Throwback Thursday: 21 January 2021

Good day everyone,

Today we are going back to 10 September 2013. Today we continue our second day of our Tour de Sanparks. Currently we are still in Goegap Nature Reserve. The Landscapes are spectacular and I am loving the wildlife.

Oryx, Gemsbok, Goegap Nature Reserve
Goegap Nature Reserve
Goegap Nature Reserve
Springbok, Goegap Nature Reserve
Goegap Nature Reserve
Goegap Nature Reserve
Goegap Nature Reserve
Oryx, Gemsbok, Goegap Nature Reserve
Springbok, Goegap Nature Reserve
Springbok, Goegap Nature Reserve

“It’s the little memories that will last a lifetime.”  ~Unknown

That’s it for now, friends. Thank you very much for traveling back in time with me.

Have a fabulous day. 

Keep safe and healthy.

Coreen

Fauna and Flora Friday: 18 December 2020

Kelp GullLarus dominicanus

The kelp gull superficially resembles two gulls from further north in the Atlantic Ocean, the lesser black-backed gull, and the great black-backed gull, and is intermediate in size between these two species.

The adult kelp gull has black upperparts and wings. The head, underparts, tail, and the small “mirrors” at the wing tips are white. The bill is yellow with a red spot, and the legs are greenish-yellow (brighter and yellower when breeding, duller and greener when not breeding). Juveniles have dull legs, a black bill, a dark band in the tail, and an overall grey-brown plumage densely edged whitish, but they rapidly get a pale base to the bill and largely white head and underparts. They take three or four years to reach maturity

In South Africa, the kelp gull breeds in spring and early summer at Wolfgat Nature Reserve (Swartklip) and Rondevlei. They usually breed on off-shore islands and, nests are sometimes found on unfrequented cliffs. The nest is a scrape in the soil and lined with grass, feathers, or twigs. Two to three eggs varying in color from light green to turquoise or ochre with dark markings are laid.

Thank you very much for taking the time to read my post. I hope you also learned something new today.

Have a fabulous day. Till next time, please stay safe and healthy.

Coreen

Fauna and Flora Friday: 27 November 2020

Burchell’s Zebra, Equus quagga burchellii

Burchell’s Zebra,is a southern subspecies of the plains zebra. It is named after the British explorer and naturalist William John Burchell. Common names include the Bontequagga, Damaraland zebra, and Zululand zebra . Burchell’s zebra is the only subspecies of zebra which may be legally farmed for human consumption.

Like most plains zebras, Burchells live in small family groups. These can be either harem or bachelor groups, with harem groups consisting of one stallion and one to six mares and their most recent foals, and bachelor groups containing two to eight unattached stallions. The males in bachelor herds are often the younger or older stallions of the population, as they are most likely not experienced enough or strong enough to defend breeding rights to a group of females from challengers. These small groups often congregate together in larger herds around water and food sources, but still, maintain their identity as family units while in the population gatherings.

Formerly, the Burchell’s zebra range was centered north of the Vaal/Orange river system, extending northwest via southern Botswana to Etosha and the Kaokoveld, and southeast to Swaziland and KwaZulu-Natal. Now extinct in the middle portion, it survives at the northwestern and southeastern ends of the distribution.

Burchell’s zebra migrates the longest distance of any terrestrial animal in Africa, traveling 160 miles one way.

Burchell’s Zebra
Burchell’s Zebra
Burchell’s Zebra
Burchell’s Zebra
Burchell’s Zebra

Thank you very much for taking the time to read my post. I hope you also learned something new today.

Have a fabulous day. Till next time, please stay safe and healthy.

Coreen

Fauna and Flora Friday: 13 November 2020

Brants’s Whistling Rat, Parotomys brantsii

I got the following information in my Stuarts’ Field Guide to Mammals of Southern Africa. By Chris & Mathilde Stuart. The photos was taken in the Goegap Nature Reserve just outside of Springbok.

Brants’s Whistling Rats are stockily built, with tails shorter than the head-and-body length. Body colour is very variable and ranges from pale reddish-yellow with white underparts to a brownish or greyish yellow with grey underparts. The tail may be similar in colour to the upperparts or dark above and pale below.

Brants’s Whistling Rats can be observed in Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park and Goegap Nature Reserve, South Africa. They occur mainly in areas receiving less than 300mm of rain per annum.

Brants’s Whistling Rats commonly live in colonies, but they do not share burrows; may live in Solitary. Large Brant’s colonies stand out on the landscape because they are generally stripped of most vegetation. When alarmed they stand on their hind legs, in close proximity to the burrow.

Brants’s Whistling Rat, Parotomys brantsii
Brants’s Whistling Rat, Parotomys brantsii
Brants’s Whistling Rat, Parotomys brantsii
Brants’s Whistling Rat, Parotomys brantsii

They occasionally feed at the food site, but more commonly they bite off pieces of vegetation and carry them back to eat at the burrow entrance. When feeding, they stand on the hind legs, using the front feet to hold and manipulate the food.

Brants’s Whistling Rat, Parotomys brantsii
Brants’s Whistling Rat, Parotomys brantsii
Brants’s Whistling Rat, Parotomys brantsii
Brants’s Whistling Rat, Parotomys brantsii

They are vegetarian, eating the leaves of succulents and other green plant food, as well as seeds and flowers.

Brants’s Whistling Rat, Parotomys brantsii
Brants’s Whistling Rat, Parotomys brantsii

Brants’s Whistling Rats gives birth to 1-4 young, mainly during late summer and gestation last up to 38 days. Their lifespan in the wild is around 2 years.

Brants’s Whistling Rat, Parotomys brantsii

Thank you very much for taking the time to read my post. I hope you also learned something new today.

Have a fabulous day. Till next time, please stay safe and healthy.

Coreen

Monochrome Monday: 5 October 2020

Burchell’s Zebra drinking water

Captured this scene at a waterhole in the Pilanesberg National Park in July 2015.

Wordless Wednesday: 17 June 2020

Zebra’s Standing in long grass

Seaguls

I am not going to say much today. Here are some random photos of seagulls taken at Table View during our visit there in March 2019.

Thank you for taking the time to look at my work.

“If you can dream it you can do it.” Walt Disney

Dead trees with purpose…

There are just something about a tree dead or alive in the middle of a river or pond.

It looks beautiful even if dead and it serves a purpose too. For some it’s a resting place and for others it is a good place to dry off after nice bath….

Personally I love trees in water. The reflections they make is awesome and I love capturing it. Walking around the pond one can capture it from different angles and it never looks the same….

Thank you for taking the time to look at my work.

“If you can dream it you can do it.” Walt Disney

Egyptian Geese: Part 3/3

Here is the last of the series of photos on Egyptian Geese taken at Sonstraaldam in Durbanville.

Hope you have a lovely day….

Thank you for taking the time to look at my work.

“If you can dream it you can do it.”

Bontebok…

I read on Instagram that in 1930 there were only 30 Bontebok left in the world….

According to Wikipedia they were killed as pests and at one stage only 17 existed.

Today Bontebok are only found in South Africa in protective areas like our Sanparks.

I was lucky and got a awesome photo opportunity when I visited The West Coast National Park and Potsberg in September last year. The Bontebok walked straight to my car like a model and looked straight into the lens….

At another spot I captured a few in a field. When I edited the photos I spotted a calf and his mom….

Thank you for taking the time to look at my work. Please feel free to let me know what you think.

If you can dream it you can do it…..