Durbanville Nature Reserve – Dainty Soldier-in-a-box – 1

Description:

Albuca cooperi is a bulbous perennial, between 35-60cm, with the outer bulb tunics decaying into fibers at the top, and 2 or 3 slender, channeled leaves that clasp the stem in the lower part and are warty towards the base. It bears a raceme of fragrant, nodding yellow flowers with broad green bands. 15-25mm long; the inner petals have a hanging flap at the tip and the outer stamens are sterile.

Albuca cooperi flowers mainly from September to November.

Habitat:

Albuca cooperi can be found in stony, mostly sandy slopes and flats, sometimes limestone, from Namaqualand to the Eastern Cape.

Dainty Soldier-in-a-box, Albuca cooperi, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/7.1
  • Exposure Time: 1/320 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Fynbos by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Pet Photography: Willow #17

It was time for a proper photoshoot for Willow. I have hundreds of cellphone photos of her and Oprah. But I have not taken proper photos of them in a while. Hope you enjoy the photos.

Willow, Labrador Mix, Kraaifontein, Cape Town, South Africa

Technical Information about Photo:

  • Location: Kraaifontein, Cape Town, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2022-09-16
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS II USM
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/40 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-160
  • Focal Length: 70 mm
  • Metering Mode: Evaluative Metering
  • Tripod: None
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Pet Photography: Willow #16

It was time for a proper photoshoot for Willow. I have hundreds of cellphone photos of her and Oprah. But I have not taken proper photos of them in a while. Hope you enjoy the photos.

Willow, Labrador Mix, Kraaifontein, Cape Town, South Africa

Technical Information about Photo:

  • Location: Kraaifontein, Cape Town, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2022-09-16
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS II USM
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/40 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-160
  • Focal Length: 70 mm
  • Metering Mode: Evaluative Metering
  • Tripod: None
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Pet Photography: Willow #15

It was time for a proper photoshoot for Willow. I have hundreds of cellphone photos of her and Oprah. But I have not taken proper photos of them in a while. Hope you enjoy the photos.

Willow, Labrador Mix, Kraaifontein, Cape Town, South Africa

Technical Information about Photo:

  • Location: Kraaifontein, Cape Town, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2022-09-16
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS II USM
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/40 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-160
  • Focal Length: 70 mm
  • Metering Mode: Evaluative Metering
  • Tripod: None
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Pet Photography: Willow #14

It was time for a proper photoshoot for Willow. I have hundreds of cellphone photos of her and Oprah. But I have not taken proper photos of them in a while. Hope you enjoy the photos.

Willow, Labrador Mix, Kraaifontein, Cape Town, South Africa

Technical Information about Photo:

  • Location: Kraaifontein, Cape Town, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2022-09-16
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS II USM
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/40 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-160
  • Focal Length: 70 mm
  • Metering Mode: Evaluative Metering
  • Tripod: None
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Pet Photography: Willow #13

It was time for a proper photoshoot for Willow. I have hundreds of cellphone photos of her and Oprah. But I have not taken proper photos of them in a while. Hope you enjoy the photos.

Willow, Labrador Mix, Kraaifontein, Cape Town, South Africa

Technical Information about Photo:

  • Location: Kraaifontein, Cape Town, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2022-09-16
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS II USM
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/40 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 70 mm
  • Metering Mode: Evaluative Metering
  • Tripod: None
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Pet Photography: Willow #12

It was time for a proper photoshoot for Willow. I have hundreds of cellphone photos of her and Oprah. But I have not taken proper photos of them in a while. Hope you enjoy the photos.

Willow, Labrador Mix, Kraaifontein, Cape Town, South Africa

Technical Information about Photo:

  • Location: Kraaifontein, Cape Town, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2022-09-16
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS II USM
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/160 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 70 mm
  • Metering Mode: Evaluative Metering
  • Tripod: None
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Pet Photography: Willow #11

It was time for a proper photoshoot for Willow. I have hundreds of cellphone photos of her and Oprah. But I have not taken proper photos of them in a while. Hope you enjoy the photos.

Willow, Labrador Mix, Kraaifontein, Cape Town, South Africa

Technical Information about Photo:

  • Location: Kraaifontein, Cape Town, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2022-09-16
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS II USM
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/250 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 91 mm
  • Metering Mode: Evaluative Metering
  • Tripod: None
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Pet Photography: Willow #10

It was time for a proper photoshoot for Willow. I have hundreds of cellphone photos of her and Oprah. But I have not taken proper photos of them in a while. Hope you enjoy the photos.

Willow, Labrador Mix, Kraaifontein, Cape Town, South Africa

Technical Information about Photo:

  • Location: Kraaifontein, Cape Town, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2022-09-16
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS II USM
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/160 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 84 mm
  • Metering Mode: Evaluative Metering
  • Tripod: None
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Pet Photography: Willow #09

It was time for a proper photoshoot for Willow. I have hundreds of cellphone photos of her and Oprah. But I have not taken proper photos of them in a while. Hope you enjoy the photos.

Willow, Labrador Mix, Kraaifontein, Cape Town, South Africa

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Pet Photography: Willow #08

It was time for a proper photoshoot for Willow. I have hundreds of cellphone photos of her and Oprah. But I have not taken proper photos of them in a while. Hope you enjoy the photos.

Willow, Labrador Mix, Kraaifontein, Cape Town, South Africa

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

My Photo Someone’s Quote: 19 September 2022

GOOD MORNING

Wish It, Dream It, Do It: Turn the Life You’re Living into the Life You Want.

 

 “There is only one certainty in life and that is that nothing is certain.” ~ G.K. Chesterton 

With all my heart Thank you for your continued support and for taking the time to look at my post.

May love and laughter brighten up your day and warm your heart. May peace and contentment bless your life with the joy that endures every season.

Have an awesome day

🤗Big Virtual hug🤗

Coreen

My Photo Someone’s Quote: 18 September 2022

GOOD MORNING

Wish It, Dream It, Do It: Turn the Life You’re Living into the Life You Want.

 

  “No day in which you learn something is a complete loss.” ~ David Eddings

With all my heart Thank you for your continued support and for taking the time to look at my post.

May love and laughter brighten up your day and warm your heart. May peace and contentment bless your life with the joy that endures every season.

Have an awesome day

🤗Big Virtual hug🤗

Coreen

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Dailstee -4

Description:

Gerbera crocea is a tufted perennial to 40cm with a rosette of petiolate, lance-shaped to elliptical leaves that are hairless to sparsely cobwebby beneath, their margins lightly toothed and rolled under.

Heads 12-23 mm long, 20-35 mm wide. Ray florets are very variable in color: pink or white, sometimes mauve, crimson, maroon, cream, reddish, magenta, purplish or yellowish-purple, in other cases white above, red-maroon to brownish-coppery below, or pinkish to mauve above, darker below. Disc florets reported as yellow or purple, tube 4-8 mm long, limbs 2.5-3.5 mm long.

Gerbera crocea flowers throughout the year but mainly from October to January.

Habitat:

Gerbera crocea can be found from the Cape Peninsula and eastwards to around Montagu and Bredasdorp -and as far northwards – as around Clanwilliam.

They are mainly found on hills and slopes, in stony and rocky, sandy soil, often on recently burnt ground, rarely in moist habitats; quite common.

Dailstee, Gerbera crocea, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/7.1
  • Exposure Time: 1/250 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Fynbos by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Dailstee -3

Description:

Gerbera crocea is a tufted perennial to 40cm with a rosette of petiolate, lance-shaped to elliptical leaves that are hairless to sparsely cobwebby beneath, their margins lightly toothed and rolled under.

Heads 12-23 mm long, 20-35 mm wide. Ray florets are very variable in color: pink or white, sometimes mauve, crimson, maroon, cream, reddish, magenta, purplish or yellowish-purple, in other cases white above, red-maroon to brownish-coppery below, or pinkish to mauve above, darker below. Disc florets reported as yellow or purple, tube 4-8 mm long, limbs 2.5-3.5 mm long.

Gerbera crocea flowers throughout the year but mainly from October to January.

Habitat:

Gerbera crocea can be found from the Cape Peninsula and eastwards to around Montagu and Bredasdorp -and as far northwards – as around Clanwilliam.

They are mainly found on hills and slopes, in stony and rocky, sandy soil, often on recently burnt ground, rarely in moist habitats; quite common.

Dailstee, Gerbera crocea, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/7.1
  • Exposure Time: 1/250 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Fynbos by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Dailstee -2

Description:

Gerbera crocea is a tufted perennial to 40cm with a rosette of petiolate, lance-shaped to elliptical leaves that are hairless to sparsely cobwebby beneath, their margins lightly toothed and rolled under.

Heads 12-23 mm long, 20-35 mm wide. Ray florets are very variable in color: pink or white, sometimes mauve, crimson, maroon, cream, reddish, magenta, purplish or yellowish-purple, in other cases white above, red-maroon to brownish-coppery below, or pinkish to mauve above, darker below. Disc florets reported as yellow or purple, tube 4-8 mm long, limbs 2.5-3.5 mm long.

Gerbera crocea flowers throughout the year but mainly from October to January.

Habitat:

Gerbera crocea can be found from the Cape Peninsula and eastwards to around Montagu and Bredasdorp -and as far northwards – as around Clanwilliam.

They are mainly found on hills and slopes, in stony and rocky, sandy soil, often on recently burnt ground, rarely in moist habitats; quite common.

Dailstee, Gerbera crocea, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/7.1
  • Exposure Time: 1/250 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Fynbos by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Dailstee -1

Description:

Gerbera crocea is a tufted perennial to 40cm with a rosette of petiolate, lance-shaped to elliptical leaves that are hairless to sparsely cobwebby beneath, their margins lightly toothed and rolled under.

Heads 12-23 mm long, 20-35 mm wide. Ray florets are very variable in color: pink or white, sometimes mauve, crimson, maroon, cream, reddish, magenta, purplish or yellowish-purple, in other cases white above, red-maroon to brownish-coppery below, or pinkish to mauve above, darker below. Disc florets reported as yellow or purple, tube 4-8 mm long, limbs 2.5-3.5 mm long.

Gerbera crocea flowers throughout the year but mainly from October to January.

Habitat:

Gerbera crocea can be found from the Cape Peninsula and eastwards to around Montagu and Bredasdorp -and as far northwards – as around Clanwilliam.

They are mainly found on hills and slopes, in stony and rocky, sandy soil, often on recently burnt ground, rarely in moist habitats; quite common.

Dailstee, Gerbera crocea, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/7.1
  • Exposure Time: 1/250 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: Field Guide to Fynbos by John Manning

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – African Blue Sage -3

Also known as Blue Sage, Wild Sage, Wilde Salie and Bloublomsalie.

Description:

Salvia africana is a decorative, aromatic shrub with medicinal properties. Keep it neat and pruned and it will reward you with flowers almost all year round.

It is a soft, greyish, hairy, much-branched shrub up to 2 m tall. The leaves are greenish on the upper surface, covered with grey hairs and dotted with glands on the lower surface, strongly aromatic, simple, opposite, obovate (egg-shaped but broader towards the tip) and sometimes toothed.

Flowers are produced from midwinter to midsummer (June to January) peaking in spring to early summer (Aug.-Dec.), in whorls, crowded at the tips of the stems. The corolla is two-lipped, the lips roughly equal in length; the upper lip is blue to bluish-purple or pinkish and hooded; the lower one is usually white in the center with darker spots, and is turned down at the edge, giving the impression of a gaping mouth.

The style is long, slender and curved, and sticks out beyond the hooded upper lip. The stamens are strangely shaped. The filament of each stamen is attached to one side of the lower part of the corolla tube. A cross-piece that is hinged so that it can move up and down is attached at the top end of the filament. This cross-piece carries the anther at one end and a ‘pedal’ at the other.

The ‘pedal’ is in fact the other half of the anther, transformed into a structure that a visiting bee has to press on as it probes for nectar, causing the hinged anther to move down and deposit pollen on the back of the bee. The calyx is funnel-shaped, dotted with glands and covered in long, silky grey hairs, green with pinkish purple tips. It persists long after the flower has dropped and enlarges at the fruiting stage, becoming thin, light and papery by the time the seeds are mature.

The fruit consists of four 1-seeded, small, rounded nutlets that are formed at the base of the flower, inside the calyx. They remain attached at the base of the calyx after the flower drops, falling out when mature.

Habitat:

Salvia africana is found on sandy slopes and flats from Namaqualand in the Northern Cape to the Cape Peninsula and Caledon in the Western Cape. It grows in fynbos.

Salvia africana is pollinated by bees and the flower is adapted to assist in pollination-see the description above to recap the structure of the flower. The bottom petal is a platform for the bee to land on. As it probes for nectar, it presses against the ‘pedal’, which causes the hinged anthers to move down and deposit pollen on the back of the bee, while the curved stigma collects pollen that it has already picked up from other flowers it visited previously.

Uses:

Many African salvias, including Salvia africana have long been used by the people of Africa as medicinal plants and to flavor food. A remedy made by mixing S. africana tea with Epsom salts and lemon juice was used by the early settlers in South Africa to treat stomach troubles, including colic, diarrhea, flatulence, heartburn, gripes and indigestion.

It was also given to cows after calving to help in the expulsion of the placenta. The Khoisan people used S. africana to treat coughs, colds and women’s ailments. The leaves, mixed with those of Ballota africana (kattekruie) were also used to treat fevers and measles.

Margaret Roberts recipe for sage tea is to pour one cup of boiling water over one tablespoon of fresh leaves, allow to draw for 5 minutes, sweeten with honey and add a slice of lemon for taste. To ease a cough, including whooping cough, sip a little frequently. To treat colds, flu and chest ailments and for painful or excessive menstruation, drink half a cup four times a day.

The tea is also an excellent gargle for sore throats and night coughing. Even chewing a fresh leaf will ease a sore throat and help restore a lost voice. This tea can also be used externally as a mildly antiseptic wash. A stronger brew using one tablespoon of fresh leaves chopped into one tablespoon of honey and two tablespoons of lemon juice makes a soothing cough mixture for a persistent cough: take one tablespoon every half hour until the cough eases.

African Blue Sage, Salvia africana, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/7.1
  • Exposure Time: 1/200 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 135 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: PlantZafrica.com

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – African Blue Sage -2

Also known as Blue Sage, Wild Sage, Wilde Salie and Bloublomsalie.

Description:

Salvia africana is a decorative, aromatic shrub with medicinal properties. Keep it neat and pruned and it will reward you with flowers almost all year round.

It is a soft, greyish, hairy, much-branched shrub up to 2 m tall. The leaves are greenish on the upper surface, covered with grey hairs and dotted with glands on the lower surface, strongly aromatic, simple, opposite, obovate (egg-shaped but broader towards the tip) and sometimes toothed.

Flowers are produced from midwinter to midsummer (June to January) peaking in spring to early summer (Aug.-Dec.), in whorls, crowded at the tips of the stems. The corolla is two-lipped, the lips roughly equal in length; the upper lip is blue to bluish-purple or pinkish and hooded; the lower one is usually white in the center with darker spots, and is turned down at the edge, giving the impression of a gaping mouth.

The style is long, slender and curved, and sticks out beyond the hooded upper lip. The stamens are strangely shaped. The filament of each stamen is attached to one side of the lower part of the corolla tube. A cross-piece that is hinged so that it can move up and down is attached at the top end of the filament. This cross-piece carries the anther at one end and a ‘pedal’ at the other.

The ‘pedal’ is in fact the other half of the anther, transformed into a structure that a visiting bee has to press on as it probes for nectar, causing the hinged anther to move down and deposit pollen on the back of the bee. The calyx is funnel-shaped, dotted with glands and covered in long, silky grey hairs, green with pinkish purple tips. It persists long after the flower has dropped and enlarges at the fruiting stage, becoming thin, light and papery by the time the seeds are mature.

The fruit consists of four 1-seeded, small, rounded nutlets that are formed at the base of the flower, inside the calyx. They remain attached at the base of the calyx after the flower drops, falling out when mature.

Habitat:

Salvia africana is found on sandy slopes and flats from Namaqualand in the Northern Cape to the Cape Peninsula and Caledon in the Western Cape. It grows in fynbos.

Salvia africana is pollinated by bees and the flower is adapted to assist in pollination-see the description above to recap the structure of the flower. The bottom petal is a platform for the bee to land on. As it probes for nectar, it presses against the ‘pedal’, which causes the hinged anthers to move down and deposit pollen on the back of the bee, while the curved stigma collects pollen that it has already picked up from other flowers it visited previously.

Uses:

Many African salvias, including Salvia africana have long been used by the people of Africa as medicinal plants and to flavor food. A remedy made by mixing S. africana tea with Epsom salts and lemon juice was used by the early settlers in South Africa to treat stomach troubles, including colic, diarrhea, flatulence, heartburn, gripes and indigestion.

It was also given to cows after calving to help in the expulsion of the placenta. The Khoisan people used S. africana to treat coughs, colds and women’s ailments. The leaves, mixed with those of Ballota africana (kattekruie) were also used to treat fevers and measles.

Margaret Roberts recipe for sage tea is to pour one cup of boiling water over one tablespoon of fresh leaves, allow to draw for 5 minutes, sweeten with honey and add a slice of lemon for taste. To ease a cough, including whooping cough, sip a little frequently. To treat colds, flu and chest ailments and for painful or excessive menstruation, drink half a cup four times a day.

The tea is also an excellent gargle for sore throats and night coughing. Even chewing a fresh leaf will ease a sore throat and help restore a lost voice. This tea can also be used externally as a mildly antiseptic wash. A stronger brew using one tablespoon of fresh leaves chopped into one tablespoon of honey and two tablespoons of lemon juice makes a soothing cough mixture for a persistent cough: take one tablespoon every half hour until the cough eases.

African Blue Sage, Salvia africana, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/7.1
  • Exposure Time: 1/250 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 90 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: PlantZafrica.com

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – African Blue Sage -1

Also known as Blue Sage, Wild Sage, Wilde Salie and Bloublomsalie.

Description:

Salvia africana is a decorative, aromatic shrub with medicinal properties. Keep it neat and pruned and it will reward you with flowers almost all year round.

It is a soft, greyish, hairy, much-branched shrub up to 2 m tall. The leaves are greenish on the upper surface, covered with grey hairs and dotted with glands on the lower surface, strongly aromatic, simple, opposite, obovate (egg-shaped but broader towards the tip) and sometimes toothed.

Flowers are produced from midwinter to midsummer (June to January) peaking in spring to early summer (Aug.-Dec.), in whorls, crowded at the tips of the stems. The corolla is two-lipped, the lips roughly equal in length; the upper lip is blue to bluish-purple or pinkish and hooded; the lower one is usually white in the center with darker spots, and is turned down at the edge, giving the impression of a gaping mouth.

The style is long, slender and curved, and sticks out beyond the hooded upper lip. The stamens are strangely shaped. The filament of each stamen is attached to one side of the lower part of the corolla tube. A cross-piece that is hinged so that it can move up and down is attached at the top end of the filament. This cross-piece carries the anther at one end and a ‘pedal’ at the other.

The ‘pedal’ is in fact the other half of the anther, transformed into a structure that a visiting bee has to press on as it probes for nectar, causing the hinged anther to move down and deposit pollen on the back of the bee. The calyx is funnel-shaped, dotted with glands and covered in long, silky grey hairs, green with pinkish purple tips. It persists long after the flower has dropped and enlarges at the fruiting stage, becoming thin, light and papery by the time the seeds are mature.

The fruit consists of four 1-seeded, small, rounded nutlets that are formed at the base of the flower, inside the calyx. They remain attached at the base of the calyx after the flower drops, falling out when mature.

Habitat:

Salvia africana is found on sandy slopes and flats from Namaqualand in the Northern Cape to the Cape Peninsula and Caledon in the Western Cape. It grows in fynbos.

Salvia africana is pollinated by bees and the flower is adapted to assist in pollination-see the description above to recap the structure of the flower. The bottom petal is a platform for the bee to land on. As it probes for nectar, it presses against the ‘pedal’, which causes the hinged anthers to move down and deposit pollen on the back of the bee, while the curved stigma collects pollen that it has already picked up from other flowers it visited previously.

Uses:

Many African salvias, including Salvia africana have long been used by the people of Africa as medicinal plants and to flavor food. A remedy made by mixing S. africana tea with Epsom salts and lemon juice was used by the early settlers in South Africa to treat stomach troubles, including colic, diarrhea, flatulence, heartburn, gripes and indigestion.

It was also given to cows after calving to help in the expulsion of the placenta. The Khoisan people used S. africana to treat coughs, colds and women’s ailments. The leaves, mixed with those of Ballota africana (kattekruie) were also used to treat fevers and measles.

Margaret Roberts recipe for sage tea is to pour one cup of boiling water over one tablespoon of fresh leaves, allow to draw for 5 minutes, sweeten with honey and add a slice of lemon for taste. To ease a cough, including whooping cough, sip a little frequently. To treat colds, flu and chest ailments and for painful or excessive menstruation, drink half a cup four times a day.

The tea is also an excellent gargle for sore throats and night coughing. Even chewing a fresh leaf will ease a sore throat and help restore a lost voice. This tea can also be used externally as a mildly antiseptic wash. A stronger brew using one tablespoon of fresh leaves chopped into one tablespoon of honey and two tablespoons of lemon juice makes a soothing cough mixture for a persistent cough: take one tablespoon every half hour until the cough eases.

African Blue Sage, Salvia africana, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/7.1
  • Exposure Time: 1/250 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: PlantZafrica.com

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Pet Photography: Willow #07

It was time for a proper photoshoot for Willow. I have hundreds of cellphone photos of her and Oprah. But I have not taken proper photos of them in a while. Hope you enjoy the photos.

Willow, Labrador Mix, Kraaifontein, Cape Town, South Africa

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Pet Photography: Willow #06

It was time for a proper photoshoot for Willow. I have hundreds of cellphone photos of her and Oprah. But I have not taken proper photos of them in a while. Hope you enjoy the photos.

Willow, Labrador Mix, Kraaifontein, Cape Town, South Africa

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

My Photo Someone’s Quote: 17 September 2022

GOOD MORNING

Wish It, Dream It, Do It: Turn the Life You’re Living into the Life You Want.

 

 “Mistakes are a fact of life. It is the response to the error that counts.” ~ Nikki Giovanni

With all my heart Thank you for your continued support and for taking the time to look at my post.

May love and laughter brighten up your day and warm your heart. May peace and contentment bless your life with the joy that endures every season.

Have an awesome day

🤗Big Virtual hug🤗

Coreen

Pet Photography: Willow #05

It was time for a proper photoshoot for Willow. I have hundreds of cellphone photos of her and Oprah. But I have not taken proper photos of them in a while. Hope you enjoy the photos.

Willow, Labrador Mix, Kraaifontein, Cape Town, South Africa

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Pet Photography: Willow #04

It was time for a proper photoshoot for Willow. I have hundreds of cellphone photos of her and Oprah. But I have not taken proper photos of them in a while. Hope you enjoy the photos.

Willow, Labrador Mix, Kraaifontein, Cape Town, South Africa

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Pet Photography: Willow #03

It was time for a proper photoshoot for Willow. I have hundreds of cellphone photos of her and Oprah. But I have not taken proper photos of them in a while. Hope you enjoy the photos.

Willow, Labrador Mix, Kraaifontein, Cape Town, South Africa

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Pet Photography: Willow #02

It was time for a proper photoshoot for Willow. I have hundreds of cellphone photos of her and Oprah. But I have not taken proper photos of them in a while. Hope you enjoy the photos.

Willow, Labrador Mix, Kraaifontein, Cape Town, South Africa

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Pet Photography: Willow #01

It was time for a proper photoshoot for Willow. I have hundreds of cellphone photos of her and Oprah. But I have not taken proper photos of them in a while. Hope you enjoy the photos.

Willow, Labrador Mix, Kraaifontein, Cape Town, South Africa

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and I do try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #419

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

Information about photo:

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 32 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #418

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

Information about photo:

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #417

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

Information about photo:

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #416

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

Information about photo:

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 80 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #415

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

Information about photo:

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 135 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #414

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

Information about photo:

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 110 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #413

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

Information about photo:

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 110 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #412

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

Information about photo:

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 50 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #411

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

Information about photo:

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 35 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #410

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

Information about photo:

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 35 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #409

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 35 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #408

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 50 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #407

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 50 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #406

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #405

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #404

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #403

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

My Photo Someone’s Quote: 16 September 2022

GOOD MORNING

Wish It, Dream It, Do It: Turn the Life You’re Living into the Life You Want.

 

  “Each generation imagines itself to be more intelligent than the one that went before it and wiser than the one that comes after it.” ~ George Orwell 

With all my heart Thank you for your continued support and for taking the time to look at my post.

May love and laughter brighten up your day and warm your heart. May peace and contentment bless your life with the joy that endures every season.

Have an awesome day

🤗Big Virtual hug🤗

Coreen

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #402

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Grand Tour of Scotland: Day 9: 20 August 2019 ~Exploring the Isle of Lewis and Harris #401

Calanais Standing Stones

“The Calanais Standing Stones were erected between 2900 and 2600 BC – before the main circle at Stonehenge in England. Ritual activity at the site may have continued for 2000 years. The area inside the circle was levelled and the site gradually became covered with peat between 1000 and 500 BC.

Peat cutting around the site in 1857 revealed the true height of the stones. It’s possible that there’s plenty more archaeology sealed beneath the peat that covers much of the Western Isles.

There are at least 11 smaller stone circles surrounding Calanais. Some of these date from much later than the central circle, which indicates the complex was in use for several centuries. These are crucial to help with the understanding of the significance of this area, and how the landscape was used by prehistoric people.

The stones are set on a prominent ridge, easily visible from land and sea for miles around.

The Western Isles would have been a lot warmer 5,000 years ago, and food and wildlife were plentiful. The extensive ritual landscape around of which Calanais is a part, speaks of a thriving and sophisticated society.

The form of the site and the artefacts found during excavation also show that this community was part of a wider culture which involved the construction of earthen enclosures known as henges and impressive circles of timber or stone.

~ Historic Environment Scotland

Calanais Standing Stones, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland

  • Location: Calanais Standing Stones and surroundings, Outer Hebrides, Isle of Lewis and Harris, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Date Taken: 2019-08-20
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm F/3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: JPEG
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/4000 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-500
  • Focal Length: 18 mm
  • Metering Mode: Center Weighted Average
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland one Photo at a time. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and do try to answer them all.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also Honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Pink Watsonia – 4

Also known as, Suurkanol in Afrikaans

Description:

Watsonia barbonica, a magnificent bulbous plant with tall spikes of rose-pink, trumpet-shaped flowers makes a picturesque display, flowering for up to 4 or 5 weeks – a beautiful garden subject that needs little maintenance.

Watsonia barbonica is a tender to half-hardy herbaceous perennial that grows up to 2 m high. It is deciduous, growing during autumn-winter-spring and dying back after flowering in spring to early summer and remaining dormant during summer. The rootstock is a corm, 30-40 mm in diameter with grey-brown tunics. It bears upright fans of 5-6, up to 8 glossy, broad, sword-shaped leaves, 20-40 mm wide, that are one to two thirds as long as the flower spike. The margins of the leaves are without color (hyaline) and moderately thickened.

The flowering stem usually bears two or more small bracts in the upper part, is usually branched and reaches up to 2 m in height. The flower is a spike, the main axis bearing up to 20 flowers and the branching (lateral) spikes up to 10 flowers. The flowers are large and showy, pale to deep pink to light purple, and faintly fragrant. The tepals have a darker midline, and a white streak at the base and very occasionally a plant is found where the whole tepal is white.

Flowering time is during late spring to early summer-from October to early December and sometimes into January. The fruit is an oblong capsule, more or less woody, sometimes widening at the apex, splitting to release winged seeds, 8-12 x 2.5 mm.

Habitat:

Watsonia borbonica grows in the extreme southwest of the Western Cape, from Tulbagh southwards to the Cape Peninsula and eastwards to Bredasdorp. Its habitat is mainly rocky sandstone slopes or well-drained slopes of clay and granite, and sometimes in deep sandy soil at the foot of the mountains.

It is particularly abundant after fires and is known at some sites to only flower in the first and second years following a fire. Abundant flowering after a fire is followed by the production of masses of seed, which increases the number of successful seedlings. In areas that have burnt, Watsonia borbonica provides a major source of food for nectar-feeding insects and birds, and for the various rodents that eat the seed produced.

Watsonia borbonica is pollinated by large, solitary bees, mainly of the family Apidae: subfamily Anthophorinae. The bees visit the flowers in the early morning, seeking nectar and collecting pollen from flowers that have just opened. The styles of the flowers only unfurl later on their second day and become receptive, and at the same time the nectar levels rise. The bees visiting for the nectar transfer some of the pollen collected earlier from the freshly opened flowers. By noon there is no more nectar or pollen and the bees move away. Goldlatt 1989 and John Manning.

Sunbirds have been seen to visit the flowers as well, but soon lose interest, probably because only a small amount of nectar is produced. Long- tongued flies also visit and may play a role in pollination ( John Manning (pers.comm.)

Pink Watsonia, Watsonia borbonica, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/400 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: PlantZafrica.com

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.

Durbanville Nature Reserve – Pink Watsonia – 3

Also known as, Suurkanol in Afrikaans

Description:

Watsonia barbonica, a magnificent bulbous plant with tall spikes of rose-pink, trumpet-shaped flowers makes a picturesque display, flowering for up to 4 or 5 weeks – a beautiful garden subject that needs little maintenance.

Watsonia barbonica is a tender to half-hardy herbaceous perennial that grows up to 2 m high. It is deciduous, growing during autumn-winter-spring and dying back after flowering in spring to early summer and remaining dormant during summer. The rootstock is a corm, 30-40 mm in diameter with grey-brown tunics. It bears upright fans of 5-6, up to 8 glossy, broad, sword-shaped leaves, 20-40 mm wide, that are one to two thirds as long as the flower spike. The margins of the leaves are without color (hyaline) and moderately thickened.

The flowering stem usually bears two or more small bracts in the upper part, is usually branched and reaches up to 2 m in height. The flower is a spike, the main axis bearing up to 20 flowers and the branching (lateral) spikes up to 10 flowers. The flowers are large and showy, pale to deep pink to light purple, and faintly fragrant. The tepals have a darker midline, and a white streak at the base and very occasionally a plant is found where the whole tepal is white.

Flowering time is during late spring to early summer-from October to early December and sometimes into January. The fruit is an oblong capsule, more or less woody, sometimes widening at the apex, splitting to release winged seeds, 8-12 x 2.5 mm.

Habitat:

Watsonia borbonica grows in the extreme southwest of the Western Cape, from Tulbagh southwards to the Cape Peninsula and eastwards to Bredasdorp. Its habitat is mainly rocky sandstone slopes or well-drained slopes of clay and granite, and sometimes in deep sandy soil at the foot of the mountains.

It is particularly abundant after fires and is known at some sites to only flower in the first and second years following a fire. Abundant flowering after a fire is followed by the production of masses of seed, which increases the number of successful seedlings. In areas that have burnt, Watsonia borbonica provides a major source of food for nectar-feeding insects and birds, and for the various rodents that eat the seed produced.

Watsonia borbonica is pollinated by large, solitary bees, mainly of the family Apidae: subfamily Anthophorinae. The bees visit the flowers in the early morning, seeking nectar and collecting pollen from flowers that have just opened. The styles of the flowers only unfurl later on their second day and become receptive, and at the same time the nectar levels rise. The bees visiting for the nectar transfer some of the pollen collected earlier from the freshly opened flowers. By noon there is no more nectar or pollen and the bees move away. Goldlatt 1989 and John Manning.

Sunbirds have been seen to visit the flowers as well, but soon lose interest, probably because only a small amount of nectar is produced. Long- tongued flies also visit and may play a role in pollination ( John Manning (pers.comm.)

Pink Watsonia, Watsonia borbonica, Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Location: Durbanville Nature Reserve, Durbanville, South Africa
  • Date Taken: 2020-10-25
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-200 mm 3-5.6 IS
  • Exposure Program: Manual
  • Image Quality: RAW
  • F-Stop: f/5.6
  • Exposure Time: 1/400 sec
  • ISO Speed: ISO-100
  • Focal Length: 40 mm
  • Metering Mode: Spot Metering
  • Handheld
  • Post Processing: Adobe Photoshop CS6
  • Photographer: Coreen Kuhn
  • Information: PlantZafrica.com

Thank you with all my heart for stopping by and having a look at my photo.

If you like what you see please press the like button, share and leave a comment. I read all my comments, and try to answer them all.

Have a Blessed day

Coreen

PS. Please support me on☕ Ko-Fi ☕. I have to save up enough money to cover some of the expenses for my Landscape Photography Trip to Namibia and also honoring my promise to Dad to go back to Scotland.