Grand Tour Of Scotland: Alford #2

Day 5: 15 August 2019 – Exploring Alford

While exploring Alford one of the places on my list was the Alford Valley Railway Museum. When we got there it was closed for business. I must say I was very disappointed. I was looking forward to visit and ride on the train. I took some photos of the grounds although there was not much to see.

Alford Valley Railway Museum

The construction of the Alford Valley Railway began in 1856 and the line opened in 1859. It ran in a westerly direction from Kintore, a station on the line from Aberdeen to Inverness. The line served Kemnay Quarry and three other granite quarries in the area.

The current station building is on the site of the original granite structure which was demolished after British Rail closed the line. The passenger platform is the original. A small railway museum is housed in the railway station building. The original locomotive shed was situated to the east of the station but this has also now been demolished. To the west of the station the granite carriage shed of the previous railway is now used by the Alford Valley Railway.

Alford Valley Railway, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Valley Railway, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Valley Railway, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Valley Railway Museum in background. Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden

Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden

In 1998 at the instigation of Alford and District Rotary Club an adhoc committee consisting of representatives from all the local voluntary organizations was established. Their purpose was to create a lasting memorial to the start of the new millennium. Suggestions was made and they decided on a sculpture garden.

The land was provided by Aberdeenshire Council and the artist Louise Gardner did the layout of the garden and also created the sculptures. A local quarrying company was asked to provide pieces of Corrennie Granite which they kindly donated and conveyed to the Scottish Sculpture Workshop at Lumsden.

The garden was officially opened on 25 October 2003.

The largest stone shows a family group whit the man leading his wife and child into the new millennium. The man looking back to the second stone where domestic animals represent agriculture on which Alford was founded. When the railway reached the Village it became the natural gathering point for livestock and produce from surrounding farms destined for markets in the south.

Stone 1: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 1: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 1: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 2: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 2: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

The various animals and birds on the third Stone represent nature on which all of life depends.

Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

Children at Alford Academy were asked to create clay shields displaying some aspect of Alford or its surroundings that appealed to them. The shields, also, were taken to Lumsden where the Workshop used them to form molds for the castings of the bronzes which can be seen set into the pavement.

Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Alford #1

We left Aberdeen and took the A944 and headed for Alford. The road was not that busy and we enjoyed the beautiful landscapes along the way. I did not stop along the way because we were already running a bit late.

Day 5: 15 August 2019 – Exploring Alford

Alford is a small country town happily nestled in rural Aberdeenshire with a peaceful and tranquil feel to it.

Skirted by the beautiful River Don and surrounded by the hills of Bennachie and Coreen, the area is a great place to relax from the hustle and bustle of everyday life.

The place-name is thought to come from the Scots auld ford; its original position being on the banks of the Don. Alford gave its name to a battle of the Battle of Alford (1645). It is also the home of the Aberdeen Angus cattle breed. It is believed that the original breeding ground of the cattle was Buffal, located between Tough (Tulloch) and Craigievar nearby Alford. Another claim to fame for the town is Alford Oatmeal, ground at Montgarrie, just outside the town. 

Howe Trinity Parish Church

Designed by James Souttar and built-in 1867 as Alford Free Church.

Howe Trinity Parish Church, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

Howe Trinity Parish Church is situated at the eastern edge of the rural Aberdeenshire village of Alford, alongside the main A944 road running through the community. The church was formerly called East Church and became Howe Trinity in 1999 when the parishes of Keig, Tullynessle & Forbes, and Alford were united. There is a car parking area to the front of the church, and a large, modern hall is attached to the rear.

There are houses around the church, and the manse stands to the west.

Houses surrounding the Howe Trinity Parish Church, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Houses surrounding the Howe Trinity Parish Church, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

The rectangular church is tall and narrow, with a square tower at the northwest corner, and there is a larger 21st-century hall complex joined to the rear of the church building. The church has granite walls, composed of large, roughly-finished (‘rock-faced) blocks, with paler bands of granite used for decoration. The steeply-pitched roof is slated.

The tall north gable and tower of the church form the principal elevation. The gable has a single window, composed of three lancets (pointed-arch), the central one of which is larger. The windows have small, latticed panes of glass. There are three bands or courses of paler granite; the top one rises into a relieving arch above the window to spread the weight of the gable around the weaker window. Above, in the gable head, is an oval window, again with latticed glazing. Mounted on the apex is a tall, stone cross finial. The attached tower, to the northwest, is slightly advanced from the gable and the side elevation. It is square on plan and of two stages. There may have been a tall spire planned to sit on top of the tower, but this was never carried out. There is a chamfered, recessed, pointed-arch doorway at the base of the tower. The double-leaf door has large, decorative metal hinge plates. Above is a pointed-arch (lancet) window. The west face of the tower has a small round window at ground level and a lancet window above. There is a sloping stringcourse above the doorway and a simple cornice at the top of the tower.

Windows of Howe Trinity Parish Church, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

The above information on Howe Trinity Parish Church I got from the POWiS website.

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Aberdeen #6

Day 5: 15 August 2019 Exploring Aberdeen

St Andrew’s Cathedral

St Andrew’s Cathedral or the Cathedral Church of Saint Andrews is a cathedral of the Scottish Episcopal Church situated in the Scottish city of Aberdeen. It is the see of the Bishop of Aberdeen and Orkney who is the Ordinary of the Diocese of Aberdeen and Orkney.

The Cathedral is known as being the church where the first bishop of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America, Samuel Seabury was ordained in 1784. Bishop Seabury was consecrated to the episcopate in “an upper room” of the home of John Skinner, then leader of the St. Andrew’s congregation, approximately 500 meters from the present building. The site of the house used to be marked by a polished granite tablet on the wall of the former Marischal College. This has, in recent years, been moved.

The original building was designed in the perpendicular Gothic style by the architect Archibald Simpson, one of Simpson’s many commissions in the city. While three sides of the Cathedral were built out of the usual local granite, for which Aberdeen is famous, the facade of the structure, facing King Street, was built from sandstone for economical reasons despite Simpson’s opposition.

The church opened in 1817 as St Andrew’s Chapel and was raised to Cathedral status in 1914.

The Church of Scotland Cathedral Church of St Machar

I got the following information from the St Machar Website.

“A place of worship was established in this area about 580 AD and it is highly likely that it was indeed on its current location. A stone carved with a Celtic cross – a clear indication of the site’s Celtic roots  – believed to have been associated with this original church is now on display in the church.

It became a Cathedral in the 1130s when the seat of the Bishop was transferred from Mortlach, near Dufftown to Old Aberdeen under David I.  By 1165 a Norman style cathedral stood on the site.

In the 13th century the Cathedral had to undergo extensive restoration. This was started under the instruction of Bishop Cheyne (1282 to 1328). We have to thank him that the building turned out to be a fine example of a fortified Kirk.

What we do know is that shortly after the war of independence – which left its mark not just on Aberdeen (Edward III sacked it in 1336), but also on the Cathedral – construction was continued under among others Bishop Alexander Kinnimund (1355-80) and Bishop William Elphinstone (1431-1514). In his lifetime the cathedral was constructed to its biggest form. The nave and towers on the west – which form the modern church were only one part. To the east of the nave, there was a crossing which had one large central tower. There was also a choir to its east and transepts pointing north and south. In 1520 a ceiling of paneled oak bearing 48 heraldic shields was commissioned by Bishop Gavin Dunbar (1518-1532).

It must have been a glorious sight when the Church was finally complete in 1530.

It is thought that nearly 30 canons – each with their own manse – performed the religious and practical duties at the Cathedral. St Machar’s had a key role in the political but especially in the spiritual life of the North-East of Scotland.

With the reformation of 1560 change came. The Cathedral lost its status as cathedral. Its treasures were taken and its land sold. Once immediately before and during the reformation and then later when the conflict with Charles I escalated, it recovered its cathedral status.

This also sheds some light on the question why St Machar’s is referred to as Cathedral. While it is a part of the Church of Scotland, a Presbyterian church, which has neither bishops nor cathedrals, St Machar’s is a cathedral only by name: The Cathedral Church of St Machar. This seemingly trivial distinction is nevertheless a reminder of serious conflicts which more than once in the in the middle of the 17th century led to civil wars that engulfed Scotland, England and Ireland.

General Monck led Cromwell’s troops into Aberdeen in 1654. Looking for material for his fort he removed the stones from the empty and destroyed bishop’s palace to the east and from the disused and probably never finished choir. It is not clear if this led to a weakening of the base of the central tower. A storm in 1688 caused its fall into the transepts and crossing, and damaged the nave as well.

It took until 1953 to bring the east end into the state that it is today complete with three stained glass windows.”

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Aberdeen #5

Day 5: 15 August 2019 Exploring Aberdeen

Central Library
Views of Aberdeen, Scotland
Views of Aberdeen, Scotland

Robert Burns Statue

This bronze by Henry Bain Smith (1857-1893) was cast in July 1892 and unveiled two months later.

The daisy held by the national bard recalls his popular poem “To a Mountain Daisy”, written at the plough in April 1786. Burns personally identified with the daisy’s fate and despairingly reflected on his own circumstances at the time.

“Robert Burns (25 January 1759 – 21 July 1796) (also known as Robbie Burns, Rabbie Burns, Scotland’s favorite son, the Ploughman Poet) He is widely regarded as the national poet of Scotland and is celebrated worldwide. He is the best known of the poets who have written in the Scots language, although much of his writing is also in English and a light Scots dialect, accessible to an audience beyond Scotland. He also wrote in standard English, and in these writings his political or civil commentary is often at its bluntest.

He is regarded as a pioneer of the Romantic movement, and after his death he became a great source of inspiration to the founders of both liberalism and socialism, and a cultural icon in Scotland and among the Scottish Diaspora around the world. Celebration of his life and work became almost a national charismatic cult during the 19th and 20th centuries, and his influence has long been strong on Scottish literature.

Robert Burns Statue, Aberdeen, Scotland
Robert Burns Statue, Aberdeen, Scotland

George, Duke of Gordon Statue

Located in the center of Golden Square in Aberdeen, the B-listed statue of George Gordon, 5th and last Duke of Gordon (1770 – 1836) is notable in several respects. Originally erected on Castlegate in 1844, it was the first large public statue in Aberdeen, but also said to be the first granite statue in Britain. It was later set in Golden Square in 1952.

Designed by Thomas Campbell (1790-1858) of Edinburgh, this work was the first large public statue in Aberdeen and the first statue in Britain to be carved in granite. Monumental sculptors Macdonald and Leslie used their specialised tools and expertise to copy Campbell’s model and skilfully make the statue from one block. 

George was born in Edinburgh on 2 February 1770. He was educated at Eton. He became a professional soldier and rose to the rank of general. As Marquess of Huntly, he served with the guards in Flanders from 1793 to 1794. He commanded the 92nd Highlanders, which was originally raised by his father the Alexander Gordon as the 100 Regiment of Foot 1794 and renumbered in 1798.

He was a freemason and was Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Scotland from 1792 to 1794. He was Member of Parliament for Eye from 1806 to 1807. On 11 April 1807, at the age of 37, he was summoned to the House of Lords in one of the minor peerages of his father (Baron Gordon of Huntley, co. Gloucester). He was appointed a Privy Counsellor in 1830, was Keeper of the Great Seal of Scotland from 1828 to 1830 (a post that his father had held until 1827), and from 1827 to 1836 was Governor of Edinburgh Castle.

George, Duke of Gordon Statue, Aberdeen, Scotland
George, Duke of Gordon Statue, Aberdeen, Scotland
Views of Aberdeen, Scotland
Castle Street, Aberdeen, Scotland
Castle Street, Aberdeen, Scotland

In 2011 Trinity Church broke away from the Church of Scotland to join the International Presbyterian Church. But in the process it lost its meeting place of High Church Hilton, which is owned by its former denomination. It has been holding gatherings in hotel ballrooms, community centers and members’ front rooms ever since.

The congregation has been handed the keys to Queen Street Church, Aberdeen.

“We are a church family made up of people from different parts of the city and from all over the world. We are part of the International Presbyterian Church, which means we are led by elders and we work closely with other gospel-centred congregations. Folks in our fellowship come from a variety of church backgrounds, or none, and we do our best to welcome newcomers of all ages and stages of life.”

Trinity Church Aberdeen

For more information on the Trinity Church please visit their Website.

Trinity Church, Aberdeen, Scotland
Trinity Church, Aberdeen, Scotland
Oor Wullies, Big Bucket Trail, Aberdeen, Scotland
Arts Centre & Theatre, Aberdeen, Scotland

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Aberdeen #4

Day 5: 15 August 2019 – Exploring Aberdeen

Edward VII 1841-1910

The eldest son of Prince Albert and Queen Victoria, Albert Edward VII was born on 9 November 1841. Known as “Bertie” within the family, he was subjected to a strict regimen to prepare him for the throne. As was customary for British Royalty, Prince Edward attended Oxford and Cambridge universities. He soon after declared his desire to pursue a career in the military. His mother vetoed that idea, hoping to keep him safe for the throne. During his short time in the army, he rose to the level of lieutenant colonel through honorary promotions.

Edward VII became king upon the death of his mother, Queen Victoria, in 1901. A popular member of social and sporting circles, Edward VII strengthened England’s ties with the rest of Europe, his relationship with Germany’s emperor — his nephew — was rocky. His reforms of the military and navy prepared them well for World War I.

By 1910, Edward VII’s years of smoking 12 cigars and more than 20 cigarettes a day brought on a severe case of bronchitis. During an official event in France, he momentarily lost consciousness, and he returned to London. Alexandra, his wife, returned from Greece on 5 May and the next day called her children and told them their father was gravely ill. On 10 May 1910, Edward suffered a series of heart attacks and died. His legacy is marked by criticism for his pursuit of self-indulgent pleasures. He also got praise for his affable personality and diplomatic skill. He was 69 years of age when he died.

In this life-size statue, he is wearing a robe in his role as a Royal Knight Companion of the Garter. He carries a gilded scepter plus an orb and cross, symbols of his authority. In the shield below his feet is the image of Saint Andrew, Scotland’s patron saint. The granite sculpture by James Philip is located at the edge of a public park called Union Terrace Gardens along Union Street.

Statue of Edward VII 1841-1910
Statue of Edward VII 1841-1910
Statue of Edward VII 1841-1910
Statue of Edward VII 1841-1910
Statue of Edward VII 1841-1910

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Aberdeen #3

Day 5: 15 August 2019 – Exploring Aberdeen

Sir William Wallace 1270- 1305

He was born in 1270, probably near Paisley, Renfrew, Scotland. He was a Scottish knight who became one of the main leaders during the First War of Scottish Independence.

Sir William Wallace is remembered for leading the Scottish resistance forces to free Scotland from English rule. Many of the stories about Wallace (which are not supported by documentary evidence) have been traced to a late 15th-century romance ascribed to Harry the Minstrel, or “Blind Harry.”

After his betrayal and capture, Wallace was taken to London, where he was tried. He was found guilty, hanged, disemboweled, beheaded, and quartered on 23rd August 1305.

Wallace’s death did not end Scotland’s Wars of Independence. Robert the Bruce continued the fight and achieved victory at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314.

The William Wallace Statue was erected 1888 in Aberdeen, Scotland, and depicts Sir William Wallace. Sculpted by William Grant Stevenson, the statue is positioned opposite His Majesty’s Theatre and across from Union Terrace Gardens.

William Wallace Statue, Aberdeen

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Aberdeen #2

Day 5: 15 August 2019 Exploring Aberdeen

His Majesty’s Theatre

It is the largest theatre in north-east Scotland, seating more than 1,400. The theatre is sited on Rosemount Viaduct, opposite the city’s Union Terrace Gardens. It was designed by Frank Matcham and opened in 1906.

The granite-clad theatre is the brainchild of Robert Arthur, of Glasgow, who started his group of theatres in the 1880s focusing on Her Majesty`s Theatre, Dundee, and others in England. His plans for Rosemount Viaduct were submitted to Aberdeen City Council in 1901, construction started in 1904, and completed in 1906.

Aberdeen City Council bought the theatre in 1975, the Council duly allocating £3.5 million to ensure the building’s survival. After 23 months of closure the theatre was reopened in 1982 by Prince Charles. After a National Lottery grant was awarded in 1999, the theatre was the subject of a refurbishment and extension. The refurbishment and new glass-fronted box office, café and restaurant was designed by esteemed Aberdeen City Council architect Trevor Smith. The auditorium and public areas were completely refurbished and new seats were installed. Backstage facilities were also upgraded. The refurbishment went on to win several awards.

His Majesty’s Theatre, Aberdeen, Scotland
His Majesty’s Theatre, Aberdeen, Scotland
His Majesty’s Theatre, Aberdeen, Scotland

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Reference:

His Majesty’s Theatre, Aberdeen Wikipedia

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Aberdeen #1

Day 5: 15 August 2019 Exploring Aberdeen

I know it is been a while since I posted about our Grand Tour of Scotland.

We spend the night at Skene House Rosemount. To be honest it was the most uncomfortable place we stayed on our entire tour. Every room in the hotel room was closed up by a heavy door. It was very hot and I felt claustrophobic and uncomfortable. I understand it is for fire safety, but believe me I did not feel safe. When we booked in nobody even told us to use our keycard to switch on the lights. So we stood in the dark trying to find a light switch. At all the other places we stayed they at least offered to help with our bags.

Dads Breakfast
My Breakfast

After Breakfast we loaded the car and we started exploring Aberdeen.

Bon Accord Free Church
Bon Accord Free Church
Aberdeen Market

We had our list of places we wanted to see but like always I had to take the wrong turn and ended up in a dead end. But like always getting lost worked out just great. We came across the most beautiful doors and windows.

Oor Wullies Big Bucket Trail
The Old Kings Highway
The Old Kings Highway

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did. Will share some more photos in my next post of Aberdeen.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

14 August 2019: Day 4 of our Grand Tour of Scotland: Part 7 – Dundee

Good day,

Today I am sharing some of the photo’s taken while exploring Dundee. We visited a few places of interest in Dundee and, I will break it up in different posts.

Alexandra Fountain
Alexandra Fountain
Seaplane Mercury Commemoration

The Tay Road Bridge is one of the longest road bridges in Europe. It was opened in 1966 when it replaced the old Tay Ferry. The 2,250m bridge carries the A92 road across the Firth of Tay from Newport-on-Tay in FIFE to Dundee in Scotland.

Tay Road Bridge
Tay Road Bridge
Tay Rail Bridge
View from Seaplane Mercury Commemoration

The V&A design museum in Dundee was built in the form of a ship and was design by Kengo Kuma. The V&A Dundee is the first design museum in Scotland and the first Victoria and Albert museum outside London.

V&A Design Museum
RRS Compass
RRS Discovery Compass

The Royal Research Ship (RRS), Discovery is moored at Discovery Point in Dundee. It was built in the city in 1900, RRS Discovery was the ship, which carried Captain Scott on his first expedition across the Antarctic. For more information on the RRS Discovery please visit their Website.

The RRS Discovery
RRS Discovery
RRS Discovery
Oor Wullie’s Big Bucket Trail Statue
OOR Wullie’s Big Bucket Trail Statue

Thank you very much for taking the time to have a look at my work.
Have a fabulous day. Till next time, please stay safe and healthy.

Coreen

14 August 2019: Day 4 of our Grand Tour of Scotland: Part 6 – Dairsie Area

Good day everyone.

Todays post is not going to be too long.

We left St Andrews and headed towards Dairsie. I wanted to go see Dairsie Old Parish Church and then Dairsie Castle.

Dairsie Old Parish Church
Dairsie Old Parish Church
Dairsie Old Parish Church

After walking around at the Old Parish Church I got into the car to get the directions to Dairsie Castle. Google maps said I have arrived at my destination. The castle was next to the church.

Dairsie Castle is a restored tower house that is situated next to the River Eden. They started building the first castle on the property around 1298. The Scottish parliament was held in the castle in early 1335. The castle was rebuilt in the 16th century by the Learmonth family.

In the 17th century it was sold to John Spottiswoode (1565–1639), Archbishop of St Andrews, who built Dairsie Old Church next to the castle in 1621.

For more information on Dairsie Castle please visit their website. Today it is being rented out as a Self Catering Castle.

I asked the grounds keeper if I could take some photos of the Castle and she said it was okay I could take a quick walk around the garden.

Dairsie Castle
Dairsie Castle
Dairsie Castle
Dairsie Castle
Dairsie Castle
Dairsie Castle
Dairsie Castle

Our next stop was Pittormie Fruit Farm. What I had in mind when I planned this stop was a big farm with fruit trees with a restaurant and farmstall. I drove past twice looking for the entrance to the farm. Dad spotted the sign when we drove past. It was a small little shop with handmade goodies. We bought some strawberries and something to drink and got back on the road to our next stop.

Pittormie Fruit Farm
Pittormie Fruit Farm
Pittormie Fruit Farm
House next to Pittormie Fruit Farm

Our next stop was Thai Teak. I scheduled this as a tea break. When we arrived we walked around a bit and then headed inside for a lovely cup of tea.

Thai Teak
Thai Teak
Thai Teak
Thai Teak
Thai Teak

Thank you for joining us on our Grand Tour of Scotland.

Our next stop is the beautiful Dundee.

Till next time, stay safe and healthy.

Coreen

“If you can dream it, you can do it.”

Walt Disney