Fauna and Flora Friday: 30 October 2020

Southern Masked-Weaver Ploceus velatus.

I got the following information in my Sasol Birds of Southern-Africa Book.

The bill is short, strong and conical. It is black in breeding males and pale pinkish-brown in non-breeding birds. The eye of the breeding male is red. The legs and feet are pinkish brown.

Southern Masked-Weaver Ploceus velatus.

The male Southern Masked Weaver in breeding plumage has a black facemask, which extends onto the throat and covers just the forehead and the sides of the face. The underparts and rest of the head are bright yellow, and the back is plain yellowish-green.

Southern Masked-Weaver Ploceus velatus.

The female has a brown or red-brown eye (may be red in some breeding birds) and is dull greenish-yellow, streaked darker on the upper back. The throat is yellowish, fading to dirty white on the belly.

They are common in gardens, parks and around farmsteads. It is usually seen singly or in small groups. It may also form larger flocks, and is often seen in mixed bird parties, and flocking together with other seedeaters.

Southern Masked-Weaver Ploceus velatus.

They eat insects, seeds, parts of flowers; nectar.

Southern Masked-Weaver Ploceus velatus.

It nests mainly from September to January. Males are polygynous (have more than one partner) and usually nest alone, building a succession of nests (about 25 nests each season), although several males may nest alongside in one colony. Nests are usually situated in trees, and often around homesteads, or over water. The nests are typical weaver nests – made of tightly woven strips of reed, palm or grass. The nests have a neat finish, and once selected by the female she will add a lining of soft grass and feathers

Southern Masked-Weaver Ploceus velatus.
Southern Masked-Weaver Ploceus velatus.
Southern Masked-Weaver Ploceus velatus.
Southern Masked-Weaver Ploceus velatus.
Southern Masked-Weaver Ploceus velatus.

This poor guy has been building his nest since August 2020. Every time he is finished, and it is time for the female comes to inspect she, ripped the nest into pieces. Mother nature is also against this poor guy. After a windy day, the nest lies in shreds all over the grass. But he does not give up.

Southern Masked-Weaver Ploceus velatus.
Southern Masked-Weaver Ploceus velatus.
Southern Masked-Weaver Ploceus velatus.
Southern Masked-Weaver Ploceus velatus.

Thank you very much for taking the time to read my post. I hope you also learned something new today.

Have a fabulous day. Till next time, please stay safe and healthy.

Coreen

What’s in My Garden? #46

Speckled Pigeon

Speckled Pigeon
Speckled Pigeon
Speckled Pigeon

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me in exploring our garden.

Till next time, please stay safe and healthy. Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

” A garden should be in a constant state of fluid change, expansion, experiment, adventure; above all, it should be an inquisitive, loving, but self-critical journey on the part of its owner.”   ~HE Bates

What’s in My Garden? #45

Cape Wagtail eating insects

Cape Wagtail
Cape Wagtail
Cape Wagtail

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me in exploring our garden.

Till next time, please stay safe and healthy. Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

” A garden should be in a constant state of fluid change, expansion, experiment, adventure; above all, it should be an inquisitive, loving, but self-critical journey on the part of its owner.”   ~HE Bates

Cee’s Flower Of The Day Challenge: 30 October 2020

Good morning,

Here is my contribution to Cee’s FOTD Challenge.

Moraea miniata Pronktulp

Moraea miniata Pronktulp

Thank you very much for taking the time to have a look at my work.

Stay safe and healthy. Till next time.

Have a Fabulous day.

Coreen

My Affirmation for Today: 30 October

“I give myself the care and attention that I deserve.”

Have a fantastic day.

Coreen

My Photo Someone’s Quote: 108/365

“What separates privilege from entitlement is gratitude.” ~Brené Brown

Have a Blessed day.

Coreen

What’s in My Garden? #44

Southern Masked-Weaver and Mr Bee

Mr Bee approaching the Southern Masked- Weaver busy building its nest.
Mr Bee getting very close
Southern Masked-Weaver spotted Mr Bee
The look of death….
It all happened so fast….

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me in exploring our garden.

Till next time, please stay safe and healthy. Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

” A garden should be in a constant state of fluid change, expansion, experiment, adventure; above all, it should be an inquisitive, loving, but self-critical journey on the part of its owner.”   ~HE Bates

What’s in My Garden? #43

Cape Wagtail Motacilla capensis

Cape Wagtail Motacilla capensis
Cape Wagtail Motacilla capensis
Cape Wagtail Motacilla capensis
Cape Wagtail Motacilla capensis
Cape Wagtail Motacilla capensis
Cape Wagtail Motacilla capensis
Cape Wagtail Motacilla capensis
Cape Wagtail Motacilla capensis
Cape Wagtail Motacilla capensis
Cape Wagtail Motacilla capensis

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me in exploring our garden.

Till next time, please stay safe and healthy. Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

” A garden should be in a constant state of fluid change, expansion, experiment, adventure; above all, it should be an inquisitive, loving, but self-critical journey on the part of its owner.”   ~HE Bates

Cee’s Flower Of The Day Challenge: 29 October 2020

Good day,

Here is my contribution to Cee’s FOTD Challenge

Limonium sinuatum Plumbaginaceae Statice

Limonium sinuatum Plumbaginaceae Statice

Thank you very much for taking the time to have a look at my work.

Stay safe and healthy. Till next time.

Have a Fabulous day.

Coreen

Throwback Thursday: 29 October 2020

Good morning,

Today we go back to 9 September 2013 and continue on our Tour de Sanparks. We are revisiting Kamieskroon, a small town lying in the foothills of the Kamiesberge. It is more or less in the center of the Namaqualand and roughly 70 km from Springbok. 20 km from Kamieskroon lies the beautiful Namaqua National Park.

Welcome to Kamieskroon

Kamieskroon was founded in 1924 when the Dutch Reformed Church bought the land to relocate from Bowesdorp. Due to a shortage of water and not enough land for the town to grow. Kamieskroon lies at the foot of the “Kroon” (Crown), a small koppie that resembles the crown of a king and is near Sneeukop, the second highest peak in Namaqualand. Also located close to Kamieskroon is Boesmankop, a mountain that resembles a Boesman (Bushman or San) lying on his back. Between 1969 and 2003, it was a military base housing two Armored Squadrons equipped with Ratel-90 and four Companies of SA 9th Light Infantry Regiment.

I love capturing beautiful churches in our country. They don’t build them with character anymore.

Dutch Reformed Church
Churchbell

We visited the Kliphuis kombuis, a restaurant/ farmstall, for something to eat and drink before we head to Namaqua National park. Everywhere you looked, there were some upcycled things to see. I loved those gigantic dolls.

Kliphuis Kombuis from the Dutch Reformed Church
Kliphuis Kombuis Entrance
Pink Bicycle as decor
Don’t let yesterday use up today…
Kliphuis Kombuis
Entrance of Kliphuis kombuis
Jimmy
Dutch Reformed Church from the gate of Kliphuis Kombuis Restaurant
Mr Scarecrow
Kamieskroon
His and hers outside bathrooms

That’s it for now, friends. Thank you very much for traveling back in time with me.

Have a fabulous day. 

Keep safe and healthy.

Coreen