Wordless Wednesday: 11 November 2020

Thank you very much for taking the time to have a look at my work.
Have a fabulous day. Till next time, please stay safe and healthy.

Coreen

“If you can dream it, you can do it.”

Walt Disney

Fauna and Flora Friday: 16 October 2020

Black Harrier Circus maurus

The Black Harrier is a medium-sized African Harrier whose range extends from South Africa to Botswana and Namibia. It has a wingspan of 105–115 cm (41–45 in) and a body length of 44–50 cm (17–20 in). When perched, this bird appears all black. In-flight, a white rump and flight feathers become visible. Its morphology is comparable to that of other harriers, with a slim body, narrow wings, and a long tail. Male and female plumages are similar. Juveniles have buff underparts and heavily spotted breasts.

The Black Harrier feed mostly on small rodents and birds and will occasionally take reptiles, catching them while flying low over its hunting grounds.

In South Africa, the distribution of the black harrier is distinctly polarized in both the Western and Southern coastal plains. Nests are concentrated either along the coastal strip or inland in a more montane habitat. Nests are generally absent from transformed and cultivated lands.

Black harriers are migratory birds and, their annual movements cover the southern half of the land surface of South Africa (including Lesotho). The majority of these birds undertake an unusual west-east migration. Pair members do not travel together and, they don’t use the same non-breeding areas either. It has been suggested that black harriers migrate to deal with declines in food availability.

Unusually, Black Harriers travel almost twice as fast during their summer post-breeding migration as they during their winter/spring pre-breeding migration. In many other species, this is often reported the other way round. One reasoning for this is that it is part of their pre-breeding behavior and that the extra time is used to find the best breeding areas.

Home ranges during the breeding seasons and non-breeding seasons are of similar sizes, suggesting similar levels of food availability. Black Harriers return to breeding areas they have used previously and, they return to their birthplace to breed.

Black Harrier Circus maurus
Black Harrier Circus maurus
Black Harrier Circus maurus
Black Harrier Circus maurus
Black Harrier Circus maurus
Black Harrier Circus maurus
Black Harrier Circus maurus
Black Harrier Circus maurus
Black Harrier Circus maurus
Black Harrier Circus maurus
Black Harrier Circus maurus
Black Harrier Circus maurus

Thank you very much for taking the time to have a look at my work.
Have a fabulous day. Till next time, please stay safe and healthy.

Coreen

What’s in my Garden? #16

House Sparrow Passer domesticus

House Sparrow

Thank you very much for taking the time to have a look at my work.
Have a fabulous day. Till next time, please stay safe and healthy.

Coreen

“If you can dream it, you can do it.”

~Walt Disney

Tuesday Beach Vibes: 13 October 2020

Kelp Gull at Melkbosstrand Beach

Thank you for taking the time to have a look at my work.
Till next time, stay safe and healthy.

Coreen

“If you can dream it, you can do it.”

Walt Disney

Fauna and Flora Friday: 9 October 2020

Sunflax Heliophila coronopifolia

Annual herb with stiffly erect stems to 60cm, roughly hairy towards the base, with thread-like or variously lobed leaves and blue flowers with a white or greenish centre. They close at night and in cool weather. Widespread on sandy flats and slopes. They often form massed displays in Namaqualand and the southwestern Cape.

I took these photos of the Sunflax flowers in the West Coast National Park.

Sunflax Heliophila coronopifolia
Sunflax Heliophila coronopifolia
Sunflax Heliophila coronopifolia
Sunflax Heliophila coronopifolia
Sunflax Heliophila coronopifolia
Sunflax Heliophila coronopifolia
Sunflax Heliophila coronopifolia
Sunflax Heliophila coronopifolia

Thank you very much for taking the time to have a look at my work.
Have a fabulous day. Till next time, please stay safe and healthy.

Coreen

PLEASE VOTE FOR MY PHOTO

Good day everyone,

Hope you are all still doing well. I have a huge favor to ask. If you are registered on Agora please go and vote for my photo.

This photo brings back so many good memories of travels with my late Mother.

A bit about this photo. I took in in July 2015 while my parents, the boys and I were on holiday in Pilanesberg National Park. This particular day I stopped at a water hole capturing Elephants drinking water. Then all of a sudden Mom started screaming I must move the car the Elephants are going to trample us. The kids thought it was a joke and could not stop laughing at their Grand Mother. I turned hanged out of the car and captured the Elephants while they approached the car.

Last Friday I got an email from Agora saying that this photo was selected for the top 50 of the Best Of The Week 10 competition.

If you are not registered on Agora and are a keen photographer feel free to register and vote. It’s free and you don’t have to participate in the competitions if you don’t want to. This site is not just for professionals and everybody can display their photos it must however abide to their rules.

PLEASE VOTE FOR MY PHOTO!

https://bit.ly/3gXCtvQ

Wordless Wednesday: 22 July 2020

Silent Sunday

13 August 2019: Day 3 of our Grand Tour of Scotland : Part 6

Good day everyone,

Oh my word this morning I am freezing. Hope you are all still healthy and staying safe.

Okay let’s continue our Grand Tour of Scotland.

Our next stop was Letham Glen. It was not even on my places of interest. In 2010 dad had his colon removed due to cancer. So if dad has to go there are not much time you must get him to a bathroom as soon as possible. This was also a reason why all our stops are so close together just in case.

I wondered around and took a few photo’s while waiting for dad.

Letham Glen Sunken Garden
Letham Glen Sunken Garden
Letham Glen Sunken Garden
Letham Glen Sunken Garden

The Sunken Garden at Letham Glen was the towns former swimmingpool in the 1930’s. They have turned it into a beautiful garden. I was impressed.

Our next stop was the standing stones of Lundin. But oh my hat did we struggle to get to it. First of all the GPS says your destination is on your left side, you have reached your destination. When we look around all we see is houses on the left and a golf club on the right hand side.

We drove past our destination at least 4 times when I told my dad that’s it I am not going to search anymore… Then I spotted it through one of the houses gates opening up on the golf course. Okay now we know where it is. Now how to get to it. So we followed a dirt road and there it was. But I had to go through someones backyard to get to the golf course. The groundskeeper told me the man get’s very difficult when he spots tourists in his backyard. But that’s the only way to get there….

I did not come this far just to give up. So dad waited in the car while I invaded the poor man’s privacy. Luckily he was not there so I climbed over the wall onto the golf course, took a few photo’s and climbed back again.

I got to the car and just as I pulled away the owner arrived…. That’s what I call timing…..

Standing Stones of Lundin
Standing Stones of Lundin
Standing Stones of Lundin

“On the second hole of the Lundin Links Ladies Golf Course (which incidentally is the oldest women’s golf course in the world), stands a trio of prehistoric stones, looking wonderfully out of place against the manicured landscape.

The huge megaliths stand between 14 to 17 feet tall. Crookedly shaped and made of sandstone, the pillars are believed to date back to the Bronze age, around the 2nd millennium BCE. Legend holds that the site was used by the Druids for ancient rituals.

Druidic rituals or not, it is likely that the three standing stones are the remains of an ancient stone circle. There used to be at least four pillars, but one stone went missing in the 18th century.”

Borrowed from Atlas Obscura

That’s all for now friends. Thank you for stopping by. Hope you are still enjoying our Grand Tour of Scotland with us.

Till Next time. Stay safe.

Coreen

“If you can dream it, you can do it.”

Walt Disney

Flower of the day Challenge – 22 June 2020

My flower of the day is Garden Nasturtium of as we know it Kappertjies. Today my mother would have been 74 years old. Since I can remember she loved these beautiful flowers.

Our garden by the pool was full of them and in different colors. When Mom and dad moved here the first flower she planted was Nasturtiums….