Durbanville Nature Reserve – Wand Watsonia – 4

Description:

Watsonia laccata is a dwarf perennial.

Cormous geophyte up to 40cm. Leaves glossy, sword-shaped with lightly thickened margins, mostly 6-15mm wide and about half as long as the flowering stem. Flowers in a short spike, pink to purple or orange; perianth tube 18-22mm long, flared above; stamens declinate (curved downward); bracts 10-20mm long, clasping the stem.

Capsules spindle-shaped, tapering to a narrow tip.

They flower from September to November

Habitat:

Seasonally wet. Stony lower sandstone slopes in the Southern Cape.

Wand Watsonia, Watsonia laccata, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/400 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Wild Flowers of South Africa by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Wand Watsonia – 3

Description:

Watsonia laccata is a dwarf perennial.

Cormous geophyte up to 40cm. Leaves glossy, sword-shaped with lightly thickened margins, mostly 6-15mm wide and about half as long as the flowering stem. Flowers in a short spike, pink to purple or orange; perianth tube 18-22mm long, flared above; stamens declinate (curved downward); bracts 10-20mm long, clasping the stem.

Capsules spindle-shaped, tapering to a narrow tip.

They flower from September to November

Habitat:

Seasonally wet. Stony lower sandstone slopes in the Southern Cape.

Wand Watsonia, Watsonia laccata, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/400 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Wild Flowers of South Africa by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Wand Watsonia – 2

Description:

Watsonia laccata is a dwarf perennial.

Cormous geophyte up to 40cm. Leaves glossy, sword-shaped with lightly thickened margins, mostly 6-15mm wide and about half as long as the flowering stem. Flowers in a short spike, pink to purple or orange; perianth tube 18-22mm long, flared above; stamens declinate (curved downward); bracts 10-20mm long, clasping the stem.

Capsules spindle-shaped, tapering to a narrow tip.

They flower from September to November

Habitat:

Seasonally wet. Stony lower sandstone slopes in the Southern Cape.

Wand Watsonia, Watsonia laccata, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/400 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Wild Flowers of South Africa by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Wand Watsonia – 1

Description:

Watsonia laccata is a dwarf perennial.

Cormous geophyte up to 40cm. Leaves glossy, sword-shaped with lightly thickened margins, mostly 6-15mm wide and about half as long as the flowering stem. Flowers in a short spike, pink to purple or orange; perianth tube 18-22mm long, flared above; stamens declinate (curved downward); bracts 10-20mm long, clasping the stem.

Capsules spindle-shaped, tapering to a narrow tip.

They flower from September to November

Habitat:

Seasonally wet. Stony lower sandstone slopes in the Southern Cape.

Wand Watsonia, Watsonia laccata, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/200 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 130 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Wild Flowers of South Africa by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

My Photo Someone’s Quote: 27 September 2022

GOOD MORNING

Wish It, Dream It, Do It: Turn the Life You’re Living into the Life You Want.

 

 “Kindness is one thing you can’t give away. It always comes back.” ~ George Skolsky

With all my heart Thank you for your continued support and for taking the time to look at my post.

May love and laughter brighten up your day and warm your heart. May peace and contentment bless your life with the joy that endures every season.

Have an awesome day

🤗Big Virtual hug🤗

Coreen

My Photo Someone’s Quote: 26 September 2022

GOOD MORNING

Wish It, Dream It, Do It: Turn the Life You’re Living into the Life You Want.

 

 “Every exit is an entry somewhere else.” ~ Tom Stoppard

With all my heart Thank you for your continued support and for taking the time to look at my post.

May love and laughter brighten up your day and warm your heart. May peace and contentment bless your life with the joy that endures every season.

Have an awesome day

🤗Big Virtual hug🤗

Coreen

My Photo Someone’s Quote: 25 September 2022

GOOD MORNING

Wish It, Dream It, Do It: Turn the Life You’re Living into the Life You Want.

 

 “Living is the art of getting used to what we didn’t expect.” ~ Eleanor C. Wood

With all my heart Thank you for your continued support and for taking the time to look at my post.

May love and laughter brighten up your day and warm your heart. May peace and contentment bless your life with the joy that endures every season.

Have an awesome day

🤗Big Virtual hug🤗

Coreen

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Slender Falsepea – 4

Polygala is also known as Milkwort, Butterfly Bush, September Bush, False Legume and Ertjiebos, Septemberbos in Afrikaans.

Description:

Polygala species vary in growth habit but they all have upright-growing stems and gracefully slender branches, densely covered with glossy, myrtle-like leaves, which can be green or slightly grey. Flowers come in shades of mauve or purple, but can also be pink, scarlet, or white; and although they can appear sporadically throughout the year, flowering peaks in late winter, spring, and early summer. Light brown fruits follow the flowers, and seedlings often germinate close to the parent plant.

Although their pea-like flowers resemble those of legumes, Polygalas are easily distinguished from legumes by the feathery tuft on their lower petals.

Habitat:

Members of this large family of plants occur in temperate and warm climates around the world; and include perennials, shrubs and trees. 

There are approximately 88 species of Polygala that occur in Southern Africa, and they are especially prolific in the South-western Cape; and common from near Clanwilliam in the Western Cape, to Kwazulu-Natal. However, Polygala can be found growing wild in both the summer and winter rainfall regions of South Africa, and in most provinces. These showy indigenous plants are widespread pioneer shrubs, which can commonly be found growing on dunes and rocky slopes, as well as in scrub and open grasslands; thriving in forests, and alongside streams.

Slender Falspea, Polygala garcinii, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/7.1
  • Exposure Time: 1/200 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: PlantZAfrica.com

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Slender Falsepea – 3

Polygala is also known as Milkwort, Butterfly Bush, September Bush, False Legume and Ertjiebos, Septemberbos in Afrikaans.

Description:

Polygala species vary in growth habit but they all have upright-growing stems and gracefully slender branches, densely covered with glossy, myrtle-like leaves, which can be green or slightly grey. Flowers come in shades of mauve or purple, but can also be pink, scarlet, or white; and although they can appear sporadically throughout the year, flowering peaks in late winter, spring, and early summer. Light brown fruits follow the flowers, and seedlings often germinate close to the parent plant.

Although their pea-like flowers resemble those of legumes, Polygalas are easily distinguished from legumes by the feathery tuft on their lower petals.

Habitat:

Members of this large family of plants occur in temperate and warm climates around the world; and include perennials, shrubs and trees. 

There are approximately 88 species of Polygala that occur in Southern Africa, and they are especially prolific in the South-western Cape; and common from near Clanwilliam in the Western Cape, to Kwazulu-Natal. However, Polygala can be found growing wild in both the summer and winter rainfall regions of South Africa, and in most provinces. These showy indigenous plants are widespread pioneer shrubs, which can commonly be found growing on dunes and rocky slopes, as well as in scrub and open grasslands; thriving in forests, and alongside streams.

Slender Falspea, Polygala garcinii, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/7.1
  • Exposure Time: 1/200 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: PlantZAfrica.com

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Slender Falsepea – 2

Polygala is also known as Milkwort, Butterfly Bush, September Bush, False Legume and Ertjiebos, Septemberbos in Afrikaans.

Description:

Polygala species vary in growth habit but they all have upright-growing stems and gracefully slender branches, densely covered with glossy, myrtle-like leaves, which can be green or slightly grey. Flowers come in shades of mauve or purple, but can also be pink, scarlet, or white; and although they can appear sporadically throughout the year, flowering peaks in late winter, spring, and early summer. Light brown fruits follow the flowers, and seedlings often germinate close to the parent plant.

Although their pea-like flowers resemble those of legumes, Polygalas are easily distinguished from legumes by the feathery tuft on their lower petals.

Habitat:

Members of this large family of plants occur in temperate and warm climates around the world; and include perennials, shrubs and trees. 

There are approximately 88 species of Polygala that occur in Southern Africa, and they are especially prolific in the South-western Cape; and common from near Clanwilliam in the Western Cape, to Kwazulu-Natal. However, Polygala can be found growing wild in both the summer and winter rainfall regions of South Africa, and in most provinces. These showy indigenous plants are widespread pioneer shrubs, which can commonly be found growing on dunes and rocky slopes, as well as in scrub and open grasslands; thriving in forests, and alongside streams.

Slender Falspea, Polygala garcinii, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/7.1
  • Exposure Time: 1/200 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: PlantZAfrica.com

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Slender Falsepea – 1

Polygala is also known as Milkwort, Butterfly Bush, September Bush, False Legume and Ertjiebos, Septemberbos in Afrikaans.

Description:

Polygala species vary in growth habit but they all have upright-growing stems and gracefully slender branches, densely covered with glossy, myrtle-like leaves, which can be green or slightly grey. Flowers come in shades of mauve or purple, but can also be pink, scarlet, or white; and although they can appear sporadically throughout the year, flowering peaks in late winter, spring, and early summer. Light brown fruits follow the flowers, and seedlings often germinate close to the parent plant.

Although their pea-like flowers resemble those of legumes, Polygalas are easily distinguished from legumes by the feathery tuft on their lower petals.

Habitat:

Members of this large family of plants occur in temperate and warm climates around the world; and include perennials, shrubs and trees. 

There are approximately 88 species of Polygala that occur in Southern Africa, and they are especially prolific in the South-western Cape; and common from near Clanwilliam in the Western Cape, to Kwazulu-Natal. However, Polygala can be found growing wild in both the summer and winter rainfall regions of South Africa, and in most provinces. These showy indigenous plants are widespread pioneer shrubs, which can commonly be found growing on dunes and rocky slopes, as well as in scrub and open grasslands; thriving in forests, and alongside streams.

Slender Falspea, Polygala garcinii, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/7.1
  • Exposure Time: 1/200 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: PlantZAfrica.com

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

My Photo Someone’s Quote: 24 September 2022

GOOD MORNING

Wish It, Dream It, Do It: Turn the Life You’re Living into the Life You Want.

 

“Don’t wait around for other people to be happy for you. Any happiness you get you’ve got to make yourself.” ~ Alice Walker

With all my heart Thank you for your continued support and for taking the time to look at my post.

May love and laughter brighten up your day and warm your heart. May peace and contentment bless your life with the joy that endures every season.

Have an awesome day

🤗Big Virtual hug🤗

Coreen

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Redstem Stork’s-bill – 2

Erodium cicutarium, also known as common stork’s-bill, Redstem filaree, Redstem stork’s bill or Pinweed, is an herbaceous annual – or in warm climates, biennial – member of the family Geraniaceae of flowering plants. It is native to Macaronesia, temperate Eurasia and north and northeast Africa, and was introduced to North America in the eighteenth century, where it has since become naturalized, particularly of the deserts and arid grasslands of the southwestern United States

Description:

It is a hairy, sticky annual, resembling herb Robert but lacking the unpleasant odor. The stems are reddish and bear bright pink flowers, which often have dark spots on the bases. The flowers are arranged in a loose cluster and have ten filaments – five of which are fertile – and five styles. The leaves are pinnate to pinnate-pinnatifid, with hairy stems. The long seed-pod, shaped like the bill of a stork, bursts open in a spiral when ripe, sending the seeds (which have long tails called awns) into the air.

Their flowering time is from May to October depending on your location. Here in South Africa, it flowers from June to October.

Habitat:

The plant is widespread across North America. It grows annually in the continent’s northern half. In the southern areas of North America, the plant tends to grow as a biennial with a more erect habit and with much larger leaves, flowers, and fruits. Common stork’s-bill can be found in bare, sandy, grassy places both inland and around the coasts. It is a food plant for the larvae of the brown argus butterfly.

The seeds of this annual are a species collected by various species of harvester ants.

You can find the Redstem Stork’s-bill in disturbed fields, gardens, yards, sandy areas, roadsides, harbors, and rubbish tips

Uses:

The young leaves are edible raw or cooked. The whole plant is reportedly edible with a flavor similar to sharp parsley if picked young. According to John Lovell’s Honey Plants of North America (1926), “the pink flowers are a valuable source of honey (nectar), and also furnish much pollen”. Among the Zuni people, a poultice of chewed root is applied to sores and rashes and an infusion of the root is taken for stomachache

This species is an important forage for domestic livestock, including cows, horses, and sheep. It is sometimes intentionally planted for this purpose.

Although intentionally planted in some areas, it is considered a noxious weed in others.

The flowers are a source of nectar for honey.

Redstem Stork’s-Bill, Erodium cicutarium, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/160 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: PlantZAfrica.com

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Redstem Stork’s-bill – 1

Erodium cicutarium, also known as common stork’s-bill, Redstem filaree, Redstem stork’s bill or Pinweed, is an herbaceous annual – or in warm climates, biennial – member of the family Geraniaceae of flowering plants. It is native to Macaronesia, temperate Eurasia and north and northeast Africa, and was introduced to North America in the eighteenth century, where it has since become naturalized, particularly of the deserts and arid grasslands of the southwestern United States

Description:

It is a hairy, sticky annual, resembling herb Robert but lacking the unpleasant odor. The stems are reddish and bear bright pink flowers, which often have dark spots on the bases. The flowers are arranged in a loose cluster and have ten filaments – five of which are fertile – and five styles. The leaves are pinnate to pinnate-pinnatifid, with hairy stems. The long seed-pod, shaped like the bill of a stork, bursts open in a spiral when ripe, sending the seeds (which have long tails called awns) into the air.

Their flowering time is from May to October depending on your location. Here in South Africa, it flowers from June to October.

Habitat:

The plant is widespread across North America. It grows annually in the continent’s northern half. In the southern areas of North America, the plant tends to grow as a biennial with a more erect habit and with much larger leaves, flowers, and fruits. Common stork’s-bill can be found in bare, sandy, grassy places both inland and around the coasts. It is a food plant for the larvae of the brown argus butterfly.

The seeds of this annual are a species collected by various species of harvester ants.

You can find the Redstem Stork’s-bill in disturbed fields, gardens, yards, sandy areas, roadsides, harbors, and rubbish tips

Uses:

The young leaves are edible raw or cooked. The whole plant is reportedly edible with a flavor similar to sharp parsley if picked young. According to John Lovell’s Honey Plants of North America (1926), “the pink flowers are a valuable source of honey (nectar), and also furnish much pollen”. Among the Zuni people, a poultice of chewed root is applied to sores and rashes and an infusion of the root is taken for stomachache

This species is an important forage for domestic livestock, including cows, horses, and sheep. It is sometimes intentionally planted for this purpose.

Although intentionally planted in some areas, it is considered a noxious weed in others.

The flowers are a source of nectar for honey.

Redstem Stork’s-Bill, Erodium cicutarium, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/160 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: PlantZAfrica.com

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Rain Daisy – 1

Dimorphotheca pluvialis, common names white African daisy, Cape marigold, weather prophet, Cape rain-daisy, ox-eye daisy, Cape daisy or rain daisy.

Description:

Dimorphotheca pluvialis is an annual herb up to 40 cm (16 in) tall. It has long, narrow leaves, sometimes entire but sometimes toothed or pinnately lobed. Ray flowers are white to yellowish, sometimes with blue or purple markings. Disc flowers are usually white to yellowish with purple tips.

Flowering in masses the glistening white daisies look like snow covering the ground of the large annual beds, small pockets along the footpaths and rockeries. For the best display it is important to visit the garden on a sunny day as these sun-loving daisies only open with the warmth of the sun from about 10 o’clock in the morning to 4 o’clock in the afternoon. As the sun moves across the sky their flowers follow, always facing the sun.

Dimorphotheca pluvialis forms a bushy plant that is covered with large white daisies all flowering at the same level. The flowering season is from July to October, depending on the rain. The narrow leaves are light green, about 7 cm long and have indented edges. They are numerous at the base of the stems, becoming fewer and smaller near the top.

Habitat:

Dimorphotheca pluvialis is endemic to Namibia, Namaqualand and the Western Cape, it occurs on sandy and clay flats and slopes from Gouritsmond to southern Namibia. During spring huge fields are covered with this bright white daisy, forming a dazzling mass.

In their natural habitat the flowers are pollinated by small horseflies that get covered with pollen as they fly from one daisy to the next in search of tiny amounts of nectar.

These annuals are adapted to germinate, grow, flower and set seed during the rainy winter and to survive the long dry summer as seed. The seeds are interesting in that two different forms are produced. The ones we usually sow is flat, papery and fly away easily in the wind. They are formed in the center of the flower by the disk florets. The outer ray florets form seeds which look like little thorns with a thick coat. Under favorable conditions the papery seed of the disk florets germinate in abundance, while the seeds of the ray florets have delayed germination to protect the species against unpredictable conditions in their arid environment.

Rain Daisy, Dimorphotheca pluvialis, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/7.1
  • Exposure Time: 1/200 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 190 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: PlantZAfrica.com

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Painted Lady Gladiolus – 13

Description:

Gladiolus carneus is a perennial, 25-60 cm, with narrowly sword-shaped leaves; bears funnel-shaped, pink or white flowers, often with dark pink markings on the lower tepals, with a tube 20-40 mm long that is about as long as the upper tepal.

Their flowering season is from October to December.

Habitat:

Gladiolus carneus are mainly found on sandstone, often in damp sites in the Southwestern and Southern Cape.

Painted Lady Gladiolus, Gladiolus carneus, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/7.1
  • Exposure Time: 1/200 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 190 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Fynbos by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Painted Lady Gladiolus – 12

Description:

Gladiolus carneus is a perennial, 25-60 cm, with narrowly sword-shaped leaves; bears funnel-shaped, pink or white flowers, often with dark pink markings on the lower tepals, with a tube 20-40 mm long that is about as long as the upper tepal.

Their flowering season is from October to December.

Habitat:

Gladiolus carneus are mainly found on sandstone, often in damp sites in the Southwestern and Southern Cape.

Painted Lady Gladiolus, Gladiolus carneus, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/7.1
  • Exposure Time: 1/200 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 70 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Fynbos by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Painted Lady Gladiolus – 11

Description:

Gladiolus carneus is a perennial, 25-60 cm, with narrowly sword-shaped leaves; bears funnel-shaped, pink or white flowers, often with dark pink markings on the lower tepals, with a tube 20-40 mm long that is about as long as the upper tepal.

Their flowering season is from October to December.

Habitat:

Gladiolus carneus are mainly found on sandstone, often in damp sites in the Southwestern and Southern Cape.

Painted Lady Gladiolus, Gladiolus carneus, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/7.1
  • Exposure Time: 1/200 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 100 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Fynbos by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Painted Lady Gladiolus – 10

Description:

Gladiolus carneus is a perennial, 25-60 cm, with narrowly sword-shaped leaves; bears funnel-shaped, pink or white flowers, often with dark pink markings on the lower tepals, with a tube 20-40 mm long that is about as long as the upper tepal.

Their flowering season is from October to December.

Habitat:

Gladiolus carneus are mainly found on sandstone, often in damp sites in the Southwestern and Southern Cape.

Painted Lady Gladiolus, Gladiolus carneus, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/7.1
  • Exposure Time: 1/200 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 100 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Fynbos by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Painted Lady Gladiolus – 9

Description:

Gladiolus carneus is a perennial, 25-60 cm, with narrowly sword-shaped leaves; bears funnel-shaped, pink or white flowers, often with dark pink markings on the lower tepals, with a tube 20-40 mm long that is about as long as the upper tepal.

Their flowering season is from October to December.

Habitat:

Gladiolus carneus are mainly found on sandstone, often in damp sites in the Southwestern and Southern Cape.

Painted Lady Gladiolus, Gladiolus carneus, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/7.1
  • Exposure Time: 1/200 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 35 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Fynbos by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Painted Lady Gladiolus – 8

Description:

Gladiolus carneus is a perennial, 25-60 cm, with narrowly sword-shaped leaves; bears funnel-shaped, pink or white flowers, often with dark pink markings on the lower tepals, with a tube 20-40 mm long that is about as long as the upper tepal.

Their flowering season is from October to December.

Habitat:

Gladiolus carneus are mainly found on sandstone, often in damp sites in the Southwestern and Southern Cape.

Painted Lady Gladiolus, Gladiolus carneus, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/7.1
  • Exposure Time: 1/500 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 100 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Fynbos by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Painted Lady Gladiolus – 7

Description:

Gladiolus carneus is a perennial, 25-60 cm, with narrowly sword-shaped leaves; bears funnel-shaped, pink or white flowers, often with dark pink markings on the lower tepals, with a tube 20-40 mm long that is about as long as the upper tepal.

Their flowering season is from October to December.

Habitat:

Gladiolus carneus are mainly found on sandstone, often in damp sites in the Southwestern and Southern Cape.

Painted Lady Gladiolus, Gladiolus carneus, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/7.1
  • Exposure Time: 1/500 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 100 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Fynbos by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Painted Lady Gladiolus – 6

Description:

Gladiolus carneus is a perennial, 25-60 cm, with narrowly sword-shaped leaves; bears funnel-shaped, pink or white flowers, often with dark pink markings on the lower tepals, with a tube 20-40 mm long that is about as long as the upper tepal.

Their flowering season is from October to December.

Habitat:

Gladiolus carneus are mainly found on sandstone, often in damp sites in the Southwestern and Southern Cape.

Painted Lady Gladiolus, Gladiolus carneus, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/320 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 100 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Fynbos by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Painted Lady Gladiolus – 5

Description:

Gladiolus carneus is a perennial, 25-60 cm, with narrowly sword-shaped leaves; bears funnel-shaped, pink or white flowers, often with dark pink markings on the lower tepals, with a tube 20-40 mm long that is about as long as the upper tepal.

Their flowering season is from October to December.

Habitat:

Gladiolus carneus are mainly found on sandstone, often in damp sites in the Southwestern and Southern Cape.

Painted Lady Gladiolus, Gladiolus carneus, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/320 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 100 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Fynbos by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Painted Lady Gladiolus – 4

Description:

Gladiolus carneus is a perennial, 25-60 cm, with narrowly sword-shaped leaves; bears funnel-shaped, pink or white flowers, often with dark pink markings on the lower tepals, with a tube 20-40 mm long that is about as long as the upper tepal.

Their flowering season is from October to December.

Habitat:

Gladiolus carneus are mainly found on sandstone, often in damp sites in the Southwestern and Southern Cape.

Painted Lady Gladiolus, Gladiolus carneus, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/320 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 100 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Fynbos by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Painted Lady Gladiolus – 3

Description:

Gladiolus carneus is a perennial, 25-60 cm, with narrowly sword-shaped leaves; bears funnel-shaped, pink or white flowers, often with dark pink markings on the lower tepals, with a tube 20-40 mm long that is about as long as the upper tepal.

Their flowering season is from October to December.

Habitat:

Gladiolus carneus are mainly found on sandstone, often in damp sites in the Southwestern and Southern Cape.

Painted Lady Gladiolus, Gladiolus carneus, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/320 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 190 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Fynbos by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Painted Lady Gladiolus – 2

Description:

Gladiolus carneus is a perennial, 25-60 cm, with narrowly sword-shaped leaves; bears funnel-shaped, pink or white flowers, often with dark pink markings on the lower tepals, with a tube 20-40 mm long that is about as long as the upper tepal.

Their flowering season is from October to December.

Habitat:

Gladiolus carneus are mainly found on sandstone, often in damp sites in the Southwestern and Southern Cape.

Painted Lady Gladiolus, Gladiolus carneus, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/320 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 190 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Fynbos by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Painted Lady Gladiolus – 1

Description:

Gladiolus carneus is a perennial, 25-60 cm, with narrowly sword-shaped leaves; bears funnel-shaped, pink or white flowers, often with dark pink markings on the lower tepals, with a tube 20-40 mm long that is about as long as the upper tepal.

Their flowering season is from October to December.

Habitat:

Gladiolus carneus are mainly found on sandstone, often in damp sites in the Southwestern and Southern Cape.

Painted Lady Gladiolus, Gladiolus carneus, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/320 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 70 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Fynbos by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

My Photo Someone’s Quote: 23 September 2022

GOOD MORNING

Wish It, Dream It, Do It: Turn the Life You’re Living into the Life You Want.

 

“Don’t spend any time whatsoever thinking about what might have been.” ~ Alex Trebek 

With all my heart Thank you for your continued support and for taking the time to look at my post.

May love and laughter brighten up your day and warm your heart. May peace and contentment bless your life with the joy that endures every season.

Have an awesome day

🤗Big Virtual hug🤗

Coreen

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Night scented Pelargonium – 3

Description:

The night-scented pelargonium is a geophyte, usually about 25 cm (9.8 in), exceptionally up to 50 cm (20 in) high, that loses all above ground parts when it enters dormancy during the dry, hot summer. It lacks spines. From the subterranean rootstock emerge tuberous roots. The stems are hard and woody at their base and succulent towards their tip, initially green but eventually brown, and rough due to the scars left by discarded stipules and petioles. It is up to 15 cm (5.9 in) long and 0.5–1 cm (0.20–0.39 in) thick. The leaves in the basal rosette look somewhat like those of a carrot and are at least twice as long as wide, 10–45 cm (3.9–17.7 in) long and 4–15 cm (1.6–5.9 in) wide, on a petiole of up to 12 cm (4.7 in) long. These leaves may be upright or lay down. They are herbaceous, variably covered in short glandular hairs between short, whitish hairs. The rosette leaves are pinnately divided, the segments themselves mostly further pinnately divided or incised in linear leaflets or lobes, up to four times in total. The highest order leaflets are usually about 1 mm wide, but up to 8 mm wide in less divided leaves. The base of the segments is wedge-shaped or narrow into a stalk while the tips are rounded or squared-off, the margins entire and rolled upwards. The stipules are heart-shaped or oval with pointy tips, 5–8 mm (0.20–0.31 in) long and 6–10 mm (0.24–0.39 in) wide, thin and pliable becoming dry, and initially densely pubescent on the underside.

The flowers are 6 to 15 together in an umbel-like cluster on top of a sturdy unbranched peduncle of 5–25 cm (2.0–9.8 in) long and maximally 2.5 mm (0.098 in) in diameter. The part of the stalk of the individual flowers that contains the hollow, spur-like hypanthium is 30–55 mm (1.2–2.2 in) long, much longer than the remainder of the pedicel at its base that is up to 4 mm (0.16 in) long. The pedicel is densely set with straight, perpendicular (or strigose) hairs and with glandular hairs. The five sepals are 5–7 mm (0.20–0.28 in) long and 1–3 mm (0.039–0.118 in) wide, narrowly oval in shape with pointy tips, the outside densely strigose and some glandular hairs, the inside hairless, the margins with a row of hairs (or ciliate), dull green to yellowish green in color and sometimes with russet colored and slightly transparent margins. The five petals are almost equal in size and spade-shape with rounded tips, 10–18 mm (0.39–0.71 in) long, pale yellow in color but often adorned with a vague or intense burgundy to purplish black blotch that may leave only the outer margin yellow. The posterior two petals are 4–8 mm (0.16–0.31 in) wide, strongly curved backwards at their base and somewhat curved forwards at their tip. The anterior three petals are 2.5–6.0 mm (0.098–0.236 in) wide and less markedly reflexed. Four long and three short filaments initially carry anthers (best determined in a bud), three filaments are sterile. The pollen is bright yellow in color. The pale green, pear-shaped ovary is 3.5–4.5 mm (0.14–0.18 in) long and about 2.0 mm (0.079 in) wide, densely covered in hairs pointing to the tip. It is topped by a 2.0–2.5 mm (0.079–0.098 in) long style, that branches into five, reddish, curved stigmas.

Fruit and mericarps, showing plumes that assist distribution by wind and the coiled axil that aids in hygroscopic drilling to plant the seed

Like in all Geraniaceae, the fruit is reminiscent of the head and bill of a stork. It is schizocarp and consists of five units or mericarps. At the base of each mericarp is the enclosed seed that is 7–10 mm (0.28–0.39 in) long in the night-scented pelargonium, and a tail of 35–45 mm (1.4–1.8 in) long. The mericarps of Pelargonium are light and carry feather-like hairs to act like parachutes when dry and enable distribution by the wind. The awns of the mericarps coil when drying and uncoil when getting moist. These motions screw the seeds into the ground and in crevices.

Habitat:

The night-scented pelargonium is common in parts of the Northern and Western Cape Provinces of South Africa, from the Cape Peninsula in the southwest to the Orange River in the north and Mossel Bay in the east. It can be found on coastal sands, but is also present on slopes up to an elevation of 1,800 m (5,900 ft). Across this entire region, most precipitation falls during the winter half year, but the annual rainfall varies over its distribution area from about 100 mm (3.9 in) to over 600 mm (24 in). It is most apparent in open areas, but as the fynbos develop, the plants get shaded by the surrounding shrubs and stop flowering. The large underground tuber, however, enables the plants to survive for many years and reappear after a fire has destroyed the above ground vegetation. The deep hypanthium and night scents are suggestive that the flowers are pollinated by night-active, long-tongued insects such as moths. In Pelargonium, the seed capsule splits open along its length when dry, so releasing the seeds. The seed is dispersed on the wind carried by its feathery plumes. Each seed has a section in its tail that is spiraled when dry and uncoils when moist. Once the seed settles on the soil, it drills into the soil as it coils and uncoils with varying moisture. The continued survival of the night-scented pelargonium is considered to be of least concern.

Night scented Pelargonium, Pelargonium triste, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/7.1
  • Exposure Time: 1/200 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 135 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Wikipedia

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Night scented Pelargonium – 2

Description:

The night-scented pelargonium is a geophyte, usually about 25 cm (9.8 in), exceptionally up to 50 cm (20 in) high, that loses all above ground parts when it enters dormancy during the dry, hot summer. It lacks spines. From the subterranean rootstock emerge tuberous roots. The stems are hard and woody at their base and succulent towards their tip, initially green but eventually brown, and rough due to the scars left by discarded stipules and petioles. It is up to 15 cm (5.9 in) long and 0.5–1 cm (0.20–0.39 in) thick. The leaves in the basal rosette look somewhat like those of a carrot and are at least twice as long as wide, 10–45 cm (3.9–17.7 in) long and 4–15 cm (1.6–5.9 in) wide, on a petiole of up to 12 cm (4.7 in) long. These leaves may be upright or lay down. They are herbaceous, variably covered in short glandular hairs between short, whitish hairs. The rosette leaves are pinnately divided, the segments themselves mostly further pinnately divided or incised in linear leaflets or lobes, up to four times in total. The highest order leaflets are usually about 1 mm wide, but up to 8 mm wide in less divided leaves. The base of the segments is wedge-shaped or narrow into a stalk while the tips are rounded or squared-off, the margins entire and rolled upwards. The stipules are heart-shaped or oval with pointy tips, 5–8 mm (0.20–0.31 in) long and 6–10 mm (0.24–0.39 in) wide, thin and pliable becoming dry, and initially densely pubescent on the underside.

The flowers are 6 to 15 together in an umbel-like cluster on top of a sturdy unbranched peduncle of 5–25 cm (2.0–9.8 in) long and maximally 2.5 mm (0.098 in) in diameter. The part of the stalk of the individual flowers that contains the hollow, spur-like hypanthium is 30–55 mm (1.2–2.2 in) long, much longer than the remainder of the pedicel at its base that is up to 4 mm (0.16 in) long. The pedicel is densely set with straight, perpendicular (or strigose) hairs and with glandular hairs. The five sepals are 5–7 mm (0.20–0.28 in) long and 1–3 mm (0.039–0.118 in) wide, narrowly oval in shape with pointy tips, the outside densely strigose and some glandular hairs, the inside hairless, the margins with a row of hairs (or ciliate), dull green to yellowish green in color and sometimes with russet colored and slightly transparent margins. The five petals are almost equal in size and spade-shape with rounded tips, 10–18 mm (0.39–0.71 in) long, pale yellow in color but often adorned with a vague or intense burgundy to purplish black blotch that may leave only the outer margin yellow. The posterior two petals are 4–8 mm (0.16–0.31 in) wide, strongly curved backwards at their base and somewhat curved forwards at their tip. The anterior three petals are 2.5–6.0 mm (0.098–0.236 in) wide and less markedly reflexed. Four long and three short filaments initially carry anthers (best determined in a bud), three filaments are sterile. The pollen is bright yellow in color. The pale green, pear-shaped ovary is 3.5–4.5 mm (0.14–0.18 in) long and about 2.0 mm (0.079 in) wide, densely covered in hairs pointing to the tip. It is topped by a 2.0–2.5 mm (0.079–0.098 in) long style, that branches into five, reddish, curved stigmas.

Fruit and mericarps, showing plumes that assist distribution by wind and the coiled axil that aids in hygroscopic drilling to plant the seed

Like in all Geraniaceae, the fruit is reminiscent of the head and bill of a stork. It is schizocarp and consists of five units or mericarps. At the base of each mericarp is the enclosed seed that is 7–10 mm (0.28–0.39 in) long in the night-scented pelargonium, and a tail of 35–45 mm (1.4–1.8 in) long. The mericarps of Pelargonium are light and carry feather-like hairs to act like parachutes when dry and enable distribution by the wind. The awns of the mericarps coil when drying and uncoil when getting moist. These motions screw the seeds into the ground and in crevices.

Habitat:

The night-scented pelargonium is common in parts of the Northern and Western Cape Provinces of South Africa, from the Cape Peninsula in the southwest to the Orange River in the north and Mossel Bay in the east. It can be found on coastal sands, but is also present on slopes up to an elevation of 1,800 m (5,900 ft). Across this entire region, most precipitation falls during the winter half year, but the annual rainfall varies over its distribution area from about 100 mm (3.9 in) to over 600 mm (24 in). It is most apparent in open areas, but as the fynbos develop, the plants get shaded by the surrounding shrubs and stop flowering. The large underground tuber, however, enables the plants to survive for many years and reappear after a fire has destroyed the above ground vegetation. The deep hypanthium and night scents are suggestive that the flowers are pollinated by night-active, long-tongued insects such as moths. In Pelargonium, the seed capsule splits open along its length when dry, so releasing the seeds. The seed is dispersed on the wind carried by its feathery plumes. Each seed has a section in its tail that is spiraled when dry and uncoils when moist. Once the seed settles on the soil, it drills into the soil as it coils and uncoils with varying moisture. The continued survival of the night-scented pelargonium is considered to be of least concern.

Night scented Pelargonium, Pelargonium triste, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/500 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Wikipedia

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Night scented Pelargonium – 1

Description:

The night-scented pelargonium is a geophyte, usually about 25 cm (9.8 in), exceptionally up to 50 cm (20 in) high, that loses all above ground parts when it enters dormancy during the dry, hot summer. It lacks spines. From the subterranean rootstock emerge tuberous roots. The stems are hard and woody at their base and succulent towards their tip, initially green but eventually brown, and rough due to the scars left by discarded stipules and petioles. It is up to 15 cm (5.9 in) long and 0.5–1 cm (0.20–0.39 in) thick. The leaves in the basal rosette look somewhat like those of a carrot and are at least twice as long as wide, 10–45 cm (3.9–17.7 in) long and 4–15 cm (1.6–5.9 in) wide, on a petiole of up to 12 cm (4.7 in) long. These leaves may be upright or lay down. They are herbaceous, variably covered in short glandular hairs between short, whitish hairs. The rosette leaves are pinnately divided, the segments themselves mostly further pinnately divided or incised in linear leaflets or lobes, up to four times in total. The highest order leaflets are usually about 1 mm wide, but up to 8 mm wide in less divided leaves. The base of the segments is wedge-shaped or narrow into a stalk while the tips are rounded or squared-off, the margins entire and rolled upwards. The stipules are heart-shaped or oval with pointy tips, 5–8 mm (0.20–0.31 in) long and 6–10 mm (0.24–0.39 in) wide, thin and pliable becoming dry, and initially densely pubescent on the underside.

The flowers are 6 to 15 together in an umbel-like cluster on top of a sturdy unbranched peduncle of 5–25 cm (2.0–9.8 in) long and maximally 2.5 mm (0.098 in) in diameter. The part of the stalk of the individual flowers that contains the hollow, spur-like hypanthium is 30–55 mm (1.2–2.2 in) long, much longer than the remainder of the pedicel at its base that is up to 4 mm (0.16 in) long. The pedicel is densely set with straight, perpendicular (or strigose) hairs and with glandular hairs. The five sepals are 5–7 mm (0.20–0.28 in) long and 1–3 mm (0.039–0.118 in) wide, narrowly oval in shape with pointy tips, the outside densely strigose and some glandular hairs, the inside hairless, the margins with a row of hairs (or ciliate), dull green to yellowish green in color and sometimes with russet colored and slightly transparent margins. The five petals are almost equal in size and spade-shape with rounded tips, 10–18 mm (0.39–0.71 in) long, pale yellow in color but often adorned with a vague or intense burgundy to purplish black blotch that may leave only the outer margin yellow. The posterior two petals are 4–8 mm (0.16–0.31 in) wide, strongly curved backwards at their base and somewhat curved forwards at their tip. The anterior three petals are 2.5–6.0 mm (0.098–0.236 in) wide and less markedly reflexed. Four long and three short filaments initially carry anthers (best determined in a bud), three filaments are sterile. The pollen is bright yellow in color. The pale green, pear-shaped ovary is 3.5–4.5 mm (0.14–0.18 in) long and about 2.0 mm (0.079 in) wide, densely covered in hairs pointing to the tip. It is topped by a 2.0–2.5 mm (0.079–0.098 in) long style, that branches into five, reddish, curved stigmas.

Fruit and mericarps, showing plumes that assist distribution by wind and the coiled axil that aids in hygroscopic drilling to plant the seed

Like in all Geraniaceae, the fruit is reminiscent of the head and bill of a stork. It is schizocarp and consists of five units or mericarps. At the base of each mericarp is the enclosed seed that is 7–10 mm (0.28–0.39 in) long in the night-scented pelargonium, and a tail of 35–45 mm (1.4–1.8 in) long. The mericarps of Pelargonium are light and carry feather-like hairs to act like parachutes when dry and enable distribution by the wind. The awns of the mericarps coil when drying and uncoil when getting moist. These motions screw the seeds into the ground and in crevices.

Habitat:

The night-scented pelargonium is common in parts of the Northern and Western Cape Provinces of South Africa, from the Cape Peninsula in the southwest to the Orange River in the north and Mossel Bay in the east. It can be found on coastal sands, but is also present on slopes up to an elevation of 1,800 m (5,900 ft). Across this entire region, most precipitation falls during the winter half year, but the annual rainfall varies over its distribution area from about 100 mm (3.9 in) to over 600 mm (24 in). It is most apparent in open areas, but as the fynbos develop, the plants get shaded by the surrounding shrubs and stop flowering. The large underground tuber, however, enables the plants to survive for many years and reappear after a fire has destroyed the above ground vegetation. The deep hypantium and night scents are suggestive that the flowers are pollinated by night-active, long-tongued insects such as moths. In Pelargonium, the seed capsule splits open along its length when dry, so releasing the seeds. The seed is dispersed on the wind carried by its feathery plumes. Each seed has a section in its tail that is spiraled when dry and uncoils when moist. Once the seed settles on the soil, it drills into the soil as it coils and uncoils with varying moisture. The continued survival of the night-scented pelargonium is considered to be of least concern.

Night scented Pelargonium, Pelargonium triste, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/500 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Wikipedia

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Matrix Uintjie – 5

Description:

Moraea bellendenii is a Willowy-stemmed perennial, 50-100 cm, with a single, trailing bear; pale yellow flowers speckled in the center. The outer tepals are plus minus erect and cupped and the inner tepals are small and 3-lobed with a short, obliquely twisted central cusp; the flowers last several days.

Moraea bellendenii flowers during October and November in South Africa.

Habitat:

Moraea bellendenii grows in granitic, sandy or clay slopes in the Southwestern and Southern Cape.

Matrix Uintjie, Moraea bellendenii, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/400 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Fynbos by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Matrix Uintjie – 4

Description:

Moraea bellendenii is a Willowy-stemmed perennial, 50-100 cm, with a single, trailing bear; pale yellow flowers speckled in the center. The outer tepals are plus minus erect and cupped and the inner tepals are small and 3-lobed with a short, obliquely twisted central cusp; the flowers last several days.

Moraea bellendenii flowers during October and November in South Africa.

Habitat:

Moraea bellendenii grows in granitic, sandy or clay slopes in the Southwestern and Southern Cape.

Matrix Uintjie, Moraea bellendenii, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/640 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Fynbos by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Matrix Uintjie – 3

Description:

Moraea bellendenii is a Willowy-stemmed perennial, 50-100 cm, with a single, trailing bear; pale yellow flowers speckled in the center. The outer tepals are plus minus erect and cupped and the inner tepals are small and 3-lobed with a short, obliquely twisted central cusp; the flowers last several days.

Moraea bellendenii flowers during October and November in South Africa.

Habitat:

Moraea bellendenii grows in granitic, sandy or clay slopes in the Southwestern and Southern Cape.

Matrix Uintjie, Moraea bellendenii, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/640 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Fynbos by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Matrix Uintjie – 2

Description:

Moraea bellendenii is a Willowy-stemmed perennial, 50-100 cm, with a single, trailing bear; pale yellow flowers speckled in the center. The outer tepals are plus minus erect and cupped and the inner tepals are small and 3-lobed with a short, obliquely twisted central cusp; the flowers last several days.

Moraea bellendenii flowers during October and November in South Africa.

Habitat:

Moraea bellendenii grows in granitic, sandy or clay slopes in the Southwestern and Southern Cape.

Matrix Uintjie, Moraea bellendenii, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/400 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Fynbos by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Matrix Uintjie – 1

Description:

Moraea bellendenii is a Willowy-stemmed perennial, 50-100 cm, with a single, trailing bear; pale yellow flowers speckled in the center. The outer tepals are plus minus erect and cupped and the inner tepals are small and 3-lobed with a short, obliquely twisted central cusp; the flowers last several days.

Moraea bellendenii flowers during October and November in South Africa.

Habitat:

Moraea bellendenii grows in granitic, sandy or clay slopes in the Southwestern and Southern Cape.

Matrix Uintjie, Moraea bellendenii, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/400 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Fynbos by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Hedge Parsley – 5

Description:

Torilis arvensis is a species of flowering plant in the family Apiaceae known by the common names Hedge parsley tall sock-destroyer and common hedge parsley. It is an annual herb producing a slender, branching, rough-haired stem up to a meter in maximum height. The alternately arranged leaves are each divided into several pairs of lance-shaped leaflets up to 6 centimeters long each. The leaflet is divided or deeply cut into segments or teeth. The inflorescence is a wide-open compound umbel of flower clusters on long, slender rays. Each flower has five petals which are unequal in size and are white with a pinkish or reddish tinge. Each greenish or pinkish fruit is 3 to 5 millimeters long and is coated in straight or curving prickles.

Habitat:

Torilis arvensis grows in disturbed places such as road reserves; often slopes in South Africa. It is native to parts of Europe and it is known elsewhere, such as North America, as an introduced species and a common weed. It grows in many types of habitats, especially disturbed areas.

Hedge Parsley, Torilis arvensis, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/100 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Wikipedia

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Hedge Parsley – 4

Description:

Torilis arvensis is a species of flowering plant in the family Apiaceae known by the common names Hedge parsley tall sock-destroyer and common hedge parsley. It is an annual herb producing a slender, branching, rough-haired stem up to a meter in maximum height. The alternately arranged leaves are each divided into several pairs of lance-shaped leaflets up to 6 centimeters long each. The leaflet is divided or deeply cut into segments or teeth. The inflorescence is a wide-open compound umbel of flower clusters on long, slender rays. Each flower has five petals which are unequal in size and are white with a pinkish or reddish tinge. Each greenish or pinkish fruit is 3 to 5 millimeters long and is coated in straight or curving prickles.

Habitat:

Torilis arvensis grows in disturbed places such as road reserves; often slopes in South Africa. It is native to parts of Europe and it is known elsewhere, such as North America, as an introduced species and a common weed. It grows in many types of habitats, especially disturbed areas.

Hedge Parsley, Torilis arvensis, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/250 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Wikipedia

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Hedge Parsley – 3

Description:

Torilis arvensis is a species of flowering plant in the family Apiaceae known by the common names Hedge parsley tall sock-destroyer and common hedge parsley. It is an annual herb producing a slender, branching, rough-haired stem up to a meter in maximum height. The alternately arranged leaves are each divided into several pairs of lance-shaped leaflets up to 6 centimeters long each. The leaflet is divided or deeply cut into segments or teeth. The inflorescence is a wide-open compound umbel of flower clusters on long, slender rays. Each flower has five petals which are unequal in size and are white with a pinkish or reddish tinge. Each greenish or pinkish fruit is 3 to 5 millimeters long and is coated in straight or curving prickles.

Habitat:

Torilis arvensis grows in disturbed places such as road reserves; often slopes in South Africa. It is native to parts of Europe and it is known elsewhere, such as North America, as an introduced species and a common weed. It grows in many types of habitats, especially disturbed areas.

Hedge Parsley, Torilis arvensis, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/250 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Wikipedia

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Hedge Parsley – 2

Description:

Torilis arvensis is a species of flowering plant in the family Apiaceae known by the common names Hedge parsley tall sock-destroyer and common hedge parsley. It is an annual herb producing a slender, branching, rough-haired stem up to a meter in maximum height. The alternately arranged leaves are each divided into several pairs of lance-shaped leaflets up to 6 centimeters long each. The leaflet is divided or deeply cut into segments or teeth. The inflorescence is a wide-open compound umbel of flower clusters on long, slender rays. Each flower has five petals which are unequal in size and are white with a pinkish or reddish tinge. Each greenish or pinkish fruit is 3 to 5 millimeters long and is coated in straight or curving prickles.

Habitat:

Torilis arvensis grows in disturbed places such as road reserves; often slopes in South Africa. It is native to parts of Europe and it is known elsewhere, such as North America, as an introduced species and a common weed. It grows in many types of habitats, especially disturbed areas.

Hedge Parsley, Torilis arvensis, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/160 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Wikipedia

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Hedge Parsley – 1

Description:

Torilis arvensis is a species of flowering plant in the family Apiaceae known by the common names Hedge parsley tall sock-destroyer and common hedge parsley. It is an annual herb producing a slender, branching, rough-haired stem up to a meter in maximum height. The alternately arranged leaves are each divided into several pairs of lance-shaped leaflets up to 6 centimeters long each. The leaflet is divided or deeply cut into segments or teeth. The inflorescence is a wide-open compound umbel of flower clusters on long, slender rays. Each flower has five petals which are unequal in size and are white with a pinkish or reddish tinge. Each greenish or pinkish fruit is 3 to 5 millimeters long and is coated in straight or curving prickles.

Habitat:

Torilis arvensis grows in disturbed places such as road reserves; often slopes in South Africa. It is native to parts of Europe and it is known elsewhere, such as North America, as an introduced species and a common weed. It grows in many types of habitats, especially disturbed areas.

Hedge Parsley, Torilis arvensis, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/250 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Wikipedia

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

My Photo Someone’s Quote: 22 September 2022

GOOD MORNING

Wish It, Dream It, Do It: Turn the Life You’re Living into the Life You Want.

 

“Success is falling nine times and getting up ten.” ~ Jon Bon Jovi

With all my heart Thank you for your continued support and for taking the time to look at my post.

May love and laughter brighten up your day and warm your heart. May peace and contentment bless your life with the joy that endures every season.

Have an awesome day

🤗Big Virtual hug🤗

Coreen

My Photo Someone’s Quote: 21 September 2022

GOOD MORNING

Wish It, Dream It, Do It: Turn the Life You’re Living into the Life You Want.

 

 “Celebrate what you’ve accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.” ~ Mia Hamm

With all my heart Thank you for your continued support and for taking the time to look at my post.

May love and laughter brighten up your day and warm your heart. May peace and contentment bless your life with the joy that endures every season.

Have an awesome day

🤗Big Virtual hug🤗

Coreen

Hello World: 20 September 2022

Good day, friends,

I hope that you are all still in good health and that you are all living your best life.

So much has happened in the past two months.

My brother and his family moved into their new house. I am so happy for them and wish them many years of making happy memories in their forever home.

Poplap our parakeet passed away. He was stil talking, singing and dancing on the Sunday evening. When I got to him on Monday morning, he was lying legs in the air at the bottom of his cage. I have no idea what happened.

Poplap October 2014 – 22 August 2022

We had to euthanize Ogies yesterday morning. Every year she gets hay fever around August to the end of September. This year she had it bad. She just recovered and then since Friday I noticed that she did not move around much. She would go outside to soak in the sun, she stayed outside for a long time then came inside and looked for the sun on her chair in my room. Sunday, she started losing her balance and it looked like she had no control over her legs. She just falls over. By the evening we had to hold her while she was eating. Ogies is Armand’s baby. He had to make the decision to rather relief her from the discomfort she was having. I know it must have been the hardest decision he ever had to make in his life till now.

We had a wonderful 17 with Ogies and she gave us a lot of beautiful memories and tons of love. When we were sick, she would come to lie with us and help us to get better. I will never forget how she would ask me to go make a fire in the fireplace. She loved it. She will sit and stare at the dead fireplace and then I will hear her scratching against the grid. That was my q that she is cold and need the fire to keep her warm and comfortable.

Ogies June 2005 – 19 September 2022

Armand, got a 100% bursary to study Cyber Security. He is working very hard, but loadshedding is busy making things difficult.

In the meantime, I had Pneumonia again and was very depressed about it. I spoke to a friend and he told me to stop feeling sorry for myself. My dad would not be happy if he sees me so down and not capturing the world and living my dream. Dad was my biggest supporter and when he said that to me it hit me hard. I started thinking of all the times dad encouraged me to go out there and capture the beauty and the not so beautiful around me. I got my act together and gave myself a date to go out. Does not matter if it rains or sun is shining, I will be going out to take photos.

I started going out into the field again from 1 September 2022. I am busy working on my Parks and Reserves project. I try to go out at least two mornings a week.

The weeks that I do not go out I sit in the garden and take photos of the birds and my new plants. I will post some of my garden photos also in the near future….

Anouk White, Lavandula Stoechas, My Garden, Kraaifontein, Western Cape, South Africa

I also started a new project. This project takes a lot of time. I have to do research and learn more about the subject but I enjoy it. I have had this project in mind since I started photography in 2009. The boys bought me a wildcard so that I can enter all the SANPARKS and Cape Nature Reserves for free. I also signed up at The Botanical Society as a member, now I can enter all the SANBI Botanical Gardens for free. Kistenbosch is number one on my list and now I will be going there more often and I also paid a little extra so that I can take in a guest as well.

Foemina Pimpernel, Lysimachia foemina, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, Western Cape, South Africa

I might as well tell you all. I am busy working on a series of books. Not your normal flower identifying book. It is going to be very detailed and, in a language, the normal man on the street will understand. I have thousands of flower photos that I took since 2009 and now it is time to get them all identified. Well, those I have not yet done anyway.

I will be dedicating this series of books to my Father, Mother, my children and all the friends who encouraged me over the years. I also have a few of my followers here on WordPress that will be mentioned.

My photography student from years ago also moved back to Cape Town and she joins me on my expeditions when she is free.

I have also decided that from January 2023 I am going to start giving one on one workshops in photography. I had a few people in the past that I helped and then of course I had Lizette who came to me once a week for a photography class. She was my first proper student and I realized then that sitting in a room trying to teach photography does not work. I then moved our classes to the field and well it worked much better.

My leg is still not properly healed and I got a knock again when Willow and Oprah came charging down the passage and bumped me out of the way.

Thank you, thank you, thank you for all your support and for taking the time to look at my posts. I am truly grateful for every view, like, and comment I receive.

Wishing you all a fantastic day.

“If you can dream it, you can do it.” ~ Walt Disney

🤗Big Virtual Hug 🤗

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

My Photo Someone’s Quote: 20 September 2022

GOOD MORNING

Wish It, Dream It, Do It: Turn the Life You’re Living into the Life You Want.

 

“You can’t have everything. Where would you put it?”~ Steven Wright

With all my heart Thank you for your continued support and for taking the time to look at my post.

May love and laughter brighten up your day and warm your heart. May peace and contentment bless your life with the joy that endures every season.

Have an awesome day

🤗Big Virtual hug🤗

Coreen

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Hare Grass – 1

Description:

Tribolium uniolae is a sparsely tufted perennial grass with erect culms 100-600mm tall. Inflorescence, 10-70 mm long, is a spike with spikelet’s, 4-6mm long and arranged in two rows. It has relatively few leaves. The leaf sheath has long white hairs at the sheath mouth.

Tribolium uniolae flowers mainly from September to December.

Habitat:

Tribolium uniolae grows in disturbed places such as road reserves; often slopes in South Africa.

Hare Grass, Tribolium uniolae , Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/320 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Guide to Grasses of Southern Africa by Frits van Oudtshoorn

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Dainty Soldier-in-a-box – 6

Description:

Albuca cooperi is a bulbous perennial, between 35-60cm, with the outer bulb tunics decaying into fibers at the top, and 2 or 3 slender, channeled leaves that clasp the stem in the lower part and are warty towards the base. It bears a raceme of fragrant, nodding yellow flowers with broad green bands. 15-25mm long; the inner petals have a hanging flap at the tip and the outer stamens are sterile.

Albuca cooperi flowers mainly from September to November.

Habitat:

Albuca cooperi can be found in stony, mostly sandy slopes and flats, sometimes limestone, from Namaqualand to the Eastern Cape.

Dainty Soldier-in-a-box, Albuca cooperi, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/7.1
  • Exposure Time: 1/320 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Fynbos by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Dainty Soldier-in-a-box – 5

Description:

Albuca cooperi is a bulbous perennial, between 35-60cm, with the outer bulb tunics decaying into fibers at the top, and 2 or 3 slender, channeled leaves that clasp the stem in the lower part and are warty towards the base. It bears a raceme of fragrant, nodding yellow flowers with broad green bands. 15-25mm long; the inner petals have a hanging flap at the tip and the outer stamens are sterile.

Albuca cooperi flowers mainly from September to November.

Habitat:

Albuca cooperi can be found in stony, mostly sandy slopes and flats, sometimes limestone, from Namaqualand to the Eastern Cape.