Saturday Landscapes: 8 May 2021

Ceannabeinne Beach,Scotland

Thank you for taking the time to have a look at my post.

Have a amazing Saturday.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Tarland

Day 5: 15 August 2019 – Tarland

Our next stop was not a planned one. Somewhere along the road I missed a turnoff or took the wrong turnoff. I am not complaining it was a beautiful road and the scenery was also breathtaking. Google maps also could not tell us where we are. We were on a unknown road. The first village we came across was Tarland.

For two days now I have been looking for information on Tarland and even the website don’t really give you any information on the history of the village.

Tarland (Gaelic: Turlann) is a village in Aberdeenshire, Scotland and is located 5 miles (8 km) northwest of Aboyne, and 30 miles (50 km) west of Aberdeen.

Views on Route to Tarland
Views on Route to Tarland
Views on Route to Tarland
Views on Route to Tarland
Views on Route to Tarland
Views on Route to Tarland

Tarland War Memorial

The Tarland war memorial stands in the village square looking east. It commemorates the dead from both World War I and II. It is a solid rectangular rough hewn block of granite sitting upright with names for World War II on a smooth face on the front. Below that is a later small angled plaque with the names for World War II. It sits on a two-step base. The monument is surmounted by the figure of a kilted soldier in battle dress, head bent holding an inverted rifle. It is surrounded by a low iron railing. It was sculpted in 1920 by Robert Morrison of E Morren, Aberdeen. The column is inscribed at the top, ‘WE GRATEFULLY REMEMBER ALL THE MEN OF THIS PARISH WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES FOR KING AND COUNTRY IN THE GREAT WAR’.

Tarland War Memorial
Tarland War Memorial

MacRobert Memorial Hall

The Tarland Welfare Trust was formed in 1951 for the purpose of building, equipping and maintaining a new village hall in Tarland. The land and money to build the Hall were gifted to the community by Lady MacRobert and hence its name. The Trustees of the Tarland Welfare Trust own and manage the Hall on behalf of the community under a ‘Declaration of Trust’. This states that the Memorial Hall be built ‘with a view to providing improved amenities and facilities for the public, so that the Hall may be run in the manner most beneficial to the Community’.

MacRobert Memorial Hall
MacRobert Memorial Hall
Tarland Main Road
The Commercial Hotel, Tarland, Scotland
Décor in The Commercial Hotel, Tarland, Scotland
Décor in The Commercial Hotel, Tarland, Scotland
Décor in The Commercial Hotel, Tarland, Scotland
Décor in The Commercial Hotel, Tarland, Scotland
Décor in The Commercial Hotel, Tarland, Scotland
Décor in The Commercial Hotel, Tarland, Scotland
Décor in The Commercial Hotel, Tarland, Scotland
Décor in The Commercial Hotel, Tarland, Scotland
Décor in The Commercial Hotel Ladies Bathroom, Tarland, Scotland
Delicious Tea
Pull Pork Burger, onion rings and chips
Beef Lasagne, House Salad and Garlic Bread
Aberdeen Arms Hotel
Tarland Toy Shop and Post Office
Tarland Parish Churchyard, Tarland
Boyne House, Tarland, Scotland

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Wordless Wednesday: 28 April 2021

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Craigievar Castle

Day 5: 15 August 2019 Craigievar Castle

We left Alford to the next place of interest on our list. Craigievar Castle. The views along the road was stunning and I tried to stop as often as I could.

On Route to Craigievar Castle
Beautiful landscapes on route to Craigievar Castle
Beautiful landscapes on route to Craigievar Castle
Beautiful landscapes on route to Craigievar Castle
Beautiful landscapes on route to Craigievar Castle
Beautiful landscapes on route to Craigievar Castle

Craigievar Castle

Craigievar Castle, Alford, Scotland

Craigievar Castle is a pinkish harled castle or fortified country house 6 miles (9.7 km) south of Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. It was the seat of Clan Sempill, and the Forbes family resided here for 350 years until 1963 when the property was given to the National Trust for Scotland by William Forbes-Sempill, 19th Lord Sempill in the 1960s.
The setting is among scenic rolling foothills of the Grampian Mountains, the contrast of its massive lower story structure to the finely sculpted multiple turrets, gargoyles, and high corbelling work to create a classic fairytale appearance.

An excellent example of the original Scottish Baronial architecture, the seven-story castle was completed in 1626 by the Aberdonian merchant William Forbes, ancestor of the Forbes baronets of Craigievar and brother of the Bishop of Aberdeen, Patrick Forbes of Corse Castle. Forbes purchased the partially completed structure from the impoverished Mortimer family in the year 1610. He arranged for the continued construction, completing it in 1625 or 1626.
Forbes was nicknamed Danzig Willy and Willy the Merchant due to his international trading success with the Baltic states.

Craigievar Castle, Alford, Scotland


By the early 1800s, the tower had fallen into decay. Sir John Forbes had considered demolishing it. He consulted the Aberdeen city architect John Smith who advised against that course of action, stating the tower was: one of the finest specimens in the Country of the age and style in which it was built. He decided to restore the building. Roof repairs were undertaken circa 1826; a timber base covered with slates was used. At about the same time, the towers were altered and raised, and a new entrance door was put in subsequently restoring it to the original entrance.


Re-construction of almost the entire top floor was also completed. The windows, external harling, and pointing were replaced. It is likely Smith also designed the Gardeners cottage.

Gardeners Cottage, Craigievar Castle, Alford, Scotland
Gardeners Cottage, Craigievar Castle, Alford, Scotland
Gardeners Cottage, Craigievar Castle, Alford, Scotland


The castle originally had more defensive elements, including a walled courtyard with four round towers; only one of the round towers remains today. The arched door to the round tower is preserved the carved initials of Sir Thomas Forbes, William Forbes’ son. There is also a massive iron portcullis or gate covering the entrance door named a yett.
According to the folklore of the area, the castle is haunted by one or more ghosts.

Craigievar Castle, Alford, Scotland
Craigievar Castle, Alford, Scotland
Craigievar Castle, Alford, Scotland
Craigievar Castle, Alford, Scotland


Following the former owner’s wishes, artificial light has not been installed on the upper floors. This means that the extensive collection of historic artifacts and art is seen by only the shifting light from the sun, as it would have been when they were made.


The grounds are equally bewitching with an unusual Scottish glen garden, two waymarked woodland trails, and Victorian kitchen garden. In early summer, the woodland floor glows with bluebells. Keep an eye out for red squirrels or even pine martens scurrying through the undergrowth.

Field surrounding Craigievar Castle, Alford, Scotland
Craigievar Castle, Alford, Scotland
Flag, Craigievar Castle, Alford, Scotland
Flag, Craigievar Castle, Alford, Scotland
Water well, Craigievar Castle, Alford, Scotland
Craigievar Castle, Alford, Scotland

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Alford #3

Day 5: 15 August 2019 Exploring Alford

Dad and I both needed a bathroom quite urgently, but when we got to Grampian Transport Museum they were still closed. Luckily for us there was public bathrooms a few steps from the museum.

We could not wait for the museum to open so we just took a few photos on the grounds. Will visit them when I move to Scotland someday.

Grampian Transport Museum

It is a transport museum and charitable-based trust located in Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. Its exhibits chart the history of transport in the north east of Scotland through dramatic displays, working and climb-aboard vehicle exhibits and video presentations.

The museum was formed after a group of local transport enthusiasts and collectors in the early 1970s sought to develop a local transport museum. In 1978, the group held a public meeting at which, after an offer was made to lease the former goods yard to the north of the former Alford railway station, the Grampian Transport Museum Association was formed. A pilot museum was established in a local factory in 1981, and after the first annual Alford Cavalcade vintage vehicle rally held during July, a combination of local councils offered grants and subsidies to establish a permanent exhibition base. Construction work on the current building was completed in September 1982, and the museum opened in April 1983. An extension was completed in 1998, landscaping and a track added in the early 2000s, and a second building, the Collections Centre, to house larger exhibits in the 2010s. In 2016, the museum completed a new reception extension to improve the frontage of the museum and provide a warm welcome to its visitors.

Drinking Fountain and Cattle Trough
The Birkhall portable steam engine was built in 1942 by Marshall of Gainsborough to an order from the wartime Ministry of Supply.
Police Call Box
Police Call Box

After our visit to Grampian we did some more exploring of Alford on our way to our next stop.

Fountain, 1891. A ponderous pink and grey granite erection in memory of Robert Farquharson of Haughton whose family arms are on the wall of the adjacent (once Station) hotel.
Houghton Arms Hotel, Alford, Scotland
W&R Murray, Alford, Scotland

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Squared: 20 April 2021

Ceannabeinne

Thank you very much for taking the time to have a look at my work.

Stay safe and healthy. Till next time.

Have a Fabulous day.

Coreen

Monochrome Monday: 19 April 2021

Armadale Litter Tree and Cattle Grid, Scotland

“Color is descriptive. Black and White is interpretive.” ~Eliot Erwitt

Thank you for taking the time to have a look at my work.

Till next time, stay safe and healthy.

Coreen

Squared: 14 April 2021

Ceannabeinne, Scotland

Thank you very much for taking the time to have a look at my work.

Stay safe and healthy. Till next time.

Have a Fabulous day.

Coreen

Grand Tour Of Scotland: Alford #2

Day 5: 15 August 2019 – Exploring Alford

While exploring Alford one of the places on my list was the Alford Valley Railway Museum. When we got there it was closed for business. I must say I was very disappointed. I was looking forward to visit and ride on the train. I took some photos of the grounds although there was not much to see.

Alford Valley Railway Museum

The construction of the Alford Valley Railway began in 1856 and the line opened in 1859. It ran in a westerly direction from Kintore, a station on the line from Aberdeen to Inverness. The line served Kemnay Quarry and three other granite quarries in the area.

The current station building is on the site of the original granite structure which was demolished after British Rail closed the line. The passenger platform is the original. A small railway museum is housed in the railway station building. The original locomotive shed was situated to the east of the station but this has also now been demolished. To the west of the station the granite carriage shed of the previous railway is now used by the Alford Valley Railway.

Alford Valley Railway, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Valley Railway, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Valley Railway, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Valley Railway Museum in background. Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden

Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden

In 1998 at the instigation of Alford and District Rotary Club an adhoc committee consisting of representatives from all the local voluntary organizations was established. Their purpose was to create a lasting memorial to the start of the new millennium. Suggestions was made and they decided on a sculpture garden.

The land was provided by Aberdeenshire Council and the artist Louise Gardner did the layout of the garden and also created the sculptures. A local quarrying company was asked to provide pieces of Corrennie Granite which they kindly donated and conveyed to the Scottish Sculpture Workshop at Lumsden.

The garden was officially opened on 25 October 2003.

The largest stone shows a family group whit the man leading his wife and child into the new millennium. The man looking back to the second stone where domestic animals represent agriculture on which Alford was founded. When the railway reached the Village it became the natural gathering point for livestock and produce from surrounding farms destined for markets in the south.

Stone 1: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 1: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 1: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 2: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 2: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

The various animals and birds on the third Stone represent nature on which all of life depends.

Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Stone 3: Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

Children at Alford Academy were asked to create clay shields displaying some aspect of Alford or its surroundings that appealed to them. The shields, also, were taken to Lumsden where the Workshop used them to form molds for the castings of the bronzes which can be seen set into the pavement.

Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Alford Millennium Sculpture Garden, Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

Thank you very much for taking the time to join me on my travels through Scotland. I hope you enjoyed it just as much as I did.

Till next time, safe travels and keep dreaming.

Have a fabulous day.

Coreen

Just a Random Photo: 12 April 2021

Ocean from Ferry

Thank you for your continued support and taking the time to look at my post.

 Have a fantastic day. Stay safe. Till next time

Coreen