern beef bull such as a Limousin or Charolais to produce high quality beef.

For show purposes, Highland cattle are sometimes groomed with oils and conditioners to give their coats a fluffy appearance that is more apparent in calves; it leads some outside the industry to call them “fluffy cows”. Many also call the cows “hairy cows” due to their thick coats.

Highland Cattle aka Holy Hairy Coo’s, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

Information about photo:

  • Location: Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/250 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-125
  • Focal Length: 90mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. ☕ I am busy saving for a few upcoming Landscape Photography Trips to Namibia and a few local National Parks here in South Africa. The most important one is honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland and capture the beautiful landscapes and Puffins. Your help to make these trips a reality would be much appreciated in today’s economy.

Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #423

Hairy Coo’s along Route back to our accommodation.

One of the things I wanted to capture on our holiday in Scotland was the famous Hairy Coo’s.

This photo is of the Holy Hairy Coo’s. When we saw the photos at the back of the camera Dad and I said Holy Coo at the same time. So, these cows on Harris are called Holy Hairy Coo’s from now on. Well, that is how I will remember them anyway….

Highland Cattle aka Hairy Coos:

The Highland (Scottish Gaelic: Bò Ghàidhealach; Scots: Hielan coo) is a Scottish breed of rustic cattle. It originated in the Scottish Highlands and the Outer Hebrides islands of Scotland and has long horns and a long shaggy coat. It is a hardy breed, able to withstand the intemperate conditions in the region. The first herd-book dates from 1885; two types – a smaller island type, usually black, and a larger mainland type, usually dun – were registered as a single breed. It is reared primarily for beef, and has been exported to several other countries. Scientific name: Bos taurus Taurus.

Highland cattle descend from the Hamitic Longhorn, which were brought to Britain by Neolithic farmers in the second millennium BC, as the cattle migrated northwards through Africa and Europe. Highland cattle were historically of great importance to the economy, with the cattle being raised for meat primarily and sold in England.

The 1885 herd book describes two distinct types of Highland cattle. One was the West Highland, originating and living mostly in the Outer Hebrides, which had harsher conditions. These cattle tended to be smaller, to have black coats and, due to their more rugged environment, to have long hair. These cattle were named due to the practice of relocating them.

The other type was the mainland; these tended to be larger because their pastures provided richer nutrients. They came in a range of colors, most frequently dun or red. These types have now been crossbred so that there is no distinct difference.

Originally, small farmers kept Highlands as house cows to produce milk and for meat. The Highland cattle registry (“herd book”) was established in 1885. Although a group of cattle is generally called a herd, a group of Highland cattle is known as a “fold”. This is because in winter, the cattle were kept in open shelters made of stone called folds to protect them from the weather at night. They were also known as Kyloes in Scots.

In 1954, Queen Elizabeth ordered Highland cattle to be kept at Balmoral Castle where they are still kept today.

Since the early 20th century, breeding stock has been exported to many parts of the world, especially Australia and North America.

It is estimated that there are now around 15,000 Highland cattle in the United Kingdom.

Description:

They have long, wide horns and long, wavy, woolly coats. The usual coat color is reddish brown, seen in approximately 60% of the population; some 22% are yellow, and the remainder pale silver, black or brindle/dun.

They have an unusual double coat of hair. On the outside is the oily outer hair—the longest of any cattle breed, covering a downy undercoat. This makes them well suited to conditions in the Highlands, which have a high annual rainfall and sometimes very strong winds.

Their skill in foraging for food allows them to survive in steep mountain areas where they both graze and eat plants that many other cattle avoid. They can dig through the snow with their horns to find buried plants.

Mature bulls can weigh up to 800 kilograms (1,800 pounds) and heifers can weigh up to 500 kilograms (1,100 pounds). Cows typically have a height of 90–106 centimeters (3–3.5 ft), and bulls are typically in the range of 106–120 centimeters (3.5–4 ft). Mating occurs throughout the year with a gestation period of approximately 277–290 days. Most commonly a single calf is born, but twins are not unknown. Sexual maturity is reached at about eighteen months. Highland cattle also have a longer expected lifespan than most other breeds of cattle, up to 20 years.

Uses:

The meat of Highland cattle tends to be leaner than most beef because Highlands are largely insulated by their thick, shaggy hair rather than by subcutaneous fat. Highland cattle can produce beef at a reasonable profit from land that would otherwise normally be unsuitable for agriculture. The most profitable way to produce Highland beef is on poor pasture in their native land, the Highlands of Scotland. The meat is also gaining popularity in North America as the beef is low in cholesterol.

The beef from Highland cattle is very tender, but the market for high-quality meat has declined. To address this decline, it is common practice to breed Highland “suckler” cows with a more favorable breed such as a Shorthorn or Limousin bull. This allows the Highland cattle to produce a crossbred beef calf that has the tender beef of its mother on a carcass shape of more commercial value at slaughter. These crossbred beef suckler cows inherit the hardiness, thrift and mothering capabilities of their Highland dams and the improved carcass configuration of their sires. Such crossbred sucklers can be further crossbred with a modern beef bull such as a Limousin or Charolais to produce high quality beef.

For show purposes, Highland cattle are sometimes groomed with oils and conditioners to give their coats a fluffy appearance that is more apparent in calves; it leads some outside the industry to call them “fluffy cows”. Many also call the cows “hairy cows” due to their thick coats.

Highland Cattle aka Holy Hairy Coo’s, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

Information about photo:

  • Location: Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/250 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-125
  • Focal Length: 90mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. ☕ I am busy saving for a few upcoming Landscape Photography Trips to Namibia and a few local National Parks here in South Africa. The most important one is honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland and capture the beautiful landscapes and Puffins. Your help to make these trips a reality would be much appreciated in today’s economy.

Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #422

Hairy Coo’s along Route back to our accommodation.

One of the things I wanted to capture on our holiday in Scotland was the famous Hairy Coo’s.

This photo is of the Holy Hairy Coo’s. When we saw the photos at the back of the camera Dad and I said Holy Coo at the same time. So, these cows on Harris are called Holy Hairy Coo’s from now on. Well, that is how I will remember them anyway….

Highland Cattle aka Hairy Coos:

The Highland (Scottish Gaelic: Bò Ghàidhealach; Scots: Hielan coo) is a Scottish breed of rustic cattle. It originated in the Scottish Highlands and the Outer Hebrides islands of Scotland and has long horns and a long shaggy coat. It is a hardy breed, able to withstand the intemperate conditions in the region. The first herd-book dates from 1885; two types – a smaller island type, usually black, and a larger mainland type, usually dun – were registered as a single breed. It is reared primarily for beef, and has been exported to several other countries. Scientific name: Bos taurus Taurus.

Highland cattle descend from the Hamitic Longhorn, which were brought to Britain by Neolithic farmers in the second millennium BC, as the cattle migrated northwards through Africa and Europe. Highland cattle were historically of great importance to the economy, with the cattle being raised for meat primarily and sold in England.

The 1885 herd book describes two distinct types of Highland cattle. One was the West Highland, originating and living mostly in the Outer Hebrides, which had harsher conditions. These cattle tended to be smaller, to have black coats and, due to their more rugged environment, to have long hair. These cattle were named due to the practice of relocating them.

The other type was the mainland; these tended to be larger because their pastures provided richer nutrients. They came in a range of colors, most frequently dun or red. These types have now been crossbred so that there is no distinct difference.

Originally, small farmers kept Highlands as house cows to produce milk and for meat. The Highland cattle registry (“herd book”) was established in 1885. Although a group of cattle is generally called a herd, a group of Highland cattle is known as a “fold”. This is because in winter, the cattle were kept in open shelters made of stone called folds to protect them from the weather at night. They were also known as Kyloes in Scots.

In 1954, Queen Elizabeth ordered Highland cattle to be kept at Balmoral Castle where they are still kept today.

Since the early 20th century, breeding stock has been exported to many parts of the world, especially Australia and North America.

It is estimated that there are now around 15,000 Highland cattle in the United Kingdom.

Description:

They have long, wide horns and long, wavy, woolly coats. The usual coat color is reddish brown, seen in approximately 60% of the population; some 22% are yellow, and the remainder pale silver, black or brindle/dun.

They have an unusual double coat of hair. On the outside is the oily outer hair—the longest of any cattle breed, covering a downy undercoat. This makes them well suited to conditions in the Highlands, which have a high annual rainfall and sometimes very strong winds.

Their skill in foraging for food allows them to survive in steep mountain areas where they both graze and eat plants that many other cattle avoid. They can dig through the snow with their horns to find buried plants.

Mature bulls can weigh up to 800 kilograms (1,800 pounds) and heifers can weigh up to 500 kilograms (1,100 pounds). Cows typically have a height of 90–106 centimeters (3–3.5 ft), and bulls are typically in the range of 106–120 centimeters (3.5–4 ft). Mating occurs throughout the year with a gestation period of approximately 277–290 days. Most commonly a single calf is born, but twins are not unknown. Sexual maturity is reached at about eighteen months. Highland cattle also have a longer expected lifespan than most other breeds of cattle, up to 20 years.

Uses:

The meat of Highland cattle tends to be leaner than most beef because Highlands are largely insulated by their thick, shaggy hair rather than by subcutaneous fat. Highland cattle can produce beef at a reasonable profit from land that would otherwise normally be unsuitable for agriculture. The most profitable way to produce Highland beef is on poor pasture in their native land, the Highlands of Scotland. The meat is also gaining popularity in North America as the beef is low in cholesterol.

The beef from Highland cattle is very tender, but the market for high-quality meat has declined. To address this decline, it is common practice to breed Highland “suckler” cows with a more favorable breed such as a Shorthorn or Limousin bull. This allows the Highland cattle to produce a crossbred beef calf that has the tender beef of its mother on a carcass shape of more commercial value at slaughter. These crossbred beef suckler cows inherit the hardiness, thrift and mothering capabilities of their Highland dams and the improved carcass configuration of their sires. Such crossbred sucklers can be further crossbred with a modern beef bull such as a Limousin or Charolais to produce high quality beef.

For show purposes, Highland cattle are sometimes groomed with oils and conditioners to give their coats a fluffy appearance that is more apparent in calves; it leads some outside the industry to call them “fluffy cows”. Many also call the cows “hairy cows” due to their thick coats.

Highland Cattle aka Holy Hairy Coo’s, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

Information about photo:

  • Location: Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/250 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-125
  • Focal Length: 90mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. ☕ I am busy saving for a few upcoming Landscape Photography Trips to Namibia and a few local National Parks here in South Africa. The most important one is honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland and capture the beautiful landscapes and Puffins. Your help to make these trips a reality would be much appreciated in today’s economy.

Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #421

Hairy Coo’s along Route back to our accommodation.

One of the things I wanted to capture on our holiday in Scotland was the famous Hairy Coo’s.

This photo is of the Holy Hairy Coo’s. When we saw the photos at the back of the camera Dad and I said Holy Coo at the same time. So, these cows on Harris are called Holy Hairy Coo’s from now on. Well, that is how I will remember them anyway….

Highland Cattle aka Hairy Coos:

The Highland (Scottish Gaelic: Bò Ghàidhealach; Scots: Hielan coo) is a Scottish breed of rustic cattle. It originated in the Scottish Highlands and the Outer Hebrides islands of Scotland and has long horns and a long shaggy coat. It is a hardy breed, able to withstand the intemperate conditions in the region. The first herd-book dates from 1885; two types – a smaller island type, usually black, and a larger mainland type, usually dun – were registered as a single breed. It is reared primarily for beef, and has been exported to several other countries. Scientific name: Bos taurus Taurus.

Highland cattle descend from the Hamitic Longhorn, which were brought to Britain by Neolithic farmers in the second millennium BC, as the cattle migrated northwards through Africa and Europe. Highland cattle were historically of great importance to the economy, with the cattle being raised for meat primarily and sold in England.

The 1885 herd book describes two distinct types of Highland cattle. One was the West Highland, originating and living mostly in the Outer Hebrides, which had harsher conditions. These cattle tended to be smaller, to have black coats and, due to their more rugged environment, to have long hair. These cattle were named due to the practice of relocating them.

The other type was the mainland; these tended to be larger because their pastures provided richer nutrients. They came in a range of colors, most frequently dun or red. These types have now been crossbred so that there is no distinct difference.

Originally, small farmers kept Highlands as house cows to produce milk and for meat. The Highland cattle registry (“herd book”) was established in 1885. Although a group of cattle is generally called a herd, a group of Highland cattle is known as a “fold”. This is because in winter, the cattle were kept in open shelters made of stone called folds to protect them from the weather at night. They were also known as Kyloes in Scots.

In 1954, Queen Elizabeth ordered Highland cattle to be kept at Balmoral Castle where they are still kept today.

Since the early 20th century, breeding stock has been exported to many parts of the world, especially Australia and North America.

It is estimated that there are now around 15,000 Highland cattle in the United Kingdom.

Description:

They have long, wide horns and long, wavy, woolly coats. The usual coat color is reddish brown, seen in approximately 60% of the population; some 22% are yellow, and the remainder pale silver, black or brindle/dun.

They have an unusual double coat of hair. On the outside is the oily outer hair—the longest of any cattle breed, covering a downy undercoat. This makes them well suited to conditions in the Highlands, which have a high annual rainfall and sometimes very strong winds.

Their skill in foraging for food allows them to survive in steep mountain areas where they both graze and eat plants that many other cattle avoid. They can dig through the snow with their horns to find buried plants.

Mature bulls can weigh up to 800 kilograms (1,800 pounds) and heifers can weigh up to 500 kilograms (1,100 pounds). Cows typically have a height of 90–106 centimeters (3–3.5 ft), and bulls are typically in the range of 106–120 centimeters (3.5–4 ft). Mating occurs throughout the year with a gestation period of approximately 277–290 days. Most commonly a single calf is born, but twins are not unknown. Sexual maturity is reached at about eighteen months. Highland cattle also have a longer expected lifespan than most other breeds of cattle, up to 20 years.

Uses:

The meat of Highland cattle tends to be leaner than most beef because Highlands are largely insulated by their thick, shaggy hair rather than by subcutaneous fat. Highland cattle can produce beef at a reasonable profit from land that would otherwise normally be unsuitable for agriculture. The most profitable way to produce Highland beef is on poor pasture in their native land, the Highlands of Scotland. The meat is also gaining popularity in North America as the beef is low in cholesterol.

The beef from Highland cattle is very tender, but the market for high-quality meat has declined. To address this decline, it is common practice to breed Highland “suckler” cows with a more favorable breed such as a Shorthorn or Limousin bull. This allows the Highland cattle to produce a crossbred beef calf that has the tender beef of its mother on a carcass shape of more commercial value at slaughter. These crossbred beef suckler cows inherit the hardiness, thrift and mothering capabilities of their Highland dams and the improved carcass configuration of their sires. Such crossbred sucklers can be further crossbred with a modern beef bull such as a Limousin or Charolais to produce high quality beef.

For show purposes, Highland cattle are sometimes groomed with oils and conditioners to give their coats a fluffy appearance that is more apparent in calves; it leads some outside the industry to call them “fluffy cows”. Many also call the cows “hairy cows” due to their thick coats.

Highland Cattle aka Holy Hairy Coo’s, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

Information about photo:

  • Location: Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/400 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-125
  • Focal Length: 200mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. ☕ I am busy saving for a few upcoming Landscape Photography Trips to Namibia and a few local National Parks here in South Africa. The most important one is honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland and capture the beautiful landscapes and Puffins. Your help to make these trips a reality would be much appreciated in today’s economy.

Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #420

Hairy Coo’s along Route back to our accommodation.

One of the things I wanted to capture on our holiday in Scotland was the famous Hairy Coo’s.

This photo is of the Holy Hairy Coo’s. When we saw the photos at the back of the camera Dad and I said Holy Coo at the same time. So, these cows on Harris are called Holy Hairy Coo’s from now on. Well, that is how I will remember them anyway….

Highland Cattle aka Hairy Coos:

The Highland (Scottish Gaelic: Bò Ghàidhealach; Scots: Hielan coo) is a Scottish breed of rustic cattle. It originated in the Scottish Highlands and the Outer Hebrides islands of Scotland and has long horns and a long shaggy coat. It is a hardy breed, able to withstand the intemperate conditions in the region. The first herd-book dates from 1885; two types – a smaller island type, usually black, and a larger mainland type, usually dun – were registered as a single breed. It is reared primarily for beef, and has been exported to several other countries. Scientific name: Bos taurus Taurus.

Highland cattle descend from the Hamitic Longhorn, which were brought to Britain by Neolithic farmers in the second millennium BC, as the cattle migrated northwards through Africa and Europe. Highland cattle were historically of great importance to the economy, with the cattle being raised for meat primarily and sold in England.

The 1885 herd book describes two distinct types of Highland cattle. One was the West Highland, originating and living mostly in the Outer Hebrides, which had harsher conditions. These cattle tended to be smaller, to have black coats and, due to their more rugged environment, to have long hair. These cattle were named due to the practice of relocating them.

The other type was the mainland; these tended to be larger because their pastures provided richer nutrients. They came in a range of colors, most frequently dun or red. These types have now been crossbred so that there is no distinct difference.

Originally, small farmers kept Highlands as house cows to produce milk and for meat. The Highland cattle registry (“herd book”) was established in 1885. Although a group of cattle is generally called a herd, a group of Highland cattle is known as a “fold”. This is because in winter, the cattle were kept in open shelters made of stone called folds to protect them from the weather at night. They were also known as Kyloes in Scots.

In 1954, Queen Elizabeth ordered Highland cattle to be kept at Balmoral Castle where they are still kept today.

Since the early 20th century, breeding stock has been exported to many parts of the world, especially Australia and North America.

It is estimated that there are now around 15,000 Highland cattle in the United Kingdom.

Description:

They have long, wide horns and long, wavy, woolly coats. The usual coat color is reddish brown, seen in approximately 60% of the population; some 22% are yellow, and the remainder pale silver, black or brindle/dun.

They have an unusual double coat of hair. On the outside is the oily outer hair—the longest of any cattle breed, covering a downy undercoat. This makes them well suited to conditions in the Highlands, which have a high annual rainfall and sometimes very strong winds.

Their skill in foraging for food allows them to survive in steep mountain areas where they both graze and eat plants that many other cattle avoid. They can dig through the snow with their horns to find buried plants.

Mature bulls can weigh up to 800 kilograms (1,800 pounds) and heifers can weigh up to 500 kilograms (1,100 pounds). Cows typically have a height of 90–106 centimeters (3–3.5 ft), and bulls are typically in the range of 106–120 centimeters (3.5–4 ft). Mating occurs throughout the year with a gestation period of approximately 277–290 days. Most commonly a single calf is born, but twins are not unknown. Sexual maturity is reached at about eighteen months. Highland cattle also have a longer expected lifespan than most other breeds of cattle, up to 20 years.

Uses:

The meat of Highland cattle tends to be leaner than most beef because Highlands are largely insulated by their thick, shaggy hair rather than by subcutaneous fat. Highland cattle can produce beef at a reasonable profit from land that would otherwise normally be unsuitable for agriculture. The most profitable way to produce Highland beef is on poor pasture in their native land, the Highlands of Scotland. The meat is also gaining popularity in North America as the beef is low in cholesterol.

The beef from Highland cattle is very tender, but the market for high-quality meat has declined. To address this decline, it is common practice to breed Highland “suckler” cows with a more favorable breed such as a Shorthorn or Limousin bull. This allows the Highland cattle to produce a crossbred beef calf that has the tender beef of its mother on a carcass shape of more commercial value at slaughter. These crossbred beef suckler cows inherit the hardiness, thrift and mothering capabilities of their Highland dams and the improved carcass configuration of their sires. Such crossbred sucklers can be further crossbred with a modern beef bull such as a Limousin or Charolais to produce high quality beef.

For show purposes, Highland cattle are sometimes groomed with oils and conditioners to give their coats a fluffy appearance that is more apparent in calves; it leads some outside the industry to call them “fluffy cows”. Many also call the cows “hairy cows” due to their thick coats.

Highland Cattle aka Holy Hairy Coo’s, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

Information about photo:

  • Location: Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/500 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-200
  • Focal Length: 155 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. ☕ I am busy saving for a few upcoming Landscape Photography Trips to Namibia and a few local National Parks here in South Africa. The most important one is honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland and capture the beautiful landscapes and Puffins. Your help to make these trips a reality would be much appreciated in today’s economy.

Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi

Black and White Photography: Harris and Lewis #95

Calanais Standing Stones, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: Jpg
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO: ISO- 500
  • Focal Length: 18mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

“Travel: It gives you a home in a thousand strange places, then leaves you a stranger in your own land “

Ibn Battuta

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my post.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. ☕ I am busy saving for a few upcoming Landscape Photography Trips to Namibia and a few local National Parks here in South Africa. The most important one is honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland and capture the beautiful landscapes and Puffins. Your help to make these trips a reality would be much appreciated in today’s economy.

Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi

Black and White Photography: Harris and Lewis #94

Calanais Standing Stones, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: Jpg
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO: ISO- 500
  • Focal Length: 18mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

“Travel: It gives you a home in a thousand strange places, then leaves you a stranger in your own land “

Ibn Battuta

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my post.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. ☕ I am busy saving for a few upcoming Landscape Photography Trips to Namibia and a few local National Parks here in South Africa. The most important one is honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland and capture the beautiful landscapes and Puffins. Your help to make these trips a reality would be much appreciated in today’s economy.

Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi

Black and White Photography: Harris and Lewis #93

Calanais Standing Stones, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: Jpg
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO: ISO- 500
  • Focal Length: 135mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

“Travel: It gives you a home in a thousand strange places, then leaves you a stranger in your own land “

Ibn Battuta

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my post.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. ☕ I am busy saving for a few upcoming Landscape Photography Trips to Namibia and a few local National Parks here in South Africa. The most important one is honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland and capture the beautiful landscapes and Puffins. Your help to make these trips a reality would be much appreciated in today’s economy.

Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi

Black and White Photography: Harris and Lewis #92

Calanais Standing Stones, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: Jpg
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO: ISO- 500
  • Focal Length: 110mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

“Travel: It gives you a home in a thousand strange places, then leaves you a stranger in your own land “

Ibn Battuta

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my post.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. ☕ I am busy saving for a few upcoming Landscape Photography Trips to Namibia and a few local National Parks here in South Africa. The most important one is honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland and capture the beautiful landscapes and Puffins. Your help to make these trips a reality would be much appreciated in today’s economy.

Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi

Black and White Photography: Harris and Lewis #91

Calanais Standing Stones, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: Jpg
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO: ISO- 500
  • Focal Length: 110mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

“Travel: It gives you a home in a thousand strange places, then leaves you a stranger in your own land “

Ibn Battuta

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my post.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. ☕ I am busy saving for a few upcoming Landscape Photography Trips to Namibia and a few local National Parks here in South Africa. The most important one is honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland and capture the beautiful landscapes and Puffins. Your help to make these trips a reality would be much appreciated in today’s economy.

Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi

Black and White Photography: Harris and Lewis #90

Calanais Standing Stones, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: Jpg
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO: ISO- 500
  • Focal Length: 50mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

“Travel: It gives you a home in a thousand strange places, then leaves you a stranger in your own land “

Ibn Battuta

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my post.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. ☕ I am busy saving for a few upcoming Landscape Photography Trips to Namibia and a few local National Parks here in South Africa. The most important one is honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland and capture the beautiful landscapes and Puffins. Your help to make these trips a reality would be much appreciated in today’s economy.

Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi

Black and White Photography: Harris and Lewis #89

Calanais Standing Stones, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: Jpg
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO: ISO- 500
  • Focal Length: 50mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

“Travel: It gives you a home in a thousand strange places, then leaves you a stranger in your own land “

Ibn Battuta

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my post.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. ☕ I am busy saving for a few upcoming Landscape Photography Trips to Namibia and a few local National Parks here in South Africa. The most important one is honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland and capture the beautiful landscapes and Puffins. Your help to make these trips a reality would be much appreciated in today’s economy.

Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi

Black and White Photography: Harris and Lewis #88

Calanais Standing Stones, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: Jpg
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO: ISO- 500
  • Focal Length: 50mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

“Travel: It gives you a home in a thousand strange places, then leaves you a stranger in your own land “

Ibn Battuta

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my post.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. ☕ I am busy saving for a few upcoming Landscape Photography Trips to Namibia and a few local National Parks here in South Africa. The most important one is honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland and capture the beautiful landscapes and Puffins. Your help to make these trips a reality would be much appreciated in today’s economy.

Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi

What do you think?????

Good afternoon, everyone,

Just popping in to say a quick hello before I continue editing, identifying and working on my series of books on flowers.

I have this idea for a series of books and I need some help. As you all know by now my favorite type of photography is landscape and flower photography.

Since Dad is not here to give me advice I am turning to my online family and friends. Please know that you have played a huge role in my life over the past few years and I love hearing from you. Although I don’t always reply to your comments, I do read them and appreciate each and every one of them. I am also very grateful for every post that you share with your friends. Okay before I forget what I came here to ask you let me get to it. I need your input on how to go forward and in categorizing my photos for my series of books.

Currently I am putting them in Files on an external Hard drive just for my book research. Let me explain.

I have a Main File, for example the Forest Iris, inside this file I put all the different files I have on Forest Iris with the date taken and the location. This means I have a file on the flower taken on different dates and locations in their separate files. If I do decide to go location by location, I would have to change my filing system a bit. To ensure I have all the information together in one file.

What do you think???

Do I publish a series of books covering different Locations like Durbanville Nature Reserve in one book, West Coast National Park in another and so on? Or do I just publish one book on each of the provinces like the Western Cape, Northern Cape, Namaqualand and so on?

I would really appreciate your input on this matter.

Just a drop in an ocean of photos of flowers I have on my hard drives and computer.

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my Post.

Thank you in advance for your advice.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.


Have a Blessed day
Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #419

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

Information about photo:

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 32 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #418

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

Information about photo:

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #417

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

Information about photo:

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #416

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

Information about photo:

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 80 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #415

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

Information about photo:

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 135 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #414

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

Information about photo:

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 110 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #413

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

Information about photo:

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 110 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #412

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

Information about photo:

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 50 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #411

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

Information about photo:

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 35 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #410

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

Information about photo:

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 35 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #409

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 35 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #408

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 50 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #407

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 50 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #406

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #405

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #404

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #403

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #402

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #401

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

A Square Crop: 15 September 2022

Black Mustard, Brassica nigra, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, Cape Town, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, Cape Town, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/400 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to have a look at my squared photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Stay safe and healthy. Till next time.

Have a Fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Black and White Photography: Harris and Lewis #87

Calanais Standing Stones, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: Jpg
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO: ISO- 500
  • Focal Length: 28mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

“Travel: It gives you a home in a thousand strange places, then leaves you a stranger in your own land “

Ibn Battuta

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Black and White Photography: Harris and Lewis #86

Dun Carloway Broch, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Location: Dun Carloway Broch, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: Jpg
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/1250 sec
  • ISO: ISO- 500
  • Focal Length: 18mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

“Travel: It gives you a home in a thousand strange places, then leaves you a stranger in your own land “

Ibn Battuta

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Black and White Photography: Harris and Lewis #85

Dun Carloway Broch, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Location: Dun Carloway Broch, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: Jpg
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/2000 sec
  • ISO: ISO- 500
  • Focal Length: 18mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

“Travel: It gives you a home in a thousand strange places, then leaves you a stranger in your own land “

Ibn Battuta

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Black and White Photography: Harris and Lewis #84

Dun Carloway Broch, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Location: Dun Carloway Broch, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: Jpg
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/1000 sec
  • ISO: ISO- 500
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

“Travel: It gives you a home in a thousand strange places, then leaves you a stranger in your own land “

Ibn Battuta

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Black and White Photography: Harris and Lewis #83

Dun Carloway Broch, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Location: Dun Carloway Broch, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: Jpg
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/1000 sec
  • ISO: ISO- 500
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

“Travel: It gives you a home in a thousand strange places, then leaves you a stranger in your own land “

Ibn Battuta

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Black and White Photography: Harris and Lewis #82

Dun Carloway Broch, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Location: Dun Carloway Broch, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: Jpg
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/2000 sec
  • ISO: ISO- 500
  • Focal Length: 28 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

“Travel: It gives you a home in a thousand strange places, then leaves you a stranger in your own land “

Ibn Battuta

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Black and White Photography: Harris and Lewis #81

Dun Carloway Broch, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Location: Dun Carloway Broch, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: Jpg
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/2000 sec
  • ISO: ISO- 500
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

“Travel: It gives you a home in a thousand strange places, then leaves you a stranger in your own land “

Ibn Battuta

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Black and White Photography: Harris and Lewis #80

Dun Carloway Broch, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Location: Dun Carloway Broch, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: Jpg
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/2000 sec
  • ISO: ISO- 500
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

“Travel: It gives you a home in a thousand strange places, then leaves you a stranger in your own land “

Ibn Battuta

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Black and White Photography: Harris and Lewis #79

Dun Carloway Broch, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Location: Dun Carloway Broch, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: Jpg
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/2000 sec
  • ISO: ISO- 500
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

“Travel: It gives you a home in a thousand strange places, then leaves you a stranger in your own land “

Ibn Battuta

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Black and White Photography: Harris and Lewis #78

Dun Carloway Broch, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Location: Dun Carloway Broch, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: Jpg
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/2000 sec
  • ISO: ISO- 500
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

“Travel: It gives you a home in a thousand strange places, then leaves you a stranger in your own land “

Ibn Battuta

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Black and White Photography: Harris and Lewis #77

Dun Carloway Broch, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Location: Dun Carloway Broch, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: Jpg
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/3200 sec
  • ISO: ISO- 500
  • Focal Length: 50 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

“Travel: It gives you a home in a thousand strange places, then leaves you a stranger in your own land “

Ibn Battuta

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #400

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 28 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #399

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 28 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #398

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 28 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #397

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 28 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #396

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 28 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.