Good Evening: 19 August 2021

What a beautiful day we had. It started with rain and ended with a lovely sunny day. Back in Vanrynsdorp and it started raining around 4:00pm.

Thank you to our Heavenly Father for giving us the perfect day to capture His handy work.

Our first stop was Nuwerus. A small little town with nothing really. But the flowers will be beautiful when it opens. It was still to cold and rainy when we got there. We then took a dirt road to Lutzville. Luckily for us about 10 km before Lutzville we got back onto a tar road. Not far from Lutzville is Koekenaap a very very small little town. I will show photos later.

Our next stop was Standfontein, here we had some cheese cake and coffee.

Strandfontein, West Coast, South Africa
Strandfontein, West Coast, South Africa
Strandfontein, West Coast, South Africa
Strandfontein, West Coast, South Africa
Cheese cake at Kommetjie Restaurant, Strandfontein, West Coast, South Africa
Coffee at Kommetjie Restaurant, Strandfontein, West Coast, South Africa
Strandfontein, West Coast, South Africa
Strandfontein, West Coast, South Africa
Strandfontein, West Coast, South Africa

We then headed for Doringbaai. Another small little coastal town.

Doringbaai, West Coast, South Africa
Doringbaai, West Coast, South Africa
Doringbaai, West Coast, South Africa

Along the route we stopped a lot for photos. I found some new ones I haven’t captured before again. In the end I had to put my 18-200mm lens on to get to the flowers far from the road.

Tomorrow my 18-55 mm will be working again. I tried my 10 – 18mm but it is difficult to take photos on the ground with them. Everywhere along the road is shattered glass where the people throw out their beer and wine bottles while driving.

If I want to keep doing my flower photography I will have to buy myself some padded pants and a jacket. My knees and elbows are purple from all the stones and sharp objects.

I am already thinking towards next year’s flower season. Want to arrange with some of the farmers around here if I can spend a day on their farm and capturing all the flowers, succulents and other plants on that day.

Tomorrow morning we must get up early if we want to cover the west coast road on our way home. I am looking forward to this. I am planning to stop for breakfast in Klawer tomorrow. The rest of the day will sort itself out.

That is all for now friends. We are heading out for dinner tonight and I have to get ready.

Thank you for your ongoing support and taking the time to look at my post and photos.

Wishing you a peaceful nights rest.

ūü§óBig Virtual Hug

Coreen

Good evening

Good evening friends,

Dad and I had a lovely time on the road today.

After Breakfast at the Bagdad Cafe we headed to Loeriesfontein. There we visited the Fred Turner Museum and later The Quiver Tree Forest on our way back.

We had rain up to about 55 km before Loeriesfontein. I am very grateful for the beautiful cloudy morning. We headed back to Nieuwoudtville around 13h00. It started raining again when we were about 20km from Nieuwoudtville.

We had lunch at Die Nedersetting 1897 Restaurant and enjoyed the warm fireplace. We sat at table 8 again.

I hope you enjoyed the photos I took with my Huawei P30 lite. I can’t wait to see my photos on my computer screen. I am super excited.

So far I have been lucky to capture plants and flowers I have not seen before. Dad bought me two books of flowers of the area to help me identify them.

View of Knersvlakte from the Vanrynspass on R27
View of Knersvlakte from the Vanrynspass on R27
View of Knersvlakte from the Vanrynspass on R27
View of Knersvlakte from the Vanrynspass on R27
Fred Turner Museum, Loeriesfontein
Fred Turner Museum, Loeriesfontein
Fred Turner Museum, Loeriesfontein
Quiver Tree Forest, Nieuwoudtville
Quiver Tree Forest, Nieuwoudtville
Quiver Tree Forest, Nieuwoudtville
Quiver Tree Forest, Nieuwoudtville
Dad had the soup of the day, bean soup, Die Nedersetting Restaurant, Nieuwoudtville
My lunch, Sheepspie and salad, Die Nedersetting Restaurant, Nieuwoudtville
Salad, Die Nedersetting Restaurant, Nieuwoudtville
Sheepspie, Die Nedersetting Restaurant, Nieuwoudtville

Thank you for your support and taking the time to look at my post.

Have a wonderful evening.

Coreen

Morning Greetings: 8 July 2021

Good morning everybody,

Hope you all had a good nights rest. I had a very busy night…. In my dreams that is….

Yesterday I started reading my book, Hero by Rhonda Byrne…. Normally after dinner I would edit some more, but last night my neck and shoulders was aching and I decided to rather switch off the computer and do some reading.

Well, I made many lists in the past while working through The Magic and I am very proud to say that in a years time I did finish at least one thing on my list. But today I am going to take my time and really think about my bucket list. After I have read a few of the books by Don Miguel Ruiz and Rhonda Byrne my priorities changed. A few things on my list will not change at all.

My Bucket list so far

  • Move to Scotland – Doing research on Scotland and surrounding Islands
  • Learn a third language – I am busy with Gaelic
  • Become a Travel and Landscape Photographer – Busy doing a Advanced Module on Travel and Landscape Photography
  • Do a course on how to write articles
  • Do an Advanced Driving Course
  • Fly in a hot air balloon and take lots of photos

According to the weather forecast we are going to freeze our butts off again day. A maximum temperature of 15¬įC and heavy rain all day long is predicted.

It is freezing outside….
Aloe, A gift from my brother.

On my To-Do List for today:

  • Edit
  • Schedule posts
  • Read the next Chapter of Hero
  • Gaelic Lesson 2 hours
  • Prepare dinner: Making Gammon, Sweet potatoes, Rice and Cauliflower with White Sauce

With all my heart, thank you for your ongoing support and taking the time to read my post. I am truly grateful for every view, like, follow, and comment I receive.

May you have a day filled with laughter and love.

ūü§óBig Virtual Hug

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Inverness

Day 5: 15 August 2019: Exploring Inverness – Part 1

The Castle Tavern, Inverness, Scotland
The Castle Tavern, Inverness, Scotland

Flora MacDonald Statue

Flora MacDonald was born on the island of South Uist, in the Outer Hebrides, in 1722. After her father’s death, she was brought up under the care of the chief of her clan, the Macdonalds of Clanranald.

In 1746, 24-year-old Flora was living on the neighboring island of Benbecula. And it was here that she met Bonnie Prince Charlie ‚Äď and stepped into the pages of history.

Charles Edward Stuart, better known in history as Bonnie Prince Charlie, was the leader of the Jacobite Rising in 1745. His goal was to reclaim the family title to the English, Scottish, French and Irish thrones. After barely escaping the Battle of Culloden, he was being tracked down by ‚ÄúThe Butcher,‚ÄĚ Prince William of Great Britain, when Flora MacDonald offered to help. She disguised him as her maid while transporting him in a boat to Skye.

This bronze statue of the Scottish heroine was created in 1896. It stands near the entrance of the Inverness Castle.

Flora MacDonald, Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Flora MacDonald, Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Flora MacDonald, Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Flora MacDonald, Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland

Inverness Castle

Inverness Castle is right in the heart of Inverness city overlooking the River Ness. Anyone visiting Inverness will see it dominating the River Ness which it has guarded for centuries.

Inverness Castle is largely a nineteenth century construction although fragments of the medieval fortification survive most notably the well and part of the bastion wall. The castle remains in use as a functioning court and therefore there is no public (tourist) access to the interior. Cromwell’s Fort has also been virtually obliterated although a clock tower survives as does a short stretch of the earth rampart.

Only two parts of the medieval castle survive. In between the County Hall and Sheriff’s Court is the castle well, restored in 1909. A short section of retaining wall is the only other part of the medieval structure intact today.

In front of the castle is a statue of Flora MacDonald and her dog. MacDonald is famous for her role in helping Bonnie Prince Charlie to escape capture by government forces, even though she herself was not a Jacobite supporter. The sculpture was created by an Inverness native, Andrew Davidson, and was erected in 1899.

Since the castle is still in use as a Sheriff’s Court and for government proposes only one tower is open to visitors. The tower, known as Inverness Castle Viewpoint, gives wonderful 360-degree views over Inverness and the River Ness. Even if you don’t ascend the tower you can still get outstanding views across the river to Inverness Cathedral on the far bank.

Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
View of Inverness Cathedral from Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Go Nuts Art Trail, Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Go Nuts Art Trail, Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Oor Wullie’s Big Bucket Trail, Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Views from Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Views from Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Views from Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Views from Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Views from Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Views from Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Views from Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Views from Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Views from Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
View of Inverness Cathedral from Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
Views from Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland
View of Inverness Cathedral from Inverness Castle, Inverness, Scotland

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Throwback Thursday: 20 May 2021

Today we are continuing our walk through the main area of the park. We headed to the main falls, but was very disappointed when we saw it. Although it was still beautiful it was not as spectacular as the brochure and the photos on the internet. I asked one of the guides where the main fall is and he showed me to it. He could see the disappointment on my face and told me that if I want to see it in all its glory we must return in January…. So the Augrabies Falls National Park is back on my Bucket list.


Augrabies falls


This is where the mighty Orange River is at its most impressive as it thunders its way through a ravine and cascades down into a pool walled by sheer granite, 56m below. Few sights are as awesome or sound as deafening as water thundering down the 56m Augrabies Waterfall when the Orange River is in full flood.

The Falls derived their name from the Khoi word ‚ÄėAukoerebis‚Äô meaning ‚Äėplace of great noise‚Äô. Essentially a scenic park where Klipspringer and Quiver trees stand in stark silhouette against the African sky, silent sentinels in a strangely unique environment where only those that are able to adapt survive. Do not plan on just nipping in to see the main falls – there is much more to experience in this arid piece of moonscape-like land. Awesome and strikingly beautiful it offers the visitor over 50 000ha of unique riverine ecosystems to explore, with viewpoints from which to survey the dramatic landscape that unfolds below


Tree growing out of rock formation, Augrabies Falls National Park
Augrabies Falls National Park
Mom talking to the Rock Dassie at Augrabies Falls National Park
Augrabies Falls National Park
Augrabies Falls National Park
Hoofprints, Augrabies Falls National Park
Augrabies Falls National Park
Augrabies Falls National Park
Augrabies Falls National Park
Augrabies Falls National Park
Augrabies Falls National Park
Augrabies Falls National Park
Flat Lizard, Augrabies Falls National Park
Flat Lizard, Augrabies Falls National Park
Flat Lizard, Augrabies Falls National Park
Rock Dassie, Hyrax, Augrabies Falls National Park
Rock Dassie, Hyrax, Augrabies Falls National Park

That’s it for now, friends. Thank you very much for traveling back in time with me.

Have a fabulous day. 

Keep safe and healthy.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Alford #2

Day 5: 15 August 2019 – Exploring Alford

While exploring Alford one of the places on my list was the Alford Valley Railway Museum. When we got there it was closed for business. I must say I was very disappointed. I was looking forward to visit and ride on the train. I took some photos of the grounds although there was not much to see.

Alford Valley Railway Museum

The construction of the Alford Valley Railway began in 1856 and the line opened in 1859. It ran in a westerly direction from Kintore, a station on the line from Aberdeen to Inverness. The line served Kemnay Quarry and three other granite quarries in the area.

The current station building is on the site of the original granite structure which was demolished after British Rail closed the line. The passenger platform is the original. A small railway museum is housed in the railway station building. The original locomotive shed was situated to the east of the station but this has also now been demolished. To the west of the station the granite carriage shed of the previous railway is now used by the Alford Valley Railway.

Alford Valley Railway, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Valley Railway, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Valley Railway, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Valley Railway Museum in background. Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden

Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden

In 1998 at the instigation of Alford and District Rotary Club an adhoc committee consisting of representatives from all the local voluntary organizations was established. Their purpose was to create a lasting memorial to the start of the new millennium. Suggestions was made and they decided on a sculpture garden.

The land was provided by Aberdeenshire Council and the artist Louise Gardner did the layout of the garden and also created the sculptures. A local quarrying company was asked to provide pieces of Corrennie Granite which they kindly donated and conveyed to the Scottish Sculpture Workshop at Lumsden.

The garden was officially opened on 25 October 2003.

The largest stone shows a family group whit the man leading his wife and child into the new millennium. The man looking back to the second stone where domestic animals represent agriculture on which Alford was founded. When the railway reached the Village it became the natural gathering point for livestock and produce from surrounding farms destined for markets in the south.

Stone 1: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 1: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 1: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 2: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 2: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

The various animals and birds on the third Stone represent nature on which all of life depends.

Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

Children at Alford Academy were asked to create clay shields displaying some aspect of Alford or its surroundings that appealed to them. The shields, also, were taken to Lumsden where the Workshop used them to form molds for the castings of the bronzes which can be seen set into the pavement.

Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Aberdeen #5

Day 5: 15 August 2019 Exploring Aberdeen

Central Library
Views of Aberdeen, Scotland
Views of Aberdeen, Scotland

Robert Burns Statue

This bronze by Henry Bain Smith (1857-1893) was cast in July 1892 and unveiled two months later.

The daisy held by the national bard recalls his popular poem ‚ÄúTo a Mountain Daisy‚ÄĚ, written at the plough in April 1786. Burns personally identified with the daisy‚Äôs fate and despairingly reflected on his own circumstances at the time.

“Robert Burns (25 January 1759 ‚Äď 21 July 1796) (also known as Robbie Burns, Rabbie Burns, Scotland’s favorite son, the Ploughman Poet) He is widely regarded as the national poet of Scotland and is celebrated worldwide. He is the best known of the poets who have written in the Scots language, although much of his writing is also in English and a light Scots dialect, accessible to an audience beyond Scotland. He also wrote in standard English, and in these writings his political or civil commentary is often at its bluntest.

He is regarded as a pioneer of the Romantic movement, and after his death he became a great source of inspiration to the founders of both liberalism and socialism, and a cultural icon in Scotland and among the Scottish Diaspora around the world. Celebration of his life and work became almost a national charismatic cult during the 19th and 20th centuries, and his influence has long been strong on Scottish literature.

Robert Burns Statue, Aberdeen, Scotland
Robert Burns Statue, Aberdeen, Scotland

George, Duke of Gordon Statue

Located in the center of Golden Square in Aberdeen, the B-listed statue of George Gordon, 5th and last Duke of Gordon (1770 Р1836) is notable in several respects. Originally erected on Castlegate in 1844, it was the first large public statue in Aberdeen, but also said to be the first granite statue in Britain. It was later set in Golden Square in 1952.

Designed by Thomas Campbell (1790-1858) of Edinburgh, this work was the first large public statue in Aberdeen and the first statue in Britain to be carved in granite. Monumental sculptors Macdonald and Leslie used their specialised tools and expertise to copy Campbell‚Äôs model and skilfully make the statue from one block. 

George was born in Edinburgh on 2 February 1770. He was educated at Eton. He became a professional soldier and rose to the rank of general. As Marquess of Huntly, he served with the guards in Flanders from 1793 to 1794. He commanded the 92nd Highlanders, which was originally raised by his father the Alexander Gordon as the 100 Regiment of Foot 1794 and renumbered in 1798.

He was a freemason and was Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Scotland from 1792 to 1794. He was Member of Parliament for Eye from 1806 to 1807. On 11 April 1807, at the age of 37, he was summoned to the House of Lords in one of the minor peerages of his father (Baron Gordon of Huntley, co. Gloucester). He was appointed a Privy Counsellor in 1830, was Keeper of the Great Seal of Scotland from 1828 to 1830 (a post that his father had held until 1827), and from 1827 to 1836 was Governor of Edinburgh Castle.

George, Duke of Gordon Statue, Aberdeen, Scotland
George, Duke of Gordon Statue, Aberdeen, Scotland
Views of Aberdeen, Scotland
Castle Street, Aberdeen, Scotland
Castle Street, Aberdeen, Scotland

In 2011 Trinity Church broke away from the Church of Scotland to join the International Presbyterian Church. But in the process it lost its meeting place of High Church Hilton, which is owned by its former denomination. It has been holding gatherings in hotel ballrooms, community centers and members’ front rooms ever since.

The congregation has been handed the keys to Queen Street Church, Aberdeen.

“We are a church family made up of people from different parts of the city and from all over the world. We are part of the International Presbyterian Church, which means we are led by elders and we work closely with other gospel-centred congregations. Folks in our fellowship come from a variety of church backgrounds, or none, and we do our best to welcome newcomers of all ages and stages of life.”

Trinity Church Aberdeen

For more information on the Trinity Church please visit their Website.

Trinity Church, Aberdeen, Scotland
Trinity Church, Aberdeen, Scotland
Oor Wullies, Big Bucket Trail, Aberdeen, Scotland
Arts Centre & Theatre, Aberdeen, Scotland

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Aberdeen #3

Day 5: 15 August 2019 – Exploring Aberdeen

Sir William Wallace 1270- 1305

He was born in 1270, probably near Paisley, Renfrew, Scotland. He was a Scottish knight who became one of the main leaders during the First War of Scottish Independence.

Sir William Wallace is remembered for leading the Scottish resistance forces to free Scotland from English rule. Many of the stories about Wallace (which are not supported by documentary evidence) have been traced to a late 15th-century romance ascribed to Harry the Minstrel, or ‚ÄúBlind Harry.‚ÄĚ

After his betrayal and capture, Wallace was taken to London, where he was tried. He was found guilty, hanged, disemboweled, beheaded, and quartered on 23rd August 1305.

Wallace’s death did not end Scotland’s Wars of Independence. Robert the Bruce continued the fight and achieved victory at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314.

The¬†William Wallace Statue¬†was erected 1888 in¬†Aberdeen,¬†Scotland, and depicts¬†Sir¬†William Wallace. Sculpted by¬†William Grant Stevenson, the statue is positioned opposite¬†His Majesty’s Theatre¬†and across from¬†Union Terrace Gardens.

William Wallace Statue, Aberdeen

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

14 August 2019: Day 4 of our Grand Tour of Scotland: Part 10 – Dundee

Good day everyone,

Hope you are all having a great day so far. I decided to share the last part of our visit to Dundee with you today. I know 2 days in a row…. We drove around Dundee trying to check off the different places of interest on our list.

Dudhope Castle

Dudhope Castle is an extended late medieval tower house located on the southern face of Dundee Law in Dundee.
It was built in the late 13th century by the Scrymgeour family, with the original castle being a smaller tower house.
In 1792 the castle was rented in an attempt to use it as a woolen factory, although the plan never came to fruition. In 1795 the park and the grounds were leased to the Board of Ordnance. They used Dudhope as a barracks for 95 years, from 1796 to 1879. Additional buildings were constructed, including a hospital, officer’s quarters, stables, and guard-rooms. The castle itself was used to accommodate 400 soldiers. The Board of Ordnance finally abandoned it in 1881.

Dudhope Castle
Dudhope Castle
Dudhope Castle

Steeple Church

The Tower is the oldest part of the structure, dating from the 15th century. Over centuries several church buildings have been erected and have fallen on the site. The present Steeple Church dates from 1789. The other parts of the building on the east side, the Mary Slessor Centre and Dundee Parish Church (St. Mary’s ), were built in 1840 after a fire.

Steeple Church
St Mary’s Parish Church
St. Mary’s Parish Church
Dundee
Oor Wullie’s Big Bucket Trail

Adam Duncan Statue

Admiral Adam Duncan, 1st Viscount Duncan (1 July 1731 ‚Äď 4 August 1804) was a British admiral who defeated the Dutch fleet off Camperdown on 11 October 1797. This victory is considered one of the most significant actions in naval history.

Adam Duncan was born and schooled in Dundee. He joined the Royal Navy, following in the footsteps of his uncle, Captain Robert Haldane. He went on to serve under him on HMS Trial and HMS Shoreham. In 1755 he was promoted to the rank of lieutenant, then in 1759 to a commander.

In 1763 Duncan returned home on half-pay. Despite his repeated efforts to gain another naval command, he spent much of the next fifteen years on the family estate at Lundie or in Dundee. On 6 June 1777, he married Henrietta. His father-in-law pulled some strings and, in late 1778, he was given command of HMS Suffolk and then of HMS Monarch.

Duncan remained in command of the North Sea fleet until he retired in 1801. He died three years later at the age of 73 and was buried in Lundie.

Adam Duncan Statue
Adam Duncan Statue
Adam Duncan Statue
Oor Wullie’s Big Bucket Trail

St. Paul’s Cathedral

St. Paul’s Cathedral is an Anglican cathedral in the city of Dundee, Scotland. It is the cathedral and administrative center of the Diocese of Brechin in the Scottish Episcopal Church.

In 1847, Alexander Penrose Forbes was elected new Bishop of Brechin and chose to make Dundee his permanent residence.

The foundation stone of the cathedral was laid on 21 July 1853 and, it was completed in 1855. It was designed by George Gilbert Scott and is in the style of the Middle or Decorated period of Gothic architecture. There is a peal of 8 bells; the tenor bell weighs 23 cwt.

The total cost of the building exceeded ¬£14,000, and ten years passed before the congregation could pay off all the debts incurred. The church was dedicated on All Saints Day, 1 November 1865. In 1905 St.Paul’s status was raised to cathedral.

St Paul’s Cathedral
St Paul’s Cathedral
St Paul’s Cathedral
Dundee

Mains Castle

Mains Castle (also known as Claverhouse Castle or Fintry Castle) is a 16th-century castle in Dundee, Scotland. It consists of several buildings surrounding a courtyard, although several of the original western buildings no longer exist. The family lived in the northern and eastern buildings, with the servants occupying the southern quarters. The castle also has a large, six-floor, square tower house with dressed cornerstones, which is typical of 16th-century construction.

Mains Castle
Mains Castle
Mains Castle
Mains Castle
Mains Castle

Claypotts Castle

Claypotts Castle is a late medieval castle in the suburban West Ferry area of Dundee, Scotland. It is one of the best-preserved examples of a 16th-century Z-plan tower house in Scotland. Now surrounded by modern housing, the castle is maintained as an Ancient Monument by Historic Environment Scotland.

It was built by John Strachan around 1569‚Äď1588 according to dates inscribed on stones that make up parts of the castle, which make its construction longer than usual for such a small building. The Strachan family leased the land from the Tironensian Abbey of Lindores starting in the early 16th century.

The legend has it that the castle was once home to an industrious brownie who helped the servants with their work, but that he left in disgust because of a lazy kitchen maid.

Claypotts Castle
Claypotts Castle
Claypotts Castle
Claypotts Castle
Claypotts Castle

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

“The world is a book, and those who do not travel read only one page.” ~Saint Augustine

Fighting a losing battle…

Hi there,

I am having trouble studying today.

First I tried studying using my computer monitor, but keep losing my place or just losing interest. I realy tried going paperless with my studies but I am not coping at all. I need to make notes, underline important facts so that I can remember them.

I ended up printing my module. It went okay for a while till all the formulas and number talks and there they lost me again.

Normally I start early in the morning around 7:00am, but today I only started around 11:30am maybe this is why I can’t concentrate.

Now I am writing a blog so that I don’t have to read about pixels per inch and, screen resolution and how to calculate it.

Okay I have waisted enough time. Going to meditate for 7 minutes just to recharge and then start from scratch again….

My way of studying. Printed module and electronic version.

Photos taken with my Huawei P30 lite.

Thank you for stopping by. Please feel free to leave some advise on studying…

Coreen