Grand Tour Of Scotland: On Route to Scrabster

Good day friends,

Day 6: 16 August 2019:Rosskeen Free Church

On our way to Scrabster we passed Rosskeen Free Church and we decided to have our breakfast here. Gail packed a delicious breakfast on the go for us. I was busy getting out of the car whet it stated raining and I had to wait for a gap to take photos.

The surroundings was so beautiful and if we had the time I would have stayed longer and wondered around a bit more.

Our rental car from Arnold Clark
Ham and cheese sandwich…. Yummee
Beautiful Views from Rosskeen Free Church of the A9, Alness, Scotland
Beautiful Views from Rosskeen Free Church of the A9, Alness, Scotland
Beautiful Views from Rosskeen Free Church of the A9, Alness, Scotland
Beautiful Views from Rosskeen Free Church of the A9, Alness, Scotland

Rosskeen Free Church is a traditional stone-built church situated at the side of the A9, the main arterial road north.  It sits directly between Alness and Invergordon, on the right hand side as you go north.  Turn off the A9 and you’ll find the carpark on the other side of the church.  There has been a Free Church here since 1843 and the current building was opened in 1900.  

Rosskeen Free Church of the A9, Alness, Scotland
Rosskeen Free Church of the A9, Alness, Scotland
Rosskeen Free Church of the A9, Alness, Scotland
The Forge, A9, Alness, Scotland
The Forge, A9, Alness, Scotland

After we had breakfast, I took some photos while dad updated our notes. We then continued on our journey to Scrabster. Not long after breakfast dad said he was thirsty and feel like a hot cup of coffee . Luckily for us we saw the sign for the Tall Pines Restaurant. We stopped in the parking lot and headed inside. We ended up buying cookies, chocolates, fudge and coffee….

Lifestyle Express, Helmsdale, Scotland

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: On Route to Scrabster

Day 6: 16 August 2019: Dionard Guest House and Cromarty Bridge

Dionard Guest House

We had a lovely stay at Dionard Guest House.

Gail our hostess was very friendly and we felt very at home. I was running out of memory cards and she lend me her laptop so that I could transfer my photos from the cards to the external hard drive I took along.

We had to leave the guesthouse very early and could not sit down for breakfast. Gail packed us a breakfast to go. I will definitely go back to Dionard Guest house on my next visit.

Cromarty Bridge

The Cromarty Bridge is a road bridge over the Cromarty Firth. It first opened to traffic on 12 April 1979.

The bridge was built by Fairclough Civil Engineering Ltd, with other specialist contractors brought in to carry out surfacing, waterproofing and parapet construction work. It took two years to build by a 50-strong crew who worked in all seasons to get the job done.

The bridge is around a mile in length and the bridge deck sits on 67 piers with the foundation piles poured inside special coffer dams. Its design ensures that tidal flows in the Firth remain unchanged, protecting feeding grounds for migratory seabirds. 

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Inverness

Day 5: 15 August 2019: Exploring Inverness – Part 4

I am proud to say that I know the Gaelic for Inverness . Inbhir Nis. Who knows one of these days I will write a post or two in Gaelic.

Here are just some of the photos I took on our walk along River Ness.

River Ness, Inverness, Scotland
River Ness, Inverness, Scotland
River Ness, Inverness, Scotland
River Ness, Inverness, Scotland
Inverness Castle from River Ness, Inverness, Scotland
Views of Inverness Castle from River Ness, Inverness, Scotland
Inverness, Scotland
Inverness, Scotland
Inverness, Scotland
Inverness, Scotland
River Ness, Inverness, Scotland
River Ness, Inverness, Scotland
River Ness, Inverness, Scotland
River Ness, Inverness, Scotland
Go Nuts Art Trail, Inverness, Scotland
Go Nuts Art Trail, Inverness, Scotland
Views of Inverness Castle from River Ness, Inverness, Scotland
River Ness, Inverness, Scotland
Inverness Cathedral, Inverness, Scotland
Inverness Cathedral, Inverness, Scotland
Inverness Cathedral, Inverness, Scotland
River Ness, Inverness, Scotland
Inverness, Scotland
Inverness Cathedral, Inverness, Scotland
Oor Wullies Big Bucket trail, River Ness, Inverness, Scotland
River Ness, Inverness, Scotland
Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Go Nuts Art Trail, Inverness, Scotland
Go Nuts Art Trail, Inverness, Scotland
Town House, Inverness, Scotland
Town House, Inverness, Scotland
Town House, Inverness, Scotland
Town House, Inverness, Scotland
Town House, Inverness, Scotland
Town House, Inverness, Scotland
Town House, Inverness, Scotland
Foxes Pub, Inverness, Scotland
Foxes Pub, Inverness, Scotland
The Caledonian, Inverness, Scotland
House of Aran, Inverness, Scotland
House of Aran, Inverness, Scotland
Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Inverness, Scotland
Inverness, Scotland
Inverness, Scotland
Inverness, Scotland
Inverness, Scotland
Inverness, Scotland
Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Dad and Me, Inverness, Scotland

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Inverness

Day 5: 15 August 2019: Exploring Inverness – Part 3

I tried to find some information on Ladies Walk and the War Memorial, but there is not much.

Dad and I walked until we reached the War Memorial. We then crossed the bridge over the Ness River to continue our walk. It was a cool evening and we were starting to get hungry and decided to search for a restaurant or pup for dinner.

I took some photos along the way. If I had the time I would have stayed longer and walked further down the river, but it was getting late and we still had to walk back to the guesthouse after dinner.

Views along Ladies Walk, Inverness
Birdlife along Ladies Walk, Inverness ( Is it a pigeon or a seagull? I am not sure.)
Birdlife along Ladies Walk, Inverness
Birdlife along Ladies Walk, Inverness
Views along Ladies Walk, Inverness
Views along Ladies Walk, Inverness
Views along Ladies Walk, Inverness
Views along Ladies Walk, Inverness
Views along Ladies Walk, Inverness
Views along Ladies Walk, Inverness
Ladies Walk, Inverness
Sculpture in Cavell Gardens. Ladies Walk, Inverness

War Memorial, Ladies Walk, Inverness

18 foot high Celtic cross of red Corsehill sandstone carved with Celtic ornament and a sword; cross stands on tall
stepped base on which are carved the armorial bearings of the Burgh of Inverness. Wing walls paneled with tablets
bearing names of the dead enclose the cross on 3 sides and terminate in square-plan tapering piers.

War Memorial, Ladies Walk, Inverness
War Memorial, Ladies Walk, Inverness
War Memorial, Ladies Walk, Inverness
War Memorial, Ladies Walk, Inverness
War Memorial, Ladies Walk, Inverness
War Memorial, Ladies Walk, Inverness
War Memorial, Ladies Walk, Inverness
War Memorial, Ladies Walk, Inverness
War Memorial, Ladies Walk, Inverness
War Memorial, Ladies Walk, Inverness
War Memorial, Ladies Walk, Inverness
Oor Wullie’s Big Bucket Trail, Ladies Walk, Inverness
Oor Wullie’s Big Bucket Trail, Ladies Walk, Inverness

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Inverness

Day 5: 15 August 2019: Exploring Inverness – Part 2

Ness Bank Church of Scotland, Inverness

I got the following information from the church website.

“The Anti-Burger charge was first formed in Inverness in 1787, and, for a number of years, continued bravely under exceptional difficulties. For a short time the Congregation, as a body ceased to exist, but in 1817 the people again came together, meeting first in the open air, and then in one meeting house after another.


On March 23rd, 1821 the real history of the revived Congregation began, when in a thatched cottage in Fairfield Lane, Dr Scott was set apart as the first minister of the charge. In November of the same year, in Baron Taylor’s Lane, “the New Chapel of the United Associate Congregation in this place was opened” The members worshipped in this building till 1864 when they were able to build a new church in Union Street designed by Dr Alexander Ross.


During the ministries of Dr Scott, Dr Robson, and Mr Stewart, much good work was carried on; but gradually it was felt that larger accommodation was needed, not only for worship, but most of all for carrying on effective work among the young people of the Congregation and an excellent site in Ness Bank was obtained for £1700.


The present church was designed by William Mackintosh, an Inverness architect. It was built over a period of fifteen months in late 1900-1901 at a cost of £8,500 and was dedicated at a service on 22nd December 1901. It is now listed as a building of special architectural interest. It was planned with the church hall and other necessary accommodation under the church and so made the best use of the sloping site. The walls are of red sandstone built in early Gothic revival style and it is roofed with natural slate. At the northern end there is a gallery with access from the entrance vestibule and the seating inclusive of the gallery accommodates about 600 people.


The present minister, the Rev Fiona Smith LLB.BD, was ordained and inducted in January 2010
In the period 1787 to 2016 the Congregation has been served by 12 dedicated ministers”

Ness Bank, Church of Scotland, Inverness
Ness Bank, Church of Scotland, Inverness
Ness Bank, Church of Scotland, Inverness
Ness Bank, Church of Scotland, Inverness
Ness Bank, Church of Scotland, Inverness
Ness Bank, Church of Scotland, Inverness
Ness Bank, Church of Scotland, Inverness

Faith, Hope and Charity Statues

The history of the Three Virtues’ statues in Inverness began with the Young Men’s Christian Association. Beginning in London in 1844, the YMCA opened branches in towns and cities across the United Kingdom in the years that followed. A branch opened in Inverness in 1859, the ninth such branch in Scotland.

The association originally occupied a room at 3 High Street and also ran an evening school in a building in Davis Square. However, as the organisation grew and its activities became more popular, larger premises were required. A site was selected for a new building on the corner of High Street and Castle Street. A local architect, John Rhind (1836-1889) was chosen to design it and he produced a blueprint for an ornate building in the classical style with Roman composite columns. It was noted how well it complemented the Bank of Scotland which stood on the opposite side of the street. The foundation stone was laid by Lord Ardmillan on 22 April 1868.

The YMCA commissioned local sculptor Andrew Davidson (1841-1925), of Messrs D & A Davidson, to sculpt three figures from Greek Mythology – Faith, Hope and Charity  – to stand on top of the building. Each figure carries her own attribute: respectively a Bible, an anchor and a cornucopia.

The building was also adorned with busts of the heads of various religious leaders in spaces between the ground and first floor windows. One of these was John Wesley and this was removed to the Methodist Church in Union Street, and later to the new Methodist Church in Huntly Street.

The Association Buildings, as it was known, was later bought by William MacKay and became MacKay’s Tartan & Tweed Warehouse and, latterly, Grant’s Tartan & Tweed Warehouse. It was demolished in 1955 and the statues were removed to the Burgh Surveyor’s yard where they remained until 1961 when they were bought by Norris Wood, a stonemason and antique collector from Orkney. For many years they stood in the grounds of his home, Graemeshall House, near Holm, Orkney.

There they remained until the Council stepped in to purchase them in 2007.

The statues were restored and installed by Nicolas Boyes Stone Conservation Ltd of Edinburgh.

They were returned to the city following his death and Highland Council has had them installed on a plinth outside Ness Bank Church.

Faith, Hope and Charity Statue, Inverness, Scotland
Faith, Hope and Charity Statue, Inverness, Scotland
Faith, Hope and Charity Statue, Inverness, Scotland

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Inverness

Day 5: 15 August 2019: Exploring Inverness – Part 1

The Castle Tavern, Inverness, Scotland
The Castle Tavern, Inverness, Scotland

Flora MacDonald Statue

Flora MacDonald was born on the island of South Uist, in the Outer Hebrides, in 1722. After her father’s death, she was brought up under the care of the chief of her clan, the Macdonalds of Clanranald.

In 1746, 24-year-old Flora was living on the neighboring island of Benbecula. And it was here that she met Bonnie Prince Charlie – and stepped into the pages of history.

Charles Edward Stuart, better known in history as Bonnie Prince Charlie, was the leader of the Jacobite Rising in 1745. His goal was to reclaim the family title to the English, Scottish, French and Irish thrones. After barely escaping the Battle of Culloden, he was being tracked down by “The Butcher,” Prince William of Great Britain, when Flora MacDonald offered to help. She disguised him as her maid while transporting him in a boat to Skye.

This bronze statue of the Scottish heroine was created in 1896. It stands near the entrance of the Inverness Castle.

Flora MacDonald, Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Flora MacDonald, Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Flora MacDonald, Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Flora MacDonald, Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland

Inverness Castle

Inverness Castle is right in the heart of Inverness city overlooking the River Ness. Anyone visiting Inverness will see it dominating the River Ness which it has guarded for centuries.

Inverness Castle is largely a nineteenth century construction although fragments of the medieval fortification survive most notably the well and part of the bastion wall. The castle remains in use as a functioning court and therefore there is no public (tourist) access to the interior. Cromwell’s Fort has also been virtually obliterated although a clock tower survives as does a short stretch of the earth rampart.

Only two parts of the medieval castle survive. In between the County Hall and Sheriff’s Court is the castle well, restored in 1909. A short section of retaining wall is the only other part of the medieval structure intact today.

In front of the castle is a statue of Flora MacDonald and her dog. MacDonald is famous for her role in helping Bonnie Prince Charlie to escape capture by government forces, even though she herself was not a Jacobite supporter. The sculpture was created by an Inverness native, Andrew Davidson, and was erected in 1899.

Since the castle is still in use as a Sheriff’s Court and for government proposes only one tower is open to visitors. The tower, known as Inverness Castle Viewpoint, gives wonderful 360-degree views over Inverness and the River Ness. Even if you don’t ascend the tower you can still get outstanding views across the river to Inverness Cathedral on the far bank.

Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
View of Inverness Cathedral from Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Go Nuts Art Trail, Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Go Nuts Art Trail, Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Oor Wullie’s Big Bucket Trail, Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Views from Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Views from Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Views from Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Views from Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Views from Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Views from Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Views from Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Views from Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Views from Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
View of Inverness Cathedral from Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Views from Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
View of Inverness Cathedral from Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Cawdor Castle and Gardens

Day 5: 15 August 2019 – Cawdor Castle and Gardens

The Coffee House
Cawdor Castle Garden
Cement Chair Cawdor Castle Garden

Cawdor Castle with its iron yet gate, moat & drawbridge, turrets, turnpike stairs and vaulted 16th century kitchen is steeped in intrigue and history.

This ancient medieval tower house built for the 3rd Thane of Cawdor has been home to over 23 generations of the Cawdor family.

This fortification founded by William the Lion in 1179 was sited to command the ford over the river Nairn near the sea. That castle has since vanished without trace.

The family had another residence at Old Calder which, according to the Exchequer accounts, was last repaired in 1398. Again, not much remains of that building apart from faint crop-marks. A new, more efficient site was chosen. The imposing, rectangular tower-house consisted of four storeys and a garret with only one entrance to the outside world. Repaired and enlarged every century since, the Castle as you see it today is a family home like no other.

Legend

The legendary tale goes that the Thane of Cawdor, decided to build a new, stronger tower. Following the instructions received in a dream, he loaded a coffer of gold on to the back of a donkey and let it roam about the district for a day: wherever the animal lay down to rest in the evening, there his castle should be sited and it would prosper for evermore. The donkey lay down under a tree, which is now petrified at the base of the old tower at Cawdor.

Cawdor Castle
Cawdor Castle
Cawdor Castle
Cawdor Castle
Cawdor Castle
Cawdor Castle
Cawdor Castle
Cawdor Castle
Cawdor Castle
Cawdor Castle
Cawdor Castle

THE GARDENS

Cawdor Castle is set in wonderful gardens, divided into distinct and very different parts. What is fascinating is that each of the three distinct gardens has its own unique history. in addition, there is a large area of woodland directly behind the castle, known as the Big Wood. This woodland is all that remains of an ancient Caledonian pinewood and boasts some marvellous old trees, with nature trails winding through them.

FLOWER GARDEN

South of the castle is the Flower Garden, which was laid out around 1710 by Sir Archibald Campbell, brother of the then Thane of Cawdor. Though his brother held the title, Sir Archibald actually managed the Campbell estates across Scotland. He had studied in France and was influenced by the gardens he saw there to create the formal layout of the gardens at Cawdor.

Though much has changed since Sir Archibald’s time, the clipped yew hedges have survived as have several of the fruit trees he planted. The 18th-century design was enclosed by lavender borders in 1850, designed by Lady Cawdor. She also added the long herbaceous borders which ensure colour well into the autumn.

Laburnum arches surround the maze on three sides, creating a cascade of colour through the height of summer. Other sections of the garden include a Knot Garden planted with aromatic herbs, and a hidden ‘Paradise Garden’ protected by high yew hedges.

The Orchid Tree Bird Feeder, Cawdor Castle
Cawdor Castle Garden
The Orchid Tree Bird Feeder, Cawdor Castle
The Orchid Tree Bird Feeder, Cawdor Castle
The Orchid Tree Bird Feeder, Cawdor Castle
Cawdor Castle Garden
Cawdor Castle Garden
Cawdor Castle Garden
Cawdor Castle Gardens

WALLED GARDEN

This is the oldest garden at Cawdor and may date to the 16th century and perhaps earlier. There may have been an orchard here originally but by the late 17th century it had been planted with a profusion of exotic plants. The section nearest the castle has been developed as a hedge maze inspired by the Minotaur’s Labyrinth at Knossos in Crete. At the centre of the maze is a modern sculpture depicting the Minotaur.

Cawdor Castle
Tiger lily, Cawdor Castle
Tiger lily, Cawdor Castle
Cawdor Castle
Spring Snowflake, Cawdor Castle
Cawdor Castle
Tansy, Cawdor Castle
Thistle, Cawdor Castle
Thistle, Cawdor Flower
Geranium palustre
Lythrum salicaria, Purple loosestrife
Cawdor Castle
Cawdor Castle
Cawdor Castle
Cawdor Castle Flag
Cawdor Castle
Cawdor Castle
Aconitum napellus, Monk’s-hood, Aconite or Wolfsbane
Slate Garden, Cawdor Castle
Slate Garden, Cawdor Castle
Cawdor Castle

WILD GARDEN

Between the castle and Cawdor Burn is this semi-hidden garden, reached through a doorway in the Flower Garden wall. This delightful, informal area provides a stark contrast with the formality of the Walled Garden and Flower Garden. Here you will find profuse plantings of primulas, rhododendrons, and azaleas along with spring daffodils, bamboo clusters, and willow trees. Amongst these familiar species are rare plants native to Tibet. The Wild Garden leads into the Big Wood; 750 acres of mature trees dissected by meandering trails.

Cawdor Castle Garden
Cawdor Castle Garden
Cawdor Castle Garden
Cawdor Castle Garden
Cawdor Castle Garden
Carved in wooden log bench
Three Owls Carved in wooden log bench
Three Owls Carved in wooden log bench
Dog and heart Carved in wooden log bench
Dog and heart Carved in wooden log bench
Fox and Rabbit Carved in wooden log bench
Squirrels, Acorn Carved in wooden log bench
Owl Carved in wooden log bench
Porcupine Carved in wooden log bench
Porcupine Carved in wooden log bench
Porcupine Carved in wooden log bench
Dog and heart Carved in wooden log bench
Dog and heart Carved in wooden log bench
Fox Carved in wooden log bench
Fox Carved in wooden log bench
Rabbit Carved in wooden log bench

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: On Route to Castle Grant Gatehouse

Day 5: 15 August 2019 – Castle Grant Gatehouse and surroundings

On Route to Castle Grant Gatehouse, Grantown-on-Spey, Scotland
On Route to Castle Grant Gatehouse, Grantown-on-Spey, Scotland
On Route to Castle Grant Gatehouse, Grantown-on-Spey, Scotland
On Route to Castle Grant Gatehouse, Grantown-on-Spey, Scotland
On Route to Castle Grant Gatehouse, Grantown-on-Spey, Scotland
Sheep On Route to Castle Grant Gatehouse, Grantown-on-Spey, Scotland
Cattle On Route to Castle Grant Gatehouse, Grantown-on-Spey, Scotland
Cattle On Route to Castle Grant Gatehouse, Grantown-on-Spey, Scotland
Cattle On Route to Castle Grant Gatehouse, Grantown-on-Spey, Scotland
On Route to Castle Grant Gatehouse, Grantown-on-Spey, Scotland
On Route to Castle Grant Gatehouse, Grantown-on-Spey, Scotland
On Route to Castle Grant Gatehouse, Grantown-on-Spey, Scotland
On Route to Castle Grant Gatehouse, Grantown-on-Spey, Scotland
On Route to Castle Grant Gatehouse, Grantown-on-Spey, Scotland

Gatehouse of Castle Grant

Gatehouse of Castle Grant Located on the A939 between Grantown on Spey and Glaschoil is the gatehouse to Castle Grant and railway bridge of the old Highland Line.

Castle Grant Gatehouse, Grantown-on-Spey, Scotland
Castle Grant Gatehouse, Grantown-on-Spey, Scotland
Castle Grant Gatehouse, Grantown-on-Spey, Scotland
Castle Grant Gatehouse, Grantown-on-Spey, Scotland
Castle Grant Gatehouse, Grantown-on-Spey, Scotland

Castle Grant Platform was a private halt located at the over bridge and lodge at the gatehouse of Castle Grant (East Lodge – formerly known as North Lodge), in the Highland council area of Scotland. It was built in 1863-4, as part of the Inverness and Perth Junction Railway, with the lodge incorporating a railway bridge and the private station. It is next to the A939 road, to the north of Grantown-on-Spey.

Railway Bridge, Gatehouse of Castle Grant , Grantown-on-Spey, Scotland
Railway Bridge, Gatehouse of Castle Grant , Grantown-on-Spey, Scotland

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Tomintoul

Day 5: 15 August 2019 – Tomintoul

Tomintoul nestles at a height of 354m or 1,160ft on the northern slopes of the Cairngorm Mountains, and lays claim to the title of the highest village in the Highlands.

Tomintoul today is an attractive stone-built place very much as the Duke of Gordon would have envisaged it. The 40 foot wide main street is part of the original design, as is the grassy Square that forms the focus of the village. The drinking fountain in The Square is a later addition, being placed here in 1915.

The Highland Market, Tomintoul, Scotland
The Whisky Castle, Tomintoul, Scotland
Main Road, Tomintoul, Scotland
Main Road, Tomintoul, Scotland
Guinness sign, Tomintoul, Scotland
Tomintoul, Scotland
Main Road, Tomintoul, Scotland
Drinking Fountain, Tomintoul, Scotland
Drinking Fountain, Tomintoul, Scotland
Richmond Hotel, Tomintoul, Scotland
Hotel Square, Tomintoul, Scotland

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: The Watchers and Corgarff Castle

Well let’s continue our Grand Tour Of Scotland. Dad and I had a lovely lunch and hot tea and was ready to hit the road again. We came across this beautiful castle and lookout point. If we did not took the wrong turnoff we would have missed this. The Castle was closed but you could see enough from the lookout point with a big stone with holes in it, pointing in different directions. I enjoyed taking photos here especially through the holes. The landscapes was stunning.

Day 5: 15 August 2019 – Lookout Point, The Watchers near Corgarff Castle

Originally a noble residence, Corgarff became an army base for hunting down Jacobite sympathizers and, later, whisky smugglers.

Corgarff Castle looks quite ordinary from a distance, but a closer look reveals its unusual star-shaped perimeter wall, built when it was an army barracks.

Corgarff’s story is really two tales. The first takes us from the mid-1500s, when the tower was built, into the 1600s when it was abandoned. In this, the castle’s heyday, it was the impressive fortified home of the Forbeses of Corgarff.
In 1645, the Marquis of Montrose occupied the castle, which was recorded as derelict at the time. Corgarff was subsequently repaired, only for it to be set on fire in 1689 and 1690 by Jacobites. James VII’s supporters wanted to be sure that government forces couldn’t use the castle.

The second tale begins in the mid-1700s when the tower became a barracks and lasts until 1831 when the army abandoned it. For 95 years, the Redcoats patrolled Strathdon, hunting down Jacobite sympathizers. Latterly they helped the excisemen to stamp out the illegal production and smuggling of whisky.

Corgarff itself briefly housed a (legal) distillery in the 1820s. A small whisky still from the period is displayed in one of the two pavilions added to the castle by the army.

Corgarff Castle, Scotland
Corgarff Castle, Scotland
Corgarff Castle, Scotland
Corgarff Castle, Scotland
Corgarff Castle, Scotland
Corgarff Castle, Scotland
Corgarff Castle, Scotland

The innovative Watchers Art Installation which sits on the Lecht Road and offers spectacular views towards Corgarff Castle. This installation has a close connection with the castle and its existing standing stone, A Moment in Time, which was designed to frame telescopic views of the castle.

Corgarff Castle Trough the hole in the stone, Scotland
Corgarff Castle Trough the hole in the stone, Scotland
Corgarff Castle Trough the hole in the stone, Scotland
Corgarff Castle Trough the hole in the stone, Scotland
Corgarff Castle, Scotland
Corgarff Castle, Scotland

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen