Just a Random Photo: 9 May 2021

Sonstraaldam, Durbanville

Thank you for your continued support and taking the time to look at my post.

 Have a fantastic day. Stay safe. Till next time

Coreen

Saturday Landscapes: 8 May 2021

Ceannabeinne Beach,Scotland

Thank you for taking the time to have a look at my post.

Have a amazing Saturday.

Coreen

Throwback Thursday: 6 May 2021

Today we continue our visit to the Augrabies Falls National Park. It is such a beautiful park and the different colors of the rock formations are just spectacular.

The best part of this visit and Sanparks Tour was the company. I loved traveling with my parents. I miss it a lot.

My parents
Rock Hyrax, Augrabies Falls National Park
Rock Hyrax, Augrabies Falls National Park
Rock Hyrax, Augrabies Falls National Park
Rock Hyrax, Augrabies Falls National Park
Mom and baby Rock Hyrax, Augrabies Falls National Park
Baby Rock Hyrax, Augrabies Falls National Park

That’s it for now, friends. Thank you very much for traveling back in time with me.

Have a fabulous day. 

Keep safe and healthy.

Coreen

Just a Random Photo: 6 May 2021

Thank you for your continued support and taking the time to look at my post.

 Have a fantastic day. Stay safe. Till next time

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Tarland

Day 5: 15 August 2019 – Tarland

Our next stop was not a planned one. Somewhere along the road I missed a turnoff or took the wrong turnoff. I am not complaining it was a beautiful road and the scenery was also breathtaking. Google maps also could not tell us where we are. We were on a unknown road. The first village we came across was Tarland.

For two days now I have been looking for information on Tarland and even the website don’t really give you any information on the history of the village.

Tarland (Gaelic: Turlann) is a village in Aberdeenshire, Scotland and is located 5 miles (8 km) northwest of Aboyne, and 30 miles (50 km) west of Aberdeen.

Views on Route to Tarland
Views on Route to Tarland
Views on Route to Tarland
Views on Route to Tarland
Views on Route to Tarland
Views on Route to Tarland

Tarland War Memorial

The Tarland war memorial stands in the village square looking east. It commemorates the dead from both World War I and II. It is a solid rectangular rough hewn block of granite sitting upright with names for World War II on a smooth face on the front. Below that is a later small angled plaque with the names for World War II. It sits on a two-step base. The monument is surmounted by the figure of a kilted soldier in battle dress, head bent holding an inverted rifle. It is surrounded by a low iron railing. It was sculpted in 1920 by Robert Morrison of E Morren, Aberdeen. The column is inscribed at the top, ‘WE GRATEFULLY REMEMBER ALL THE MEN OF THIS PARISH WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES FOR KING AND COUNTRY IN THE GREAT WAR’.

Tarland War Memorial
Tarland War Memorial

MacRobert Memorial Hall

The Tarland Welfare Trust was formed in 1951 for the purpose of building, equipping and maintaining a new village hall in Tarland. The land and money to build the Hall were gifted to the community by Lady MacRobert and hence its name. The Trustees of the Tarland Welfare Trust own and manage the Hall on behalf of the community under a ‘Declaration of Trust’. This states that the Memorial Hall be built ‘with a view to providing improved amenities and facilities for the public, so that the Hall may be run in the manner most beneficial to the Community’.

MacRobert Memorial Hall
MacRobert Memorial Hall
Tarland Main Road
The Commercial Hotel, Tarland, Scotland
Décor in The Commercial Hotel, Tarland, Scotland
Décor in The Commercial Hotel, Tarland, Scotland
Décor in The Commercial Hotel, Tarland, Scotland
Décor in The Commercial Hotel, Tarland, Scotland
Décor in The Commercial Hotel, Tarland, Scotland
Décor in The Commercial Hotel, Tarland, Scotland
Décor in The Commercial Hotel, Tarland, Scotland
Décor in The Commercial Hotel, Tarland, Scotland
Décor in The Commercial Hotel Ladies Bathroom, Tarland, Scotland
Delicious Tea
Pull Pork Burger, onion rings and chips
Beef Lasagne, House Salad and Garlic Bread
Aberdeen Arms Hotel
Tarland Toy Shop and Post Office
Tarland Parish Churchyard, Tarland
Boyne House, Tarland, Scotland

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Just a Random Photo: 3 May 2021

Hartlaub’s Gull at Plankiesbaai, Postberg Private Nature Reserve, West Coast National Park

Thank you for your continued support and taking the time to look at my post.

 Have a fantastic day. Stay safe. Till next time

Coreen

What’s In My Garden? #236

Greetings from my garden….

Our Garden (2020/11/06)

“We may think we are nurturing our garden, but of course it’s our garden that is really nurturing us.” ~Jenny Uglow

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me in exploring our garden.

Till next time, please stay safe and healthy. Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Just a Random Photo: 1 May 2021

Field of spring flowers, Postberg Private Nature Reserve, West Coast National Park

Thank you for your continued support and taking the time to look at my post.

 Have a fantastic day. Stay safe. Till next time

Coreen

Saturday Landscapes: 1 May 2021

Signal Hill, Cape Town

Thank you for taking the time to have a look at my post.

Have a amazing Saturday.

Coreen

Fauna and Flora Friday: 30 April 2021 -Black-headed Heron

Black-headed Heron, Ardea melanocephala

A large, grayish heron of drier habitats; note distinctly dark cap and nape contrasting with white throat. In-flight, the underwing is strongly contrasting black-and-white. The juvenile is duskier and duller. Juveniles resemble juvenile Gray Herons, juvenile Black-headed Herons have slate-gray rather than yellow legs. Gray Heron also has uniformly gray (not black-and-white) underwings.

It often feeds in shallow water, spearing fish or frogs with its long, sharp bill. It will also hunt well away from water, taking large insects, small mammals, and birds. It will wait motionless for its prey, or slowly stalk its victim.

The black-headed heron is largely sedentary, meaning that they will only migrate in response to a depletion of food. They are happy to nest in colonies of mixed bird species, often consisting of as many as 200 other birds. Generally, they hunt alone, but are not opposed to the idea of hunting while in a loosely-congregated feeding flock. A heron may travel up to 30 kilometers a day between its preferred feeding ground and its roost. This is a monogamous bird, sticking to one partner for life.

Herons usually breed in the wet season in colonies in trees, reedbeds, or cliffs using sticks, leaves and straw .

The male will use a loud yelp to attract a mate. Once the breeding pair has mated, she will build the nest from the materials that he gathers and then she will lay between 2 and 4 eggs in it. Both the male and the female are responsible for incubating the eggs until they hatch. Little is known about these chicks until they fledge, which happens at around 52 days of age, a week after which they become completely independent of the care of their parents.

Up to 35 breeding pairs can be found in one large tree, making this a very social, gregarious time for the adult birds.

Black-headed HeronArdea melanocephala, Tsaarbank, West Coast National Park
Black-headed HeronArdea melanocephala, Tsaarbank, West Coast National Park
Black-headed HeronArdea melanocephala, Tsaarbank, West Coast National Park

“Study nature, love nature, stay close to nature. It will never fail you.” ~Frank Lloyd Write

Thank you very much for taking the time to read my post. I hope you also learned something new today.

Have a fabulous day. Till next time, please stay safe and healthy.

Coreen