Squared: 1 April 2021

Red-Knobbed Coot, Sonstraaldam

Thank you very much for taking the time to have a look at my work.

Stay safe and healthy. Till next time.

Have a Fabulous day.

Coreen

Sunday Portraits: 28 March 2021

Alpaca, Alpaca Loom, Paarl

With all my heart, thank you very much for taking the time to have a look at my Sunday Portraits.

Have a Blessed day.

Till next time, please stay safe and healthy.

Coreen

Just a Random Photo: 27 March 2021

Ceannabeinne, Scotland

Thank you for your continued support and taking the time to look at my post.

 Have a fantastic day. Stay safe. Till next time

Coreen

Fauna and Flora Friday: 26 March 2021

Cattle Egret, Bubulcus ibis

The Cattle Egret is a stocky heron with an 88–96 cm wingspan; it is 46–56 cm long and weighs 270–512 g. It has a relatively short, thick neck, a sturdy bill, and a hunched posture. The nonbreeding adult has mainly white plumage, a yellow bill, and greyish-yellow legs. During the breeding season, adults of the nominate western subspecies develop orange-buff plumes on the back, breast, and crown, bill, legs, and irises become bright red for a brief period before pairing. The sexes are similar, but the male is marginally larger and has slightly longer breeding plumes than the female; juvenile birds lack colored plumes and have a black bill. 

The adult cattle egret has few predators, but birds or mammals may raid its nests, and chicks may be lost to starvation, calcium deficiency, or disturbance from other large birds. This species maintains a special relationship with cattle, which extends to other large grazing mammals; wider human farming is believed to be a major cause of their suddenly expanded range. The cattle egret removes ticks and flies from cattle and consumes them. This benefits both species, but it has been implicated in the spread of tick-borne animal diseases. Their feeding habitats include seasonally inundated grasslands, pastures, farmlands, wetlands, and rice paddies. They often accompany cattle or other large mammals, catching insects and small vertebrate prey disturbed by these animals. Some populations are migratory and others show post-breeding dispersal.

It is a white bird adorned with buff plumes in the breeding season. It nests in colonies, usually near bodies of water and often with other wading birds. The nest is a platform of sticks in trees or shrubs. Cattle egrets exploit drier and open habitats more than other heron species.

“Study nature, love nature, stay close to nature. It will never fail you.” ~Frank Lloyd Write

Thank you very much for taking the time to read my post. I hope you also learned something new today.

Have a fabulous day. Till next time, please stay safe and healthy.

Coreen

Sunday Portraits: 14 March 2021

Alpaca, Alpaca Loom, Paarl

With all my heart, thank you very much for taking the time to have a look at my Sunday Portraits.

Have a Blessed day.

Till next time, please stay safe and healthy.

Coreen

Just a Random Photo: 12 March 2021

Black Alpaca at Alpaca Loom, Southern Paarl

Thank you for your continued support and taking the time to look at my post.

 Have a fantastic day. Stay safe. Till next time

Coreen

Throwback Thursday: 25 February 2021

Good day friends,

Today we are still in the Goegap Nature Reserve just outside of Springbok.

Bittergousblom, Arctotis fastuosa, Goegap Nature Reserve
Bittergousblom, Arctotis fastuosa, Goegap Nature Reserve
Dad help to keep flower steady so I can take a photo.
Goegap Nature Reserve
Oryx, Gemsbok, Goegap Nature Reserve
Oryx, Gemsbok, Goegap Nature Reserve
Sunflax, Sporrie, Goegap Nature Reserve
Zebra lying down. Oryx in the background, Goegap Nature Reserve
Zebras and a Oryx in the Goegap Nature Reserve
Zebras and a Oryx in the Goegap Nature Reserve

“It’s the little memories that will last a lifetime.”  ~Unknown

That’s it for now, friends. Thank you very much for traveling back in time with me.

Have a fabulous day. 

Keep safe and healthy.

Coreen

Fauna and Flora Friday: 19 February 2021

Egyptian Goose, Kolgans, Alopachen aegyptiaca

The Egyptian goose – also known as the Nil goose – is named after its origin, The Nile Valley in Africa. It is a large, very distinctive waterbird with conspicuous eye patches of dark chocolate-brown. The female resembles the male, though smaller, often with darker markings on her beak. The genders can also be told apart by their calls, as the male makes a hoarse hissing noise, while the female produces a harsh, trumpeting quack. Young Egyptian geese have a duller color and have a gray tinge on their forewings, and their crown and neck are darker, with yellowish legs and beak. They are approximately 63-73 cm, and their wings 34-41 cm.

Egyptian Goose, Kolgans, Alopachen aegyptiaca
Egyptian Goose Chick, Kolgans, Alopachen aegyptiaca
Egyptian Goose, Kolgans, Alopachen aegyptiaca

Egyptian geese are widespread throughout Africa except in deserts and dense forests.
Egyptian geese remain together in small flocks during the year, primarily for protection. During the breeding season, they pair up and stay with the group. They are mostly non-migratory and will generally move about only if the water in their area is in short supply. They are good swimmers but spent most of their time on land. They may wander away from the water searching for food, but at night always return. Both genders are aggressively territorial with their species during breeding and often pursue intruders in flight, attacking them in “dogfights” in the air.

Egyptian Goose, Kolgans, Alopachen aegyptiaca
Egyptian Goose, Kolgans, Alopachen aegyptiaca
Egyptian Goose, Kolgans, Alopachen aegyptiaca
Egyptian Goose, Kolgans, Alopachen aegyptiaca

They are primarily herbivores, feeding on grass, seeds, stems, leaves from various plants, grains, potatoes, and other types of vegetables.
They are monogamous, and a pair stays together for their whole life. Males are quite aggressive during mating. Each male performs an elaborate and noisy courtship display, producing loud honking noises to attract a female. These geese breed in spring or when the dry season ends. They nest on their own on the ground, sheltered by vegetation. Females lay 5 to 11 creamy-white eggs. Incubation is by the female only and lasts for around 28 to 30 days. Births are synchronized. The male and the female take care and feed the chicks. The chicks reach maturity when they are two years old.

Egyptian Goose Chick, Kolgans, Alopachen aegyptiaca
Egyptian Goose Chick, Kolgans, Alopachen aegyptiaca
Egyptian Goose Chick, Kolgans, Alopachen aegyptiaca
Egyptian Goose, Kolgans, Alopachen aegyptiaca
Egyptian Goose, Kolgans, Alopachen aegyptiaca
Egyptian Goose, Kolgans, Alopachen aegyptiaca

“Study nature, love nature, stay close to nature. It will never fail you.” ~Frank Lloyd Write

Thank you very much for taking the time to read my post. I hope you also learned something new today.

Have a fabulous day. Till next time, please stay safe and healthy.

Coreen

Squared: 3 February 2021

Springbok, Goegap Nature Reserve

Thank you very much for taking the time to have a look at my work.

Stay safe and healthy. Till next time.

Have a Fabulous day.

Coreen

Throwback Thursday: 21 January 2021

Good day everyone,

Today we are going back to 10 September 2013. Today we continue our second day of our Tour de Sanparks. Currently we are still in Goegap Nature Reserve. The Landscapes are spectacular and I am loving the wildlife.

Oryx, Gemsbok, Goegap Nature Reserve
Goegap Nature Reserve
Goegap Nature Reserve
Springbok, Goegap Nature Reserve
Goegap Nature Reserve
Goegap Nature Reserve
Goegap Nature Reserve
Oryx, Gemsbok, Goegap Nature Reserve
Springbok, Goegap Nature Reserve
Springbok, Goegap Nature Reserve

“It’s the little memories that will last a lifetime.”  ~Unknown

That’s it for now, friends. Thank you very much for traveling back in time with me.

Have a fabulous day. 

Keep safe and healthy.

Coreen